Author Topic: Home Office Remodel  (Read 20299 times)

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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Home Office Remodel
« on: June 16, 2020, 12:01 PM »
I got into woodworking with the goal of being able to make stuff for the house. Last year I tackled Plantation Shutter Madness. This year's project is taking it up another notch with lots of remodel and cabinetry which are also firsts for me. We have a home office where I work full time. With the uncertainty of returning to the office for my wife in the foreseeable future I set out to convert it into a more usable space that we could both share.



I've spent the last few weeks taking out the closet and re-running electrical. Mistakes were made but I've been learning as I go. I ran a new outlet where I plan on having a corner computer cabinet and raised two existing outlets to above where the counter will sit when installed.



 Today I had to patch the floor where the closet used to be. .that was difficult. I ended up ripping the tongue off some of the pieces that I found in the basement when we bought the house 2 years ago. Then there was about a 5 degree taper along the width of the opening. I took light passes with the track saw until I could shove the patch flooring into place.





I have been up to the attic so much during all of the wiring that I feel like I could walk around up there blindfolded. The room is almost done being prepped so I can get started on building the cabinets this weekend.

Phase 1 is the base cabinets and countertop. I'll be doing frameless cabinets and using the LR32 system for line boring. I hope to update this post as I get going.



Stay tuned.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

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Offline mike_aa

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2020, 03:13 PM »
@DynaGlide  Nice job on the floor patch!  Good luck with the rest of the build!

Mike A.
 

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2020, 08:13 PM »
@DynaGlide - usual good planning job, Matt!
GReat way to recover poorly utilized closet space. Your right: that floor remodel will not be noticed on an the furnished space.

Here are some random order brainstorming topics:

How much detailed planning have you given to each workspace usage needs?
SKYPE Meetings vieod surrounding and video face llighting
Ergonomics - laptop? - keyboard tray? monitor viewing distance to seated position? monitor height adjustable desk atands or repositionable wall arms?
Rounded  bullnose edges on worksurfaces
Thougts given to sit-stand desk surfaces?
cable management access below
110 Volt outlet run on the walll 30 - 42 inches high all around?
Powered USB outlets
Cable trays accessible from above
easy access to the back of desktop PC's living on the floor
Printer location for easy access from each swivel chairs
Desk Space with task lighting for workpapers
Remember that 24" deskspace is greatly reduced by two monitors and a keyboard plus perhaps a Laptop arm (email)
Long days at the desk - where do the feet stretch
Speakers
SKYPE video camera/mic between monitors

the size of the room or door and window locations?
Have you considered other non-corner layouts before choosing the finalist?

Where are heating and airconditioning outlets relative to person's seating? - blowing air is not comfortable for extended periods

Finally: flexibility to reconfigure as your needs (will) change :)

We'll vicariously enjoy your progress here via the FOG!
Hans

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 329
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2020, 05:29 AM »
I don't know how many electrical appliances you plan on having in that office, but I highly recommend a power switch. Years ago I made a small 19 inch rack for my computers and added space for a network patch panel and a power switch. I still am glad I did that.

Something like this:

* power_switch.jpg (9.1 kB - downloaded 225 times.)

Of course, you might not have any 19 inch IT stuff, but a power switch still is ideal. And you can connect any powered device to it, not just IT stuff. Some even have USB outlets. I bought mine at a store for DJ's. Not sure where you could buy them in the States. To sum up some benefits: easy access to power buttons, a visible queue to whether something is powered on or not, saving energy (because you don't have the transformers on stand-by all the time), reduced risk of fire (for the same reason), (possibly) reduced clutter on or below your desk.

If you have low frequency units for a sound system and don't want to kick against them with your feet all the time, make sure you don't forget to create an "out of the way" place for them as well.

[Edit: sorry, that picture was meant to go inline...]

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2020, 09:02 AM »
Matt, another item to consider is Ethernet cabling and router placement.  Now is the time to consider cable routing.  If you plan on having your main router in the office, consider placing it high on a shelf so that little affects the Wi-Fi signal strength.  Consider also how you'll get the Ethernet or coax cabling from the ONT (assuming you're using FiOS) to your router.  Get those cable paths established before construction,  Also consider placing some cable grommets in the countertop to help rout cabling out of sight.  If you and SWMBO plan on sharing a printer, that will add cabling between the router and the printer, and to each computer (docking station).  We can chat some time about the setup. 
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2020, 09:06 AM »
@DynaGlide - usual good planning job, Matt!
GReat way to recover poorly utilized closet space. Your right: that floor remodel will not be noticed on an the furnished space.

Here are some random order brainstorming topics:

How much detailed planning have you given to each workspace usage needs?
SKYPE Meetings vieod surrounding and video face llighting
Ergonomics - laptop? - keyboard tray? monitor viewing distance to seated position? monitor height adjustable desk atands or repositionable wall arms?
Rounded  bullnose edges on worksurfaces
Thougts given to sit-stand desk surfaces?
cable management access below
110 Volt outlet run on the walll 30 - 42 inches high all around?
Powered USB outlets
Cable trays accessible from above
easy access to the back of desktop PC's living on the floor
Printer location for easy access from each swivel chairs
Desk Space with task lighting for workpapers
Remember that 24" deskspace is greatly reduced by two monitors and a keyboard plus perhaps a Laptop arm (email)
Long days at the desk - where do the feet stretch
Speakers
SKYPE video camera/mic between monitors

the size of the room or door and window locations?
Have you considered other non-corner layouts before choosing the finalist?

Where are heating and airconditioning outlets relative to person's seating? - blowing air is not comfortable for extended periods

Finally: flexibility to reconfigure as your needs (will) change :)

We'll vicariously enjoy your progress here via the FOG!
Hans

Hans - There sure is a lot to digest with your post. Luckily I don't do video conferences with my work on a regular basis. I will be in the corner to allow placement of up to 3 monitors. My wife does a fair share of video calls but her computer camera will not include me. These are valid considerations that I didn't even take into account.

The desk is more or less standardized using guidance from the Blum Process32 manual for an office desk. That is - 30.5" final height and 24" deep base cabinets. Luckily I have an IKEA desk currently with similar height dimensions that I've used for several years so I have a good feeling of what is "right" for me.

For wiring I will have cable trays underneath each work area and cutouts in the cabinets where required. The outlets have all been relocated to above desk height an appropriate distance save for the one outlet I added which will be brought into the corner computer cabinet. No door will go on that cabinet as I plan on building a PC and locating it inside along with some minor network equipment.

The printer will be up on top of the desk and under a bookshelf (later stage of the project) above where the corner computer cabinet will sit.

We went through several iterations to get to the final design working within the constraints of the doors for the room and the available space. Initially we planned a sort of double L extending into the middle of the room but abandoned the idea when we realized the room wasn't wide enough. The corner desk isn't ideal however the double wide cabinets to the left and right of the corner were necessary for storage of larger items that wouldn't do well in a single width cabinet.

I hope to have some sort of rounded profile for the counter. I'm still researching the laminate. It's tough with COVID-19. I am unable to see any product in person because of restrictions in place.

@hdv Interesting I've never come across that before. For my needs that would be overkill. At most there will be a handful of items in the PC cabinet. I'm not a networking engineer and will have any patch panels or switches located in the basement.

I setup my cutting station yesterday prior to delivery of the sheet goods. It's the Veritas Panel Platform Kit https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/tools/workshop/workbenches/work-surfaces/76830-veritas-panel-platform-kit

clamped to a pair of Tracktubes on DeWALT lightweight horses. What I love about this setup is it's so easy to break down into a small storage space and setup a rock solid sacrificial and comfortable cutting surface. Oh and the sacrificial boards are ripped down cedar from a shelf I had at the time so I get to smell that every time I use it.  ;D







Stay tuned.

Matt
« Last Edit: June 17, 2020, 09:18 AM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2020, 10:07 AM »
FWIW...Doug Mockett sells tons of architectural hardware for the office.

Cable grommets   https://www.mockett.com/grommets-wire-management#page=1&top=295&

Power grommets and recessed receptacles   https://www.mockett.com/power-communication-systems/#page=5&top=468&

Desk accessories   https://www.mockett.com/ergonomics-table-work-surface-accessories/

Besides, Doug is another motor-head. He runs, as in drives, a 1954 Oldsmobile Super 88 in the Carrera Panamericana and the Pikes Peak hill climb every year. I know he's won both of the races at least once.




Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1010
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2020, 02:41 PM »
Matt,

I have some brown grommets leftover from long ago.  You can have them if you want them. The brown color might not work for your design, however.

Cheese,

I recall that my Grandfather had a mid-50's ( I think it was a '55) Olds 88.  I'm pretty sure he didn't have flames on the front end.  [big grin]

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2020, 12:04 PM »
It's been a busy few days. I broke down all of the sheets in the garage using TSO squares and parallel guides. It worked out pretty well. It would be best suited for someone with several longer rails to avoid swapping hardware back and forth and joining rails between rip and cross cuts. But I made do. I think the pictures explain everything but I'm happy to elaborate if needed:















Using that cutting table affirmed my decision to avoid the upcoming STM 1800. It's just too clunky trying to line panels up so they're properly supported when you're switching back and forth from rip and cross cuts and moving a guide rail around and trying not to walk into the support arms of the cutting table. Next time I'll likely do everything on the MFT tables.

I gave a new product (to me) a shot for edgebanding. The Fastedge white PVC edging. I was all prepared to use my MFK 700 to trim it but it's so easy to cut with quad trimmers that I didn't even get it out. I was pleasantly surprised by how nice this product applied and trimmed that for painted projects I don't think I'd use anything else.







