Author Topic: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides  (Read 5946 times)

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Offline Mike Steele

  • Posts: 6
Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« on: September 23, 2011, 03:51 PM »
Hello Everyone,

My wife and I are in the process of buying a new home.  This home has several cabinets with exposed sides to which I want to add picture frame moulding to give the sides a frame and panel look.  However, I have a few questions.

What is the best method to attach these frames?  Glue (any particular type?), headless pins or both?

Will I see problems if I attach wood frames to the plywood cabinet sides in regards to wood movement?  Will mdf be better?  The cabinets will be painted, but I prefer working with wood.

Are there any tried and true methods to determine width for the stiles/rails relative to the size of the cabinet sides?

I plan on using Benjamin Moore Aura paint.  Anyone use this?  Any tips on application?

Any advice/wisdom you can impart is appreciated.

Regards to All,
Mike


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Offline fidelfs

  • Posts: 527
  • Houston, TX
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2011, 03:53 PM »
I am building my kitchen cabinets and I am planning to use Benjamin Moore Advance.  It has the properties of Oil base paint but it is water based.

It looks great and durable.

There is never a situation where it can't be done with the right hand tool - even though it may be a lot more work.

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6112
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2011, 04:33 PM »
I have yet to find a glue that will stick well to the finish on cabinets. Pins are your best bet here.

I have used Aura paint, I'll leave it at that...................

How are you applying the finish?

Tom

Offline Mike Steele

  • Posts: 6
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2011, 03:28 PM »
Thank you both for the quick replies.

fidelfs - I will look into Advance.  I do want to use water-based, if possible, so it sounds encouraging.

Tom - I planned on applying the Aura using brushes and rollers.  Sounds like you didn't have a great experience with Aura.  I have read conflicting reports on the difficulty of applying it.  Most common issues are the quick setting time and paint thickness.

Regards,
Mike

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3560
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2011, 03:55 PM »
Hello Everyone,

My wife and I are in the process of buying a new home.

Congratulations!

What is the best method to attach these frames?  Glue (any particular type?), headless pins or both?

I have used Titebond melamine glue with some success. It's ok along with a mechanical (pin, nail or tenon etc.) but weak on it's own. You need to make sure one side of the glued joint is porous. If both sides are painted or sealed the glue will not dry properly or very slowly as there isn't anything to dissipate the moisture. I am assuming you will be sanding the cabinets before you paint. Festool sanders and DC make this (PIA) job so much more pleasant.
[/quote]

Will I see problems if I attach wood frames to the plywood cabinet sides in regards to wood movement?  
Not unless you are subjecting it to extreme heat or moisture or both in the case of a boiling kettle etc.


Will mdf be better?  
No, but compared to what?

The cabinets will be painted, but I prefer working with wood.
I am assuming that you are going to repaint all the cabinets.

Are there any tried and true methods to determine width for the stiles/rails relative to the size of the cabinet sides?
Not that I know of. If you are going to be looking at the sides, from say the dinning room etc. then the proportions of stile and rail to panel should be pleasing. I like to compare what I think looks good to a golden rectangle and work from there but that's not always possible given all of the things that have to fit into a kitchen.

I plan on using Benjamin Moore Aura paint.  Anyone use this?  Any tips on application?

Never used it. I like BM paint and have used it extensively (gallons of oil based decorators white), but I wouldn't personally paint a kitchen cabinet with it.
I would recommend Farrow and Ball paints which are water based Alkyd paints. While I have not used them, there are some here who have and find they hold up well. I would look into coating the cabinets with a good polyurethane for extra protection.
Good luck and take some pictures so we can see how it turns out.
Tim



« Last Edit: September 24, 2011, 05:13 PM by Tim Raleigh »

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6112
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2011, 04:03 PM »
Mike,

I was going to recommend Kem-Aqua, bit it needs to be sprayed for the best results.

As Tim pointed out, if you are going to paint them a few clear coats will help protect the finish.

Tom

Offline mishle

  • Posts: 122
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2011, 11:37 AM »
I would pin it then and if possible screw it from the inside of the cabinet.

It would only take a couple of screws if the frame is all one piece.

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4617
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2011, 12:39 PM »
I have always glued and pinned. Titebond III , if that does not work West Epoxy certainly will, even on shiny kitchen cabinets. Or sand the finish off the sides and for sure Titebond II or III will work. III is always better in a kitchen though. A picture would be best, I need to see these exposed sides. Are they a high gloss paint? Or like my  Oak cabinets did they pull a shot and the sides are nothing more than contact paper type material over the ply or MDF in the same color as the cabinets?

A lot of times I have pre made a panel and then just attached the entire panel to the ugly sides with a few screws or nails depending on what the side material and thickness is of the current sides are.

I would match the current material, you can use mdf, but Extira, Miratec or something of that nature is probably better than MDF for the side panels in a kitchen.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2011, 12:45 PM by Dovetail65 »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Mike Steele

  • Posts: 6
Re: Picture Frame Moulding For Exposed Cabinet Sides
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2011, 08:14 PM »
Thanks, Everyone.  I appreciate you sharing your experiences and wisdom.

Although it was poorly worded, my primary concern was about adding the frame to the exposed cabinet sides and the potential for wood movement.  It appears from the responses that I don't need to worry about wood movement under these circumstances.  Since the frames will be one piece, the idea of using screws on the inside is an interesting one to consider.  And I agree that matching the current material is the best approach.

To answer some of the questions posed, the oak plywood cabinets are currently stained a dark brown and finished with poly.  I will be cleaning with TSP and sanding to 150 grit before attaching the framing to the cabinet sides.  Once attached, I will be priming and painting the cabinets to lighten the room.  I was on the fence regarding a topcoat of water-based poly.  However, I'm one to err on the side of caution, so a topcoat is most likely going to be applied.

I'm not 100% sold on a brand of paint, but I do want to keep it water-based, if possible.  I also forewarned my wife that a hvlp sprayer is in my future, so I am not discounting the possibility of spraying.  The only reason I mentioned brush/roller was because the paint I was originally considering (BM Aura) cannot be sprayed due to its viscosity and the recommendation not to dilute it in any way.  Looks like I have more research to do on the paint, which now includes Kem-Aqua. 

Thanks again for all the sage advice.

Mike