Author Topic: Natural Lighting  (Read 4047 times)

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Offline biomedfred

  • Posts: 15
Natural Lighting
« on: March 29, 2013, 05:02 PM »
So the wife has finally given me the permission to close in in our carport and turn it into a shop.  It isn't huge, the width is only for one car.  Two sides back up to our fence, and a third has a half height wall with openings up to the roof.  Would anyone recommended framing these openings as windows for natural light?  It seems like a good idea but I'm curious to hear some opinions of others on the use of natural light vs not.

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Offline builderbob

  • Posts: 1361
    • RJP Remodeling
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2013, 05:53 PM »
Keep as much wall space as you can!  Maybe a transom, skylight?  A second form of egress is definitely a good idea so a window that you can fit through is safe!
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Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2380
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2013, 06:13 PM »
Wall space is a premium in a small shop, if you want natural light consider a few skylights.  I just can't commit my small shop walls to windows so, I just had 12 overhead lights installed.

Jack

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3559
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2013, 06:21 PM »
If you like natural light I would recommend one or two skylights as well. I have occasionally worked in garages that had them and they were nice to have. 
While I like natural light, it can get create a lot of contrast (light/dark) areas and if you are working on projects that are large it can be a bit of problem when the light is stream in from the skylight and blasting out one side of your work while the rest sits in the shade.
Tim

Offline RL

  • Posts: 3040
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2013, 06:31 PM »
I can't stand being in a workshop without windows, after all it's a hobby not an office cubicle. I say go for as many windows as possible, and if you need shade, add some blinds.


Offline Frank Pellow

  • Posts: 2748
  • Toronto, Ontario and Lake Pivabiska, Ontario
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2013, 06:56 PM »
I have two woodworking sheds and they both have lots of natural light via the use of skylights and windows high up on the wall.  They both also have lots of wall space down lower for hanging tools, storing wood, etc.

I would hate to work in a space without natural light.

Cheers,   
               Frank (Festool connoisseur)

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2380
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2013, 07:44 PM »
I should add that while my shop doesn't have windows, it is my garage and the door is always open when I'm working.

Offline Aaron Underdahl

  • Posts: 65
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2013, 07:57 PM »
I work in about 1500 sf shop without any natural light at all.   It gets very depressing the days I have to spend long hours in it.   I find myself coming up with a bunch of reasons to go outside for a while. 
 I really like the idea of sky lights.  I don't know why I never considered them before.

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3312
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2013, 07:59 PM »
my shop has no windows.
i would love some windows but dont want to loose the wall space
skylights arent an option with the storage are above

i was thinking about solartubes but went no farther

i would put in the windows and then make  some shutters that slide over the window to block them . that way you can store handtools and small items on them but open them to let the light in or closed to stop people looking in
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
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Offline biomedfred

  • Posts: 15
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2013, 02:13 AM »
Thanks guys. This is all great info. I'll be sure to keep everyone in the loop as my plans progress.

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5803
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2013, 11:51 AM »
I wouldnt entirely enclose the front/entry way. I would make the opening/ door as big as you can like a regular garage door. That way you can open it get the light in when you want to, close it and keep the heat in when you need to, and it makes it a heck of a lot easier to haul in sheet goods and take out large pieces you've made.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3808
Re: Natural Lighting
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2013, 07:16 PM »
You might want to evaluate the use of sun tubes.  SolaTube is one of many manufacturers.  The nice thing is that they have less negative effect on the insulation above as compared to skylights.  Installed correctly, they bring in a bunch of good light, regardless of weather.  They seem to be less noisy than skylights, too, especially in a heavy rain. 
- Willy -

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