And now onto something I cobbled together around February but haven't had the chance to put to use. I borrowed some ideas from way back on this forum to modify my LR-32 parallel guides. Longer hexagon rods with easier to read adhesive tape and different knobs (levers?) for attaching to the guide rail. On top of that I got to try out the vacuum guide rail clamps from @simonh . One of the benefits of the longer parallel guides is I can setup for the 261mm center row of holes without any goofy measuring and eyeballing. I've included a video of how the whole setup works. I apologize for the quality, it's from my security camera. I am extremely pleased with the setup.





















And finally, on Father's Day my brother helped me run Cat6 to my Office from the basement:

« Last Edit: June 22, 2020, 12:16 PM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 1329
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2020, 12:10 PM »
Love the vacuum rail clamp idea! Ill have to implement something like that myself!
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2020, 03:13 PM »
Nicely documented, Matt!  One suggestion, though - when you're joining two rails with the Betterley, I'd suggest that you use the
Guide Rail Index LA-LR 32 FS, Item number 496938 to space the holey rails properly to get a consistent 32mm pattern at the join point.  Feel free to ping me if this doesn't make sense.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 319
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2020, 05:42 PM »
And finally, on Father's Day my brother helped me run Cat6 to my Office from the basement:


Just a random question.  How did you cut the hole in the plywood floor/ceiling for the Cat6 blue cable?  It looks like you took a spade bit and drilled about 20 holes around the edge of the area you wanted cut out.  It does not look like any saw, that cuts a straight line,  was used to cut the hole.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2020, 07:17 PM »
@RussellS That is a fair question. .the answer is I didn't do it. The only way we could get the Cat6 to the attic was to use an existing Coax run that was installed after the house was built. Some other hack did that hole.

I started assembling some boxes and when I got to my second one I ran into an issue on one side of the bottom of the cabinet:



Some of the screws are bulging out the bottom. I know part of it was operator error (me) not drilling perfectly straight before driving them in. I marked 9mm from the bottom as a guide but I was working in a weird spot on this particular box. But I figured I'd stop and ask: Are #8 the standard for this application? If so I'll just be more careful moving forward. My first thought was that I was hitting the Dominos with the screws but I checked and that wasn't the case.

Thanks,
Matt
« Last Edit: June 22, 2020, 07:20 PM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1010
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2020, 07:23 PM »
Hey Matt

Looks like a good start to your project.  I don't think the use of a #8 screw is a problem in 3/4"/18 mm material.  That is what I used on all those bookcases I built recently. I did drill a pilot hole before driving each screw.   Did you size the pilot hole so it worked with the size of the shank of the screw?

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2020, 07:28 PM »
Matt, pre-drill the screw holes just slightly under the screw shank dimension.  On the hack job, you'll do well to cut some left-over 3/4" material to completely cover that area, but bore a hole just big enough to fit the cable bundle.  Split that cover piece right through the hole so that you can install the cover without having to re-run the cabling.  Once it's installed tightly around the cable bundle, use fire-stop caulk around the edges, the split, and around the cable bundle.  Also, caulk around the ductwork beside the cable hole.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2020, 07:29 PM »
Hey Matt

Looks like a good start to your project.  I don't think the use of a #8 screw is a problem in 3/4"/18 mm material.  That is what I used on all those bookcases I built recently. I did drill a pilot hole before driving each screw.   Did you size the pilot hole so it worked with the size of the shank of the screw?

Very timely response. .I am using a #8 snappy countersink bit. I re-did the bulged screws and had no issues when I focused more on going in straight. I guess I was just careless with my drilling.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2020, 10:03 PM »
Great project and progress Matt!  Cableorganizer.com has some pretty good materials for grommets, under mount cable management, cable ties from Velcro, etc.

Looking forward to the progress!

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2020, 10:05 PM »
@DynaGlide - your project pictures along with pointers from the likes of Sparktrician are a big helpo for many facing this kind of work.

Your LR-32 Hex bar extension pictures the same solution we developed last year when we ran into the same limitations with the short standard bars and the awkward tightening/releasing of the FESTOOL attachment. We hesitated to put it into production because we were not sure if the market is big enough to justify the effort.

Maybe some other LR-32 users, who would rather do woodworking than building shopmade fixtures, will speak up ? ?

Hans

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2020, 08:40 AM »
@DynaGlide - your project pictures along with pointers from the likes of Sparktrician are a big helpo for many facing this kind of work.

Your LR-32 Hex bar extension pictures the same solution we developed last year when we ran into the same limitations with the short standard bars and the awkward tightening/releasing of the FESTOOL attachment. We hesitated to put it into production because we were not sure if the market is big enough to justify the effort.

Maybe some other LR-32 users, who would rather do woodworking than building shopmade fixtures, will speak up ? ?

Hans

@neilc Hey Neil. Thanks for the link I think I'll check those out. I'm still dreading doing the countertop. But one thing at a time!

@TSO_Products Hans that's interesting to hear. I'd love to check out what you cooked up. My setup works but you know I have an affinity for the blue stuff. .which leads to:









The Big Foot has been invaluable here for vertical plunges with this winged contraption. The Domino is a bit unwieldy without it but I was able to do two cabinet sides and the bottom all on the tight setting and fit them together (bad idea, it was hard to assemble and have since switched to first tight for alignment, rest of the mortises on medium). You get such a good purchase with the Big Foot that you can hold the Domino firmly in place and plunge with your other hand. Very happy with this product. Thank you again Hans.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 2052
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2020, 11:33 AM »
@DynaGlide - your project pictures along with pointers from the likes of Sparktrician are a big helpo for many facing this kind of work.

Your LR-32 Hex bar extension pictures the same solution we developed last year when we ran into the same limitations with the short standard bars and the awkward tightening/releasing of the FESTOOL attachment. We hesitated to put it into production because we were not sure if the market is big enough to justify the effort.

Maybe some other LR-32 users, who would rather do woodworking than building shopmade fixtures, will speak up ? ?

Hans

@TSO_Products Hans I'm interested but primarily due to a pending project July-ish. If you had something available now I'd buy, absent that I will probably whomp up a DIY set.

@DynaGlide Matt - where did you obtain the hex bar stock, MMC?

Thanks,

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2020, 02:19 PM »
@DynaGlide - your project pictures along with pointers from the likes of Sparktrician are a big helpo for many facing this kind of work.

Your LR-32 Hex bar extension pictures the same solution we developed last year when we ran into the same limitations with the short standard bars and the awkward tightening/releasing of the FESTOOL attachment. We hesitated to put it into production because we were not sure if the market is big enough to justify the effort.

Maybe some other LR-32 users, who would rather do woodworking than building shopmade fixtures, will speak up ? ?

Hans

@TSO_Products Hans I'm interested but primarily due to a pending project July-ish. If you had something available now I'd buy, absent that I will probably whomp up a DIY set.

@DynaGlide Matt - where did you obtain the hex bar stock, MMC?

Thanks,

RMW

@Richard/RMW It's from McMaster Carr.    89845K77 I bought the 2ft length.

The other tricky part is finding a tape that will fit it. .this is the one I used https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I8RKN68/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

If all you are doing are a fixed depth you could cobble together your own jig for the guide rail out of scrap MDF. Line up the router on the LR32 plate where you want it and triple check it's parallel etc. Take some measurements and make your own one off pair for that setup.

Like this:



If I only made cabinets and only used the same hardware I could see having a pair made up for 37mm and 261mm ready to go.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2020, 02:24 PM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2020, 07:23 AM »
Question for the group: I'm at the step of attaching my leg levelers. Here are the ones I purchased: Desunia Cabinet levelers

I've found mixed opinions on the function of the leg levelers. Some guides say to have them straddle the side panel to take on the load whereas others have firmly argued frameless cabinets transfer the load to the back and to the wall and other joined boxes once installed. Two of my boxes are not screwed to other boxes. The front to back set back I can work out it's the side of the box to the leveler I would like advice on. Another consideration is some of the ends will get applied end panels (and side toe kicks as well) so I'm assuming on those boxes the leveler gets placed closer to the edge of the side of the box.

As always pics are appreciated if you have them.

Matt

Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2020, 07:46 AM »
Check out the attached PDF file, Matt.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #23 on: June 24, 2020, 08:00 AM »
Check out the attached PDF file, Matt.   [smile]

That sure is handy and confirms what I was thinking. .if you aren't going to see the side of a cabinet put the leveler right near the edges with proper front setback whereas if there's an applied end panel, account for the 3/4" thickness of that and shoot for the same setback as the front to back on those shown sides. I had also planned on mitering the toe kicks where they meet on the ends.

Thanks Willy
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Offline xedos

  • Posts: 482
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2020, 09:43 AM »
Looking good.

I'm surprised with all that TSO gear that you're still using a Betterly and Makita connectors to join the rails.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2020, 09:56 AM »
Looking good.

I'm surprised with all that TSO gear that you're still using a Betterly and Makita connectors to join the rails.

That's a fair point. If Hans @TSO_Products wants to send me some. . .until then the Makita + Betterley is deadly accurate and solid and I'd have to deal with selling them on to re-coup some of my money.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 329
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #26 on: June 24, 2020, 12:34 PM »
@DynaGlide: I don't know if you have any use for this, but here's a useful trick I learned a few years ago. Glue a bullseye level on the back of your drill. Make it so that the air bubble is in the centre ring when the drill bit is perfectly plump. That way you can look at the level to see if you are drilling straight or not.




Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #27 on: June 24, 2020, 04:46 PM »
@hdv That's a good tip. I'll do that to my Milwaukee drills.

And now drum roll. . .







Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #28 on: June 26, 2020, 01:47 AM »
Late night here. .just finished up a little while ago installing some recessed lighting:



« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 01:50 AM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #29 on: June 26, 2020, 09:28 AM »
Good progress, Matt.  Guess you really had a long day.   [big grin]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #30 on: June 26, 2020, 09:56 AM »
Good progress, Matt.  Guess you really had a long day.   [big grin]

And as par for course, the circuit I had to turn off to work on the lighting included the attic light. There's nothing quite like sitting up on a 2x board in the dark at midnight with a headlight running wire. At least it was nice and cool.

I think I'll go on a supply run this afternoon and work on the doors/drawers we discussed yesterday. Countertop materials won't be in until mid July.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline thudchkr

  • Posts: 176
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2020, 08:03 PM »
@DynaGlide - your project pictures along with pointers from the likes of Sparktrician are a big helpo for many facing this kind of work.

Your LR-32 Hex bar extension pictures the same solution we developed last year when we ran into the same limitations with the short standard bars and the awkward tightening/releasing of the FESTOOL attachment. We hesitated to put it into production because we were not sure if the market is big enough to justify the effort.

Maybe some other LR-32 users, who would rather do woodworking than building shopmade fixtures, will speak up ? ?

Hans

I’d be interested in getting something as well. Would be even slicker if it had multiple stops so you didn’t have to shift the stop for your next row of holes. I’m typically boring three sets of holes when I install my drawer slides.
Clint

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #32 on: June 29, 2020, 09:20 AM »
I've been putting in 12 hr days on the weekends. .yesterday was another one. I spent most of the morning assembling drawer boxes then went over to Home Depot in the afternoon to get supplies to paint. I wrapped up around 10 last night with the cabinets moved up from the basement to the 2nd floor. I don't need to tell anyone how dumb doing that by myself was.

This morning at 7:30 I hear the delivery truck pulling up with my 2.5" Maple. When I go out to help unload I saw the 1/2" sheet of Medex MDF which I had ordered from a separate supplier was already sitting outside my garage. And I thought I got going early. Jeez.

1/2" Prefinished Maple


Straight line


Ripped down off pencil line since it's a narrow rip


Cross cut using the TSO goodies


Everything came out perfect


If I were a smart person I would have ran the drawer bottom groove on the 8' sheet prior to ripping. Apparently I'm not a smart person. Vac Sys to the rescue:





Throw in the mortises and edge banding and presto, drawer sides and fronts


Back to the TSO goodies for 6 perfectly sized drawer bottoms




Now if I were a 'really' smart person I would've bought the drawer sides ready to go and spent the extra $40. I could've saved half a day had I done that. The reason I didn't is I was worried I'd mess something up and not be able to get more material whereas with my 1/2" sheet of ply I had extra. I'm still buying the ready to go sides next time, that was too tedious.

A little primer


A little paint


And bingo


Now off to read about how to setup this Freud T&G set and work out my door and drawer faces. .

Matt



Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2020, 09:43 PM »
Freud T&G set figured out. It took some fiddling and a wasted board or two but I got 'er done. For the panels I used 1/2" Medex Moister Resistant MDF and back cut it to fit into the grooves and be almost flush to the back of the door frames. Since I didn't plan ahead to use space balls or what not other alternatives, I'm debating a dab of glue in the middle of each panel top and bottom. I started the panels off as a really tight fit but adjusted them until they were a little looser so I could slide them into position (even gap) after clamping the rails and stiles together.

Also used one of @tjbnwi Tom's tricks to clean up the drawer dominos today with the MFK700:





I left them a touch proud, mainly because I like to feel them.

Here's my super secret setup technique for the T&G router bit set. Once you have a groove done and you do it for 6mm. .slip a 6mm Domino into the groove and line it up with the tongue bit to get the height bang on.





Cutting my door parts using the Dewalt saw on the Rigid stand with my personal modifications. Every part came out dead square and exactly sized. I put two MFT/3 stops on the fence: one for the rails and another for the stiles. And LED shadow on the blade is better than any laser on the Kapex.  [tongue]





Rebating (Rabbeting?) the panels was easy as pie with this setup:











That's all for now. I'll probably have to put a stop to any further work until after my trip to the Cape on Wednesday for a much needed vacation.

Matt

Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #34 on: June 30, 2020, 08:33 AM »
Great progress, Matt!  Enjoy the Cape!   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #35 on: July 01, 2020, 05:44 AM »


I was able to sneak some time in yesterday. Now I can relax a bit easier knowing it worked out.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #36 on: July 15, 2020, 11:52 AM »
I'm home from vacation and finding pockets of time here and there to work on the office again. I glued up and mounted the hinges on the other two doors.

After finding the high spot in the room using a laser level and getting all of the boxes positioned and level to each other, I took the outlet cover off and threaded in some extra long screws into the outlet and put a dab of grease on the heads of the screws. I then very carefully butted the PC cabinet up to the screws to transfer their location to the back of the cabinet. From there it was drilling some holes, careful cutting and luckily I nailed it on my first try. I used an outlet extender to keep the outlet protected.









The laser level has been invaluable along with the leveling legs on each box.





I still have to secure the standalone 36" cabinet but I'm taking a break to make sure I get it perfect since it sets the alignment for the countertop to the other wall.

The particle board core, laminate, and edging all arrived this morning. I'm hoping to tackle that this weekend.

This project along with the shutters I did last year and the engine rebuilds I did a quite a few years back have reaffirmed my "Sure, I can do that" mentality. It's just figuring out a bunch of little things as you go. Fake it til you make it.

Matt
« Last Edit: July 18, 2020, 07:01 PM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1010
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #37 on: July 15, 2020, 05:33 PM »
Matt, you've done a fine job so far.  It's going to  look great when you are finished.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2020, 07:01 PM »
Thanks @Rob Z . It's a learning curve that's for sure.

Today I got going on the countertop. I took the advice of @tjbnwi and made a template. I couldn't get the drywall shims without ordering them in so I grabbed a 4x8 sheet of masonite and ripped it into strips. Starting with the walls I scribed and fit, got my front and side reveals where I wanted and hot glued everything together. Then I took the two templates to some particleboard in the garage and set to copying them with my jigsaw. It turned out pretty darn good for a first attempt at something I've never done before.

I'll build up the counters tomorrow, rout in the channels for the countertop connectors, and laminate them.







Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2020, 07:40 PM »
I took the outlet cover off and threaded in some extra long screws into the outlet and put a dab of grease on the heads of the screws. I then very carefully butted the PC cabinet up to the screws to transfer their location to the back of the cabinet.

It's looking good Matt... [big grin]

FWIW...when I need to transfer the location of threaded bolts/screws/holes, I just use these and just tap the piece of material with my palm. It leaves a nice small center punch location. These are all easily made on a bench grinder to whatever size you need.




Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1010
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #40 on: July 18, 2020, 08:30 PM »
Matt, sometimes the "old ways" are better than the new ways.  You can't go wrong with a template.  I think it was about mid-2000's when one of my stone fabricators showed up on-site with a computer to measure for the counters.  The setup included an articulating arm and multiple data points were recorded.  When the counters came, it turned out they didn't fit and the installers had that resigned look of "here we go again".  In talking with them, they told me this was the new way of doing things and they always have to make adjustments.  [blink]  [big grin] As much as the computer gizmo cost, you would think it would work better than the old way of making templates. It wasn't !



Thanks @Rob Z . It's a learning curve that's for sure.

Today I got going on the countertop. I took the advice of @tjbnwi and made a template. I couldn't get the drywall shims without ordering them in so I grabbed a 4x8 sheet of masonite and ripped it into strips. Starting with the walls I scribed and fit, got my front and side reveals where I wanted and hot glued everything together. Then I took the two templates to some particleboard in the garage and set to copying them with my jigsaw. It turned out pretty darn good for a first attempt at something I've never done before.





Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1451
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #41 on: July 18, 2020, 09:01 PM »
If you don’t want to try to make transfer screws, they are readily available online. Here’s a selection from Amazon. For our purposes, cheaper imports seem to be good enough

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=transfer+screw+set&sprefix=transfer+screw&ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_14

Ron

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #42 on: July 18, 2020, 09:49 PM »
Looks fantastic, Matt!  That counter top fit is as close to perfect as you can get!

Agree on the laser.  One of the best tools for any home projects.  I just moved and hung pictures and the laser made getting them aligned easier than I’ve ever done.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #43 on: July 22, 2020, 07:43 AM »
@Cheese @rvieceli Thank you for the tips on transfer screws. I think my grease trick worked just as well for this situation.

@Rob Z

I think you're right. Nothing wrong with tried and true.

@neilc I hope you're settling in okay. Moving is hard enough, doing it during a pandemic must be even harder.

I was able to get a bit more done. It's hard working in spurts in between family and work. But that's how it goes.

I set the two countertops upside down and where they needed to be to start on the fastener locations:





The Zipbolt UT 10.500 I'm using call for a 35mm hole bored 20mm deep on each countertop. So I put my 1010 to use with the LR32 hinge boring bit.



Then it was simply routing a path to the edge.



My laminate sheet came in a 5x12 sheet so I broke it down with the TS55 and a solid surface blade:





All trimmed up and ready to go







That last picture is how it sits currently in the office. I haven't put the miter bolt/countertop fasteners in. My question to the group. .when I do the fasteners, if I apply glue to the mating countertop surfaces, this countertop is not coming out of the room unless it's with a sawzall. So do I glue it or not?

Thanks,
Matt
« Last Edit: July 22, 2020, 08:05 AM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 347
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #44 on: July 22, 2020, 08:28 AM »
I’d glue it Matt. If you ever need to remove it it’s unlikely to be repurposed in exactly the same configuration. If you cut it along the glue line the two panels would still be useable with the cabinets below.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #45 on: July 22, 2020, 09:56 AM »

The Zipbolt UT 10.500 I'm using call for a 35mm hole bored 20mm deep on each countertop. So I put my 1010 to use with the LR32 hinge boring bit.


Good call on using the 1010 for the hole pockets...that takes care of any depth issues.  [smile]

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #46 on: July 22, 2020, 11:10 AM »
Matt, if you choose to NOT glue the tops together, you can use a flexible seam sealer to fill and conceal the gap.  Being flexible, it will move with any movement between the tops (if there is any).  If you choose to disassemble the tops at some point in the future, they will come apart easily with no damage to either.  SWMBO might find that a better option...   [big grin]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #47 on: July 22, 2020, 11:35 AM »
Too late @Sparktrician . I knew about the Seamfil product but in the end I felt glue was the right way to go on this one. Hopefully this counter never needs to come out because if it does that means removing the bookshelves and crown that I plan on building on top. So permanent it is  [big grin]



What I will likely do is when it comes time to build the bookshelves I'll have one of the sides overlap the seam.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5228
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #48 on: July 22, 2020, 11:40 AM »
Looks like it turned out okay but wondering why you didn’t spread the bolts out farther? And no Dominos?

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #49 on: July 22, 2020, 11:47 AM »
@Michael Kellough - any farther apart and I wouldn't be able to access them from inside the cabinet. Dominos would not work here - These two tops are captured by walls within a room. Very snug fit.

The front half of the seam is as flush as I could possibly hope for with what I had to work with. The back half I'll just cover up with bookshelves.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #50 on: July 22, 2020, 12:13 PM »
Too late @Sparktrician . I knew about the Seamfil product but in the end I felt glue was the right way to go on this one. Hopefully this counter never needs to come out because if it does that means removing the bookshelves and crown that I plan on building on top. So permanent it is  [big grin]

What I will likely do is when it comes time to build the bookshelves I'll have one of the sides overlap the seam.

Looking good, Matt!  SWMBO had better be all smiles when you get this one done...   [big grin]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5228
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #51 on: July 22, 2020, 12:33 PM »
@Michael Kellough - any farther apart and I wouldn't be able to access them from inside the cabinet. Dominos would not work here - These two tops are captured by walls within a room. Very snug fit.

The front half of the seam is as flush as I could possibly hope for with what I had to work with. The back half I'll just cover up with bookshelves.

Got it. As in, I get it now.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #52 on: July 23, 2020, 02:52 PM »
I set to tackling the edging on the countertop today. With all of my prep work the corners are all square which helped a great deal in getting the pieces to fit.



Once you have the angles and lengths cut it's as simple as applying glue to the MDF backing, lining up using your finger to feel for any areas it catches the edging, and strapping tape to secure it in place. To get the seamless look I'll have to go back with Seamfil to hide any dark lines. They don't tell you that in the "look how easy this is" product video but it is in the written instructions from Formica.







Unfortunately I hit a snag with the last section. When I did the dry fit I noticed a section about 15-20" long that had the backing appear to protrude past the laminated part of the edging. Upon further inspection and a call to Formica. . .they cut it wrong. I thought about using it and hoping the Seamfil would fix it but I decided it'd annoy me to no end if it didn't work out so I have a replacement claim in the works with my supplier. This is how it ought to look for a dry fit:



And this is the defective part:



It's a shame and I was hoping to wrap the counter up today. Good thing I'm working for myself. That'll probably set me back 3 weeks on the counter if the last order of this stuff is any indication on lead times. I have plenty of other stuff to work on.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #53 on: August 03, 2020, 01:32 PM »
I keep chipping away at this office any free time I get.

A bit off topic: Our attic fan died on us who knows when. You'd think with how much I've been up there I'd have noticed but it wasn't until I was doing my final cleanup and putting insulation back in place last week that I realized it wasn't running on a 100 degree day. An hour or so educating myself on YouTube University and a trip to Home Depot and I set to fixing.

Out with the old:





And in with the new:





It may be confirmation bias but it sure does feel nicer upstairs.

Anyway back to the office.

SeamFil color matched applied on the right vs nothing on left:



It really does a nice job cleaning up the look of everything:



I was able to build my drawer faces and applied end panels in the same shaker style using maple frames:







The end panels are sort of like picture frames. Rabbeted in the back to clamp the MDF to the cabinet carcass when I drive screws into the frame of the end panel from inside the cabinets.

My walls taper in a straight line bottom to top so I used my TS55 to scribe the frames



With fitment of everything confirmed I started filling my mistakes with this product I researched when I built the shutters last year. It's pretty easy to work with and the can will outlast me.



I'm happy to be in the home stretch. Work is picking up so I'm trying my best to get it done. I'm hoping to start with primer and paint soon.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5228
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #54 on: August 03, 2020, 03:52 PM »


So that’s why they say electrical connections should be inside boxes, preferably steel.  [eek]

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #55 on: August 03, 2020, 07:17 PM »


So that’s why they say electrical connections should be inside boxes, preferably steel.  [eek]

Yep. It was (and is now) covered with a metal cover. Picture was taken with it removed.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 469
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #56 on: August 03, 2020, 11:17 PM »
@DynaGlide  this is looking really good. 

Did you use Target last year for the finish on your shutters?   I'm curious about spraying lacquer over water putty.  I've read that certain things should not go under lacquer, but it sounds like you've done some research.  I am a fan of the water putty. :-)

The seamfil makes a huge difference.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #57 on: August 04, 2020, 06:41 AM »
@DynaGlide  this is looking really good. 

Did you use Target last year for the finish on your shutters?   I'm curious about spraying lacquer over water putty.  I've read that certain things should not go under lacquer, but it sounds like you've done some research.  I am a fan of the water putty. :-)

The seamfil makes a huge difference.

Thank you @mrFinpgh . I used SW Wall and Wood and ProClassic last year on the shutters. I really didn't like how much I had to thin it and how the sheen turned out. I was going to use the Target coatings primer and EM6500 but I found out a SW store in the area carries Kem Aqua Plus in 1 gallon yesterday. I'm hoping to get that instead and save the Target for something else. Fingers crossed.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #58 on: August 04, 2020, 07:49 AM »
@DynaGlide, that burned wire nut and nicked insulation scared me.   [scared]    Ironically, I had a new roof put on my house yesterday.  I disconnected the old vent fan from inside the attic so the roofers could install the new fan.  In doing so, I found similarly burned wiring inside the box.  Needless to say, I'll be up in the attic shortly to connect the new fan, and it will be done right this time.  Glad it's a rainy day since the attic is most uncomfortable at this time of year. 
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #59 on: August 04, 2020, 11:05 AM »
@DynaGlide  and  @Sparktrician

I'm not familiar with that style of fan, where does it go and what does it vent to?  What would be the cause for the high current draw and the burned twist connector? Bad bearings in the fan? Seems if it's bad bearings, then that problem could raise its ugly head again sometime. That'd make me nervous.  [scared]

Locally ridge vents, plain static vents (they look terrible) or large attic fans (24"-30" diameter) turning at a low rpm are popular.



Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #60 on: August 04, 2020, 11:24 AM »
@DynaGlide  and  @Sparktrician

I'm not familiar with that style of fan, where does it go and what does it vent to?  What would be the cause for the high current draw and the burned twist connector? Bad bearings in the fan? Seems if it's bad bearings, then that problem could raise its ugly head again sometime. That'd make me nervous.  [scared]

Locally ridge vents, plain static vents (they look terrible) or large attic fans (24"-30" diameter) turning at a low rpm are popular.

@Cheese, the fan type I mentioned are sometimes called mushroom fans.  Here is one example.  There's a small motor inside the dome.  I think the wiring got burned because whoever wired it in used an older type of wire nut that didn't have the spiral spring inside that really digs into the wire and holds the wires together.  I suspect that over time, a high-resistance short developed and caused the heat that burned the wiring.  All that got fixed this morning when I wired in the new fan.  It's up there spinning merrily away, cooling the attic.  (And I'm out of the attic, scrubbed, clean and smelling a whole lot better now.)   [big grin]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

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Offline VictorL

  • Posts: 589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #61 on: August 05, 2020, 09:32 AM »
@DynaGlide - your project pictures along with pointers from the likes of Sparktrician are a big helpo for many facing this kind of work.

Your LR-32 Hex bar extension pictures the same solution we developed last year when we ran into the same limitations with the short standard bars and the awkward tightening/releasing of the FESTOOL attachment. We hesitated to put it into production because we were not sure if the market is big enough to justify the effort.

Maybe some other LR-32 users, who would rather do woodworking than building shopmade fixtures, will speak up ? ?

Hans

I definitely want longer bars.  If you use LR-32 just for trivial support pins, it's overkill, but for installing slides it "must have" item. 

Thes

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #62 on: September 04, 2020, 05:00 PM »
@tjbnwi or anyone else:

I started spraying Kem Aqua Plus surfacer today. I have two coats on and I think I have the application down but I'm running into an issue.



After it's had time to dry there's some bleeding through the Surfacer on some of the Maple pieces.





It's worse on some vs the others. I'm applying the Surfacer wet like a lake and hand sanding w/ 220 between coats. This is only on the Maple frames not on the MDF panels.

I read somewhere I can let it cure overnight and hit it again and it might take care of it before moving onto top coats. Any advice? Not looking to switch to Kilz or equivalent I'd like to stay with the KA+ system as it is designed to work together.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6405
  • No longer in Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #63 on: September 04, 2020, 05:09 PM »
@DynaGlide,

Honestly, I’ve never seen this before.

Wash those areas with denatured alcohol tomorrow. Scuff sand, reshoot.

You may be putting it on to heavy, 5 mils wet is where you want to be.

Any pieces not shot pre-clean with DNA (if you can get Prepsol 3919S or 3812S reducer they work well also). I think this is a contamination issue. 

If you had to do any filling are these areas that were filled? If so what filler did you use? KA does not play well with Timbermate fillers.

Tom

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #64 on: September 04, 2020, 06:24 PM »
@tjbnwi Upon further inspection all the maple has the spots to some degree. There's no filling in the areas where it's happening. It doesn't happen at all with the mdf panels.

I'm stumped. I'll try cleaning and scuffing and reshooting and see what happens.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6405
  • No longer in Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #65 on: September 04, 2020, 06:31 PM »
I believe it is a contaminate. I've never seen the issue on maple, we use a ton of it (on each build).

Tom

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #66 on: September 04, 2020, 11:01 PM »
@tjbnwi Tom this is silver maple if that matters. I think I'm experiencing tannin bleed through. The wood was raw and sanded before I started. If it comes to it can I apply bin shellac under either the Surfacer or the top coats of the KA+?
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6405
  • No longer in Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #67 on: September 04, 2020, 11:04 PM »
Use Seal Coat. It is a dewaxed shellac. Hopefully you wont need it. I've used Surfacer over oak with no issues.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Zinsser-1-qt-SealCoat-Wood-Sealer-824H/202070456

Tom

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #68 on: September 05, 2020, 03:38 PM »
@tjbnwi I hope you're in for a laugh. I went to the Depot to try to find the Denatured alcohol. They didn't have it so I said screw it and put another coat on. This time I pulled out the mil gauge. Apparently my definition of "wet like a lake" is more in line with "dry like a desert." The mil gauge barely registered a 1 when I checked with what I was laying down.

I'm going to go ahead and say that was my issue. I got a nice thick coat around 4 mil on all the pieces. I'll have to re-do the backs of the doors before moving on.

Instagram @matts.garage

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6405
  • No longer in Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #69 on: September 05, 2020, 04:25 PM »
Hopefully this solved the issue.

Tom

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #70 on: September 06, 2020, 07:50 PM »
All smiles over here @tjbnwi Tom. My biggest issues were the suicidal bugs flying through my spray and some cool weather micro foaming this morning but I worked through it.

For someone that does this as a hobby figuring it out as I go I'm really pleased.



Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6405
  • No longer in Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #71 on: September 06, 2020, 08:07 PM »
I've said these 2 things many times;

Finishing s the harest thing any woodworker will ever do.

Spary with your ears, not your eyes.

Sand with 240 Garnat Net if you have it.

If something got on the finish between topcoats, denibb it----DO NOT SAND BETWEEN TOP COATS!!!!!!!!!!!

Tom

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3585
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #72 on: September 14, 2020, 09:37 AM »
I've said these 2 things many times;

Finishing s the harest thing any woodworker will ever do.

Spary with your ears, not your eyes.

Sand with 240 Garnat Net if you have it.

If something got on the finish between topcoats, denibb it----DO NOT SAND BETWEEN TOP COATS!!!!!!!!!!!

Tom

All good advice.
Finishing will humble you faster than your partner ever will.
Tim

Offline JeremyH.

  • Posts: 316
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #73 on: September 28, 2020, 07:12 PM »
Ok I haven't been lurking much lately, posting zero...

And I admit I've just been looking at pictures. Congratulations on getting rid of that closet folding-abomination.

I have to throw a major curve ball in. MAJOR.

Monitor arms. It doesn't look like you planned for them. I'll never live without them again. There's nothing better than opening up the desk space and have ergo viewing. If I moved my office into a room with beautiful cabinets, I'd hack them up any way necessary to implement monitor arms. They need a little space behind them sometimes for how they adjust. At this point I doubt you have a wait to accommodate but truthfully you're obviously very crafty so I wholly suspect I could be very surprised.
CXS;RO150;ETS EC 125/3 EQ;CT26e  KSS400;MT55cc;DDF 40

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #74 on: October 21, 2020, 05:36 PM »
I know it's been a while but I just put some of the finishing touches on this week. Baseboard and shoe moulding and swapping some outlets. I just realized I haven't posted any updated pics. I've been using the office since mid August and working on it as I could.

This is what I'll call Phase 1. Next I need to replace the double doors leading to the bedroom with sliding doors then after Christmas I'll build and install bookshelves to go on top of the desk. They will have their own lighting.





After scribing this panel in I made it removable along with the toekick for hiding wires:









Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #75 on: October 21, 2020, 05:52 PM »
Great job, Matt.  Is SWMBO happy with the results?   [big grin]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #76 on: October 21, 2020, 10:28 PM »
Nice work!  You put a ton of work into that and the results look great!

Congrats, Matt!

Offline mkasdin

  • Posts: 475
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #77 on: October 22, 2020, 03:33 AM »
@tjbnwi I hope you're in for a laugh. I went to the Depot to try to find the Denatured alcohol. They didn't have it so I said screw it and put another coat on. This time I pulled out the mil gauge. Apparently my definition of "wet like a lake" is more in line with "dry like a desert." The mil gauge barely registered a 1 when I checked with what I was laying down.

I'm going to go ahead and say that was my issue. I got a nice thick coat around 4 mil on all the pieces. I'll have to re-do the backs of the doors before moving on.
denatured alcohol for cleaning is no longer sold. Now labeled as cooking fuel. Amazon sells it by the quart. I ordered 4 quarts, so I should be good for awhile.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #78 on: October 30, 2020, 09:17 AM »
Great job, Matt.  Is SWMBO happy with the results?   [big grin]

Thank you Willy! Yes she is. I'm still a little taken back that I pulled this off as my first cabinetry project.

1) Never remodeled anything  before
2) Never built a real cabinet or door or drawer outside of Greg Paolini's class
3) Never built a countertop or scribed anything before
4) Never had to paint anything before that had to look this nice. .and first time with SW KA+

There is just no replacement for experience. I already have some thoughts on things I might do differently.


Nice work!  You put a ton of work into that and the results look great!

Congrats, Matt!

Thanks neil!
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #79 on: February 20, 2021, 08:29 AM »


Hello all,

I'm hoping to get some design advice for the bookshelves. I was originally going to do lighting but have scrapped that in favor of simplicity so I can get them done. I'll save learning the ins and outs of LEDs for another day.

Here is the general idea of what I'm after. The model is outdated but gets the point across:



I'd like to avoid painting so I'm looking at either a white TFL material or melamine from the box store. If I go Melamine I have to deal with PB core. If I order in a TFL I can pick the substrate, I believe MDF.

My thought is to make each unit separate, i.e. two sides and a full size back. Then when I install screw them all together in place and to the studs in the wall through the backs. I'd cover the exposed front edges with trim and brush paint in place. They need to be a few inches shy of the ceiling to allow for crown molding (not sure how much there either, never done crown before).

I'd likely make the shelves adjustable with shelf pin holes. Either bore them full length or within designated ranges (i.e. 6 holes either direction of each shelf location).

The countertop is 24" deep. The bookshelf units I'm targeting 12" deep including the entire carcass. The opening over the right desk area will be wide enough to accommodate my wife's 27" iMac with some room to spare.

Looking for advice from anyone who's been there, done that.

Thanks,
Matt
« Last Edit: February 20, 2021, 08:33 AM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1451
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #80 on: February 20, 2021, 08:55 AM »
@DynaGlide

Matt your design looks good. But I'm a big fan of units over a countertop that DO NOT continue down to the counter surface. Suggest you think about making the shelves more like an upper kitchen cabinet with shelves and perhaps mount them on French cleats. It will give you more flexibility in the future, should you decide to change things.

Ron

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #81 on: February 20, 2021, 01:31 PM »
@DynaGlide

Matt your design looks good. But I'm a big fan of units over a countertop that DO NOT continue down to the counter surface. Suggest you think about making the shelves more like an upper kitchen cabinet with shelves and perhaps mount them on French cleats. It will give you more flexibility in the future, should you decide to change things.

Ron


Concur with Ron wholeheartedly!  Leave the work surface clear of any vertical supports for the shelving by using a french cleat system to support the cabinets.  Set the bottom shelf at 60" AFF to provide headroom for leaning in while working, for servicing printers, and for large monitors. 
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 1046
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #82 on: February 20, 2021, 02:54 PM »
I think the proposed bookshelves might be too much for the room/desk. You might consider at least mounting them on the wall to give plenty of open space on the desk below. I'd feel claustrophobic working with the bookshelves sitting the desk. I like the overall design and the formica tops. They look good.

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #83 on: February 20, 2021, 04:58 PM »
Matt - I'm going against the other feedback!  I'd recommend you paint them instead of going with the melamine.  The lowers look great with the painted finish, frame and panel sides, etc.    You have the tools, and the experience.  Don't make a dynamite workspace turn 'Ikea' with melamine.

I think you should continue that 'look' from the desk cabinets on the uppers, even with the need to paint them.  Plus I think it improves the resale on the home in the future. 

Agree with the others on keeping them off the counter top.  And I'd at least 'plan and build' for LED light strips that could be inset under the bottom of the wall cabinet.  Lee Valley has some really simple guides for selection of the right components.  You might think about a set of doors on one cabinet - maybe the set on the right side - to hide some clutter, but also give you access to the wall for wiring of the LED's in the future.






Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #84 on: February 20, 2021, 05:37 PM »
It seems unanimous that I shouldn't run the bookshelves all the way down. Unfortunately, as is usually the case, that's not "how the people on pinterest" do it. If I have them go all the way down I was going to do them 12" deep, no bottoms so the counter is still exposed, and give the right desk area a 36" wide open area. She's pretty adamant on this. You have to please the client if you want to stay in business, right?

@neilc Don't you go talking me into more painting! Even though I know you're right that it would look best. Compared to the doors doing the bookshelves would be really simple. Darn it.

I'll do some more looking into lighting. If I wanted lighted shelves that would mean ditching adjustable, no?

For the backs should I do 1/2" applied to full size of the carcasses, attached with dominos and screws? When I did the bottom cabinets I did stretchers/nailers, set the 1/4" backs in enough to fit the 3/4" stretcher behind.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2021, 05:43 PM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #85 on: February 20, 2021, 06:01 PM »
I'll do some more looking into lighting. If I wanted lighted shelves that would mean ditching adjustable, no?

Nope, look at Phantom Lighting for some solutions. You can incorporate the items/standards you need now and then add the lighting later.

https://www.phantomlighting.com/products/cabinet-lighting/

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #86 on: February 20, 2021, 06:20 PM »
For the backs / hanging...

Consider 2" rails across the top under the top shelf.   Do the same at the bottom, assuming you are floating them on the wall and not going to the desk.  Inset a 1/4" panel to those rails as well as on the sides.  Those give you rails to screw into the wall rather than dealing with French cleats.  Much cleaner approach and you give up minimal depth.

I just searched for 'built in bookshelves above desk' on Pinterest.  Many of the ones I saw are above the surface.  They look SO much better, particularly on a smaller space, which is what you have there.

@Cheese - those are really cool shelving lights!  Love the idea of the adjustability and zero exposed wires.


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #87 on: February 21, 2021, 09:05 AM »
@Cheese - those are really cool shelving lights!  Love the idea of the adjustability and zero exposed wires.

Neil that's one of the manufacturers...I thought I'd saved the other one in the computer but I can't find it now.  [sad]

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #88 on: February 22, 2021, 11:18 AM »
@Cheese - those are really cool shelving lights!  Love the idea of the adjustability and zero exposed wires.

Neil that's one of the manufacturers...I thought I'd saved the other one in the computer but I can't find it now.  [sad]

@Cheese are these the guys?

https://www.vltcorp.com/product/essentialedge/
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #89 on: February 22, 2021, 12:03 PM »
Hey @DynaGlide they could be the one...I remember that it was a simple installation requiring just a couple of parts. However I also thought that screws were not part of the solution but a couple of retractible spring pins like on the original DF 500.

RSL (Roberts Step Lite) also produces a "Wireless Adjustable Shelf Light".

https://robertssteplite.com/led/

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #90 on: February 23, 2021, 12:27 PM »
@Cheese Thanks for the info. None of those manufacturers are forthcoming with how to buy without going through a design consultant. Probably a sign they're outside my budget.

After a few rounds of back and forth I think I've narrowed down a design that pleases everyone. She gets the full size bookshelf, centered on the wall. Then we get open areas above both our computers. The middle bookshelf is ~30" wide with 28.5" shelves. The two side wall hung units are about 22" wide each. Ideally they'd all be wall units but you work with what you've got. It's still being tweaked. I may make that middle unit a little narrower.

Instagram @matts.garage

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Offline Packard

  • Posts: 415
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #91 on: February 23, 2021, 01:27 PM »
It looks really nice.  And probably as much work as installing a new kitchen.

There is a (new to me) type of hardware for joining seams on counter tops.  It not only draws the counters tightly together it allows form micro-adjustments to level the two pieces.

I have not seen any videos on how to  use this, but I  did see a photo showing its use.  I will try it on my next countertop.  The detail photos shown in the link give an idea how it works. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/174392206561?_trkparms=ispr%3D1&amdata=enc%3AAQAFAAACMBaobrjLl8XobRIiIML1V4Imu%252Fn%252BzU5L90Z278x5ickkKQ3D59%252FksmrAqH9M4NgB3wXh%252F5wkeKdvgWRG1dNUFVKfV1EKsXQs79O2XKyaeJpv5Oc52yIiDWhMGUAdqVGqbd5887XYsTnBAKErXaQNNMqplRvyz9YXNROMQqiNWjcB%252BogAukGpmJ3DnEfmyomionpY7d%252BnyfNr5AgkTcj5IUq6b3Q5q29d99HYbH7mD4c176JVO2odgCbhMA8jvjUFlfa86j5%252FtRIPLzoao14Mh3szssg6h%252BnYfTpiFqsjBl7JNdIwSAOqi56O%252B5fai4qRW1D2J79TPl0PqmxMzqpD%252FaNCPyEj8gaATnoEgq2Pjvlb7aUjsWPL06b7045ojH2WaYEkEUCfaVBd8Uej4eePvKEs33nN9V8tcXssD3jZ4G%252BXXjb%252BuywsYelw5REnbbXuhPejOfY7PtVnvgwwX%252FuPQjLlPZC1yZWdIR4lev%252BO6lI1lujOjQXIoveSckO8lOQcsVUuSCGeCVeygFBZfNvhY1nSfTy5grkznkQxteMILS7NPTodtGUojtZGau65yA075vGohexaAnvqNWkZNgeJZ5zKFrPxtOFhJ4RndDr5wAffDo85QSOtFsQgLCbev6w6n0wxncNWctN8J0%252FmmOUWMy5HQpBZSX23RyjH12%252Fpxe6S3Jcr8Yqrdis8mR6%252BcZjLZcu8T6Frp58M88DfxUUsLgyz9Z%252FvBqeqIrOoVsWBH%252BOp%7Ccksum%3A174392206561fe04d6e6df134ebbacbcd77254210472%7Campid%3APL_CLK%7Cclp%3A3268220&chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=174392206561&targetid=1098102009964&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9003433&poi=&campaignid=11774733487&mkgroupid=113829509425&rlsatarget=pla-1098102009964&abcId=9300474&merchantid=6296724&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy4KEhNCA7wIVBDiGCh2HIgo_EAQYBCABEgJqPPD_BwE

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #92 on: February 24, 2021, 09:25 AM »
I finally nailed down the reason for the 'bookshelf' in the middle going full length to the countertop was to semi hide wiring for the printer. So I said, what if I give you a center cabinet with a pull out shelf to hold the printer and I put an outlet up there and a power strip to hold any devices you want to charge. I think that worked. I can put some access holes from the center cabinet to the shelf units on either side to accommodate Sonos bookshelf speakers too.



Thoughts?
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 469
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #93 on: March 03, 2021, 09:35 PM »
I am enjoying watching the evolution of this project as you work through it with your spouse.  The design has come along nicely.  Your approach w/ the doors and slide out tray for the printer should work very well.  I think it will look better this way, too.

Are you planning to trim the adjoining side panels with 1.5" material, or make something wider?  Or just butt together?

Something about white melamine looks slightly off to me sometimes.. it's almost too white.  I used it for my kitchen cabinets (on the interiors) but it's not something I'd like to look at for long periods of time.  Depending on what's nearby, you might be able to get something with a slightly less stark color.

I built all my non-drawer cabinets with adjustable shelves for my kitchen.  So, 10 cabinets with 3 or 2 adjustable shelves each.  I think we have maybe adjusted one of them in the past four years.  It's a nice option to have, but playing with dimmable leds in the cabinet would be more fun if you had to choose. [big grin].  My wife really enjoys adjusting the under-shelf lighting to set a mood.   8) The adjustable LED systems look very cool, but I'm guessing that comes at a big premium.

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #94 on: March 03, 2021, 10:09 PM »
Thanks for continuing to open this for discussion, Matt!


I like this better.  I’m not personally a big fan of a wall size bookcase, but you and your wife both being in there must need a lot of storage.  If it is a small room, it does make the room seem even smaller.  I just googled ‘office desk with floating shelves’ and found quite a few very interesting designs that definitely open up a room. 


On the printer, why not put the printer on the lower cabinets?  Only asking because a lot of printers get to be pretty deep, meaning deeper than a 12” wall cabinet.  That would make wiring simpler and might accommodate the option of a ‘pull-out’ drawer for easy scanning, etc. 


What did you decide on melamine vs frame and panel?












 -

Offline simonh

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 153
  • Hobbyist / Maker of the VCS-R
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #95 on: March 04, 2021, 03:27 AM »
Something about white melamine looks slightly off to me sometimes.. it's almost too white.  I used it for my kitchen cabinets (on the interiors) but it's not something I'd like to look at for long periods of time.  Depending on what's nearby, you might be able to get something with a slightly less stark color.

I use Egger U708 light grey for all cabinet carcasses nowadays. Not at stark as the white and doesn't look dirty as easily.
-Simon

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1451
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #96 on: March 04, 2021, 06:54 AM »
I'm with neilc on the printer for a couple of reasons. The size he mentions is one. You'll be locked into something small.

Putting the printer unit in the base cabinet gives you more room and frees up desk real estate. The other thing is think about using it. With the higher level unit you will most likely have to stand up to retrieve print outs, the lower unit will allow you to remain seated and just grab the stuff. It is also easier to load items to scan if you have an all in one unit.

Ron 

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #97 on: March 04, 2021, 08:12 AM »
I am enjoying watching the evolution of this project as you work through it with your spouse.  The design has come along nicely.  Your approach w/ the doors and slide out tray for the printer should work very well.  I think it will look better this way, too.

Are you planning to trim the adjoining side panels with 1.5" material, or make something wider?  Or just butt together?

Something about white melamine looks slightly off to me sometimes.. it's almost too white.  I used it for my kitchen cabinets (on the interiors) but it's not something I'd like to look at for long periods of time.  Depending on what's nearby, you might be able to get something with a slightly less stark color.

I built all my non-drawer cabinets with adjustable shelves for my kitchen.  So, 10 cabinets with 3 or 2 adjustable shelves each.  I think we have maybe adjusted one of them in the past four years.  It's a nice option to have, but playing with dimmable leds in the cabinet would be more fun if you had to choose. [big grin].  My wife really enjoys adjusting the under-shelf lighting to set a mood.   8) The adjustable LED systems look very cool, but I'm guessing that comes at a big premium.

@mrFinpgh Hi, yes I plan on trimming where they butt together. I was thinking just that: a 1.5" wide strip with a the edges facing eased over.

The lighting I still want to do, I just need to do more research. In order to keep the adjustable shelving I would have to use vertical strips mounted to the sides of each carcass. They get recessed into a groove and installed into an aluminum track with a diffuser cover. I just haven't given it enough thought yet.


Thanks for continuing to open this for discussion, Matt!



On the printer, why not put the printer on the lower cabinets?  Only asking because a lot of printers get to be pretty deep, meaning deeper than a 12” wall cabinet.  That would make wiring simpler and might accommodate the option of a ‘pull-out’ drawer for easy scanning, etc. 


What did you decide on melamine vs frame and panel?


Hi Neil,

I might do that. I have the open corner cabinet with electrical in place that would work well for this. I originally intended on having a desktop PC there but opted for a nice laptop this past Holiday season instead. It plugs right into my work dock and sits on top of the desk. We don't print that often, maybe once a week for my daughter's school, so the inconvenient location wouldn't really matter. I'd still put it on a pull out shelf on slides so I'm not crawling around down there to use it when scanning.

In either case, I'll do the electrical and pull out shelf on the center upper for the reasons I listed above: device charging, speaker wiring.

I think construction wise the wall cabinets will be just like the bottoms except with a top. Rout the 1/4" back panel in 3/4" to allow for nailers/stretchers. I think I'll skip the melamine and opt for unfinished quality ply and paint it to match the doors and drawer faces below. Then the two doors of course will be identical to the ones below.

@rvieceli I think you might be right. The printer we have is pretty compact and has a scanner. It was a Christmas purchase and while it would fit in a 16" upper cabinet, putting it in the bottom might be the way to go.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2021, 09:06 AM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #98 on: March 04, 2021, 10:30 AM »

The lighting I still want to do, I just need to do more research. In order to keep the adjustable shelving I would have to use vertical strips mounted to the sides of each carcass. They get recessed into a groove and installed into an aluminum track with a diffuser cover. I just haven't given it enough thought yet.


I like the vertical lighting solution, that's exactly what I'm going to do for the new kitchen cabinets I'm building.

Here are a couple of links that may trigger some additional ideas for electrification and wire management.

https://www.mockett.com/power-communication-systems/

https://www.mockett.com/grommets-wire-management/


I really like the new built-in wireless charger to eliminate wires & cables.

https://www.mockett.com/power-communication-systems/wireless-charging/wcs9-23s.html






Here's some info on aluminum channels and their covers. The SLIM channel is only 3/8" deep, perfect for pocketing.

https://www.diodeled.com/custom/download/productFile/filename/chromapath-aluminum-channel-specification-sheet.pdf/


Here's another reliable supplier of LED's and accessories. I use the Luxeon LED's for installation in stainless outdoor step lights set in concrete along with MeanWell drivers. I also use MeanWell drivers for all interior LED lighting.

This vendor offers a real low profile aluminum extrusion that's only 8.8 mm tall.

https://www.ledsupply.com/led-heatsinks/1-inch-led-strip-channel?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIw6L57vaW7wIVr1PVCh3J0gQFEAYYByABEgLsB_D_BwE


Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 469
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #99 on: March 05, 2021, 12:46 PM »


@mrFinpgh Hi, yes I plan on trimming where they butt together. I was thinking just that: a 1.5" wide strip with a the edges facing eased over.

The lighting I still want to do, I just need to do more research. In order to keep the adjustable shelving I would have to use vertical strips mounted to the sides of each carcass. They get recessed into a groove and installed into an aluminum track with a diffuser cover. I just haven't given it enough thought yet.


You might give a little consideration to what it will feel like when you're looking into the cabinets and there are vertical lights in there.  In my kitchen I've got LED lights in tracks w/ diffusers in two places:   Recessed into the bottom of floating shelves and attached to the underside of shelves within a faceframed unit.   What I've found is that the floating shelves look good but if you are in another room (e.g. sitting on a chair and looking into the kitchen)  the LEDs become much more directly visible and it isn't the best experience. Functionally they are great, however.

In the face-framed unit (4' wide, 5' tall), the shelves have a 2" wide piece on the front and the strips run directly behind, which means the light source is always shielded a little bit more.  The quality of light tends be a bit more pleasing to the eye and looks better from more angles.

I'm trying to imagine what vertical lighting might look like here and I can see some potential to get an eyeful of LED from a number of angles, even if they are recessed flush w/ the sides of the cabinet and diffused, it could be a bit strong.  I'm not really sure if it would play out that way in reality, but it's worth checking beforehand.  I guess someone with chops could mock up the light sources in fusion, but the real thing might be easier in terms of time.  I'm trying to think of a way you could recess the lights in the frame itself, and aim them towards the back, but it would make your face frame at least another inch or so wider, which probably isn't the look you are after.

I've added a couple photos to illustrate what I'm saying.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2021, 12:58 PM by mrFinpgh »

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #100 on: March 19, 2021, 02:34 PM »
Hello all,

I'm looking to get started on this next week. Here's where the design sits:



I'm a little torn on how to trim the cabinets. Originally I was going to put a 1.5" trim piece to cover where two adjacent shelf units meet. That might look strange if I didn't do something along the top and bottom edges. If I did a face frame, I'd get that 1.5" all around except where the cabinets meet the middle cabinet with doors. I'm tempted to just skip going for the chunky 1.5" look of the shelves and frame and keeping it frameless.

Any tips?

Thanks,
Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #101 on: March 19, 2021, 03:57 PM »
Matt, are you going to do strip or puck lighting under the hanging cabinets?  Might want to consider a false front to conceal the lights such that they don't cause glare into SWMBO's eyes.  Just a thought...   [wink]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #102 on: March 20, 2021, 08:54 AM »
Matt, are you going to do strip or puck lighting under the hanging cabinets?  Might want to consider a false front to conceal the lights such that they don't cause glare into SWMBO's eyes.  Just a thought...   [wink]

@Sparktrician I would like to. I'm a little confused on how to approach the design we're after. Maybe I'm missing something having not really dealt with face frames.

This is what we're after:



I was thinking of building the cabinets frameless then attaching the front 'frame' in pieces after they're hung. Each rail and stile would be 3/4 material, 1.5" wide. That way where two boxes meet it would cover the exposed plywood without extending into the boxes insides. Along the tops and bottoms the rails would extend past the boxes 3/4", like this:



I'm assuming this 3/4" lip would allow me to hide some lighting strips.

That center wider cabinet is going to have two doors. My current thought is to do inset doors and when I bore the hinge holes, subtract off 18mm from the 37mm setback to account for the 'frame' that will be applied.

When it's all done I want the doors, the frame, and the shelves in the same plane. The shelves would be 3/4 ply with a 1.5" maple lip.

Does this all make sense or am I way off?

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #103 on: March 20, 2021, 09:15 AM »
Matt, are you going to do strip or puck lighting under the hanging cabinets?  Might want to consider a false front to conceal the lights such that they don't cause glare into SWMBO's eyes.  Just a thought...   [wink]

@Sparktrician I would like to. I'm a little confused on how to approach the design we're after. Maybe I'm missing something having not really dealt with face frames.

This is what we're after:



I was thinking of building the cabinets frameless then attaching the front 'frame' in pieces after they're hung. Each rail and stile would be 3/4 material, 1.5" wide. That way where two boxes meet it would cover the exposed plywood without extending into the boxes insides. Along the tops and bottoms the rails would extend past the boxes 3/4", like this:



I'm assuming this 3/4" lip would allow me to hide some lighting strips.

That center wider cabinet is going to have two doors. My current thought is to do inset doors and when I bore the hinge holes, subtract off 18mm from the 37mm setback to account for the 'frame' that will be applied.

When it's all done I want the doors, the frame, and the shelves in the same plane. The shelves would be 3/4 ply with a 1.5" maple lip.

Does this all make sense or am I way off?

Matt

@DynaGlide, I think I'd put a 1-1/2" or 2" valence under the cabinets to direct the light down onto the work surface while keeping it out of SWMBO's eyes.  I'd hold the valence against that bottom front of the cabinets, even with the front plane of the cabinets, with the light strips right behind them to move the light as far forward from the wall to make it as useful and shadow-free as possible.  Make sense?
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #104 on: March 20, 2021, 10:17 AM »
Matt, I think this is what Sparky was referring to.

On our kitchen cabinets I added a 2" valence to the BOTTOM of the cabinets to control light spread and keep it out of our eyes while working in the kitchen. The LED strip is approx 1" away from the front of the cabinets so that any chopping/cutting/mixing tasks are thoroughly illuminated. This is a photo showing the inside/back of the valence.




This is the front of the cabinets showing the front of the 2" wide valence that's flush with the front of the cabinets.





Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #105 on: March 20, 2021, 11:12 AM »
Matt - I'd make the rails go all the way across at the top and bottom of the side shelves (where there are no doors.)  for the side shelves, I don't think they need to 1.5" edging on what I assume are adjustable shelves, unless they are carrying significant weight.

With careful measuring, You should be able to build either side cabinet face frame as one piece and the center door top/bottom rails can attached once those are in place.  If your bottom rail is 1.5", you should be OK to hide the LED strip as you have it designed.

Here's an article on typical dimensions for rails / stiles.  https://homeguides.sfgate.com/cabinet-stile-rail-dimensions-94437.html

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1451
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #106 on: March 20, 2021, 11:51 AM »
@DynaGlide I don't see any reason you can't just go frameless on these upper units. Edge band the edges and be done with it. I think they would look fine. I'd also be tempted to leave the doors off and just go with shelves. It would look better IMHO.

As for the lighting, just put an L shaped valence slightly back for the front and side edges to shield the lights. I you want to hide the wring more try giving it a false top just below the cabinet bottom and put in a plywood panel. Make a rabbet or an extra rail to mount it too. Mount the LEDS to the panel and route the wiring underneath.

Ron

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #107 on: March 20, 2021, 01:13 PM »
Thank you everyone for the feedback. Those pictures help a lot @Cheese .

@neilc  The whole idea is that everything including the rails and stiles of the face frames and the shelf lips are the same width. The only thing that would be wider would be the door parts (those are 2.5" shaker rails and stiles to match the base cabinets).

I agree with the long rails and single piece face frames with careful measurements.

Some are suggesting I make the valance larger up to 2" but that'd throw the symmetry off which is why I'm asking if I can get away with 3/4" overhang to cover up some LEDs if I go that route.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #108 on: March 20, 2021, 01:58 PM »
Some are suggesting I make the valance larger up to 2" but that'd throw the symmetry off which is why I'm asking if I can get away with 3/4" overhang to cover up some LEDs if I go that route.

You can make it whatever width you want to Matt...I needed 2" because at the time, LED strip lighting wasn't invented yet and I needed to shield the larger, deeper Halogen fixtures I installed.

Now with LED strip lighting, I'd make that same valence only 3/4" to 1" wide. With a narrow valence you'll also want to position the LED's very close to it.

I'd jury-rig a simple "cabinet bottom", place it at the height you think you want, mount a short piece of the strip lighting you plan on using and then fabricate a couple of valences in different widths and see what works. That'll get you 2 things, you may decide to raise or lower the bottom of the cabinet after some experimentation and you'll be able to decide how wide the valence needs to be to hide the LED's and prevent the stray light issue.

Make sure the chair is at the height you'll be using and if your wife is shorter than you, make sure she's part of the experiment.  [smile] You really don't want those LED's beaming any light in your direction because it's really distracting...gives you a headache.
That's the reason some people use the 45º LED brackets. Unfortunately that also throws the lighting away from the immediate area that you're trying to light up.



Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #109 on: March 20, 2021, 05:29 PM »
Matt, I think this is what Sparky was referring to.

On our kitchen cabinets I added a 2" valence to the BOTTOM of the cabinets to control light spread and keep it out of our eyes while working in the kitchen. The LED strip is approx 1" away from the front of the cabinets so that any chopping/cutting/mixing tasks are thoroughly illuminated. This is a photo showing the inside/back of the valence.

This is the front of the cabinets showing the front of the 2" wide valence that's flush with the front of the cabinets.

@Cheese, BINGO!   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #110 on: March 20, 2021, 05:34 PM »
Some are suggesting I make the valance larger up to 2" but that'd throw the symmetry off which is why I'm asking if I can get away with 3/4" overhang to cover up some LEDs if I go that route.


@DynaGlide, I'd suggest that you dummy it up using cardboard as a substitute for the valence to get a feel for the light spread, and use stick-on Velcro to test placement of the LED light strips until you dial it in for your needs.  In this scenario, you can vary both the valence height and light placement until you and she are both happy.
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #111 on: March 26, 2021, 12:24 PM »




I finalized the design and ordered materials. I am hoping to get going on this next week. My SketchUp Foo has greatly increased this past year and a half with this project. I will probably start learning Fusion360 next in anticipation of getting a CNC of some sort in 2022.

I took @neilc advice and am building two separate face frames to cover the left and right bank of cabinets. I accounted for having wider stiles where they meet the walls to allow me to scribe them in for a seamless look. To assist in my one man install I will cut the top nailers on each cabinet with a 45 bevel and place a mating french cleat piece on the wall which is about 2" less in width to allow for positioning. The wall cleats will only serve to help me get everything where I want before I attach to studs.

Thank you everyone for the contributions thus far.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #112 on: March 30, 2021, 02:39 PM »
I decided to take a mental health day and get into the shop. I quite liked the ripping station and cross cutting station setups. The one thing I'd change next time is to swap in my 90" TrackTubes to the crosscut station. There were a few pieces that were full length that needed squared on one end and that extra length of TrackTubes would've come in handy for material support. I don't own those roller support things that most guys use, they'd work just as well.

Cutting on those square dowels on the ripping station worked 'OK' but not great. I had to be very cautious about their placement. I'd opt for larger dowels next time. I accidentally cut into the lower sheet at the end of a cut one time but it is a part that won't be seen so I lucked out.





















Oh and just as I was about to hit Post, look what showed up:



I ordered it yesterday from a dealer in PA. Now that's fast. I'm a happy camper.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #113 on: March 30, 2021, 06:24 PM »
Ooohhh, Matt!!!  You're going to love the Kapex!!!   [big grin]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #114 on: April 01, 2021, 07:43 PM »
Here's some shots of how I use the vacuum pods in line with the vac sys pump head. I plumbed them to work together.









Yesterday and part of today were LR-32 time. Things didn't go as planned. I caught it on the 2nd panel when I went to do the back row of holes and they weren't lining up with the front, about 1mm off. After an impromptu troubleshooting session with @Sparktrician we figured out the OF1010 slipped on me off center. Only thing I can figure is I must've grabbed the LR-32 baseplate when tightening the router bit since all the holes are off by the same amount before I caught it.

When I went to do the rest I swapped in the 1400 since it screws securely to the baseplate.



For the out of alignment holes since they're for shelf pins I went searching for an 'adjustable' adjustable shelf pin. In my mind I figured a cam shaped shelf pin would be perfect, and voila, someone else had the same idea:



https://woodworker.com/spiral-support-shelf-pins-mssu-156-191.asp

I ordered up 100 of them to adjust out any slop when I go to install the shelves.

Finally, when I went to do the grooves for the back panels wouldn't you know it, the 6mm or 1/4" panels I ordered they shipped 7mm thick MDF. My router bit is 6.35mm so I can do it in one go with a little breathing room but because of the 7mm panels the distributor sent me that meant I had to do all the parts in two passes. All these little frustrations add up to lots of wasted time.

I really like my Vac Sys cart. It's the perfect station for LR-32, edgebanding, putting in grooves, Domino, sanding. Really speeds things up and makes the monotony of batching out cabinet parts less tedious. I don't have a big workshop but I'm glad I made room for the cart.

Matt
« Last Edit: April 01, 2021, 07:46 PM by DynaGlide »
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline jussi

  • Posts: 393
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #115 on: April 01, 2021, 07:49 PM »
Those vacuum pods looks pretty cool. Do you have a link to the seller?  How do you like them?

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #116 on: April 01, 2021, 07:52 PM »
Those vacuum pods looks pretty cool. Do you have a link to the seller?  How do you like them?

They're a very niche thing to have but for how I use them they're awesome. So much easier to twist two knobs to lock the rail down than deal with clamps from underneath. A member here from the UK has made a few pairs as his time allows and sells them on eBay. I hope he doesn't mind me sharing since I know he doesn't do it full time. @simonh is is forum name.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline jussi

  • Posts: 393
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #117 on: April 01, 2021, 08:35 PM »
Thanks.  I ended up finding his original post and expired ebay listing.  Looks very cool but $300 shipped is a bit too steep for me right now.  Hopefully he can find a US partner in the future. 

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5228
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #118 on: April 01, 2021, 08:51 PM »
Thanks.  I ended up finding his original post and expired ebay listing.  Looks very cool but $300 shipped is a bit too steep for me right now.  Hopefully he can find a US partner in the future.

Are like that aren’t hard for a woodworker to make.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #119 on: April 06, 2021, 11:39 AM »
Something I didn't run into with the base cabinets, how to hide the groove and bottom edge of the upper cabinets? I decided to put edgebanding over, seems to work okay. When these cabinets are up on the wall in my office, the bottoms will be seen.





I need to do some Domino work so I can test fit, measure for back panels, and check fit of the shelves.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #120 on: April 06, 2021, 05:27 PM »
Matt - nice progress.  Like the use of the vac holding clamps for the LR-32 rail.

So what are the grooves on the bottom of the adjustable shelves for?

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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #121 on: April 06, 2021, 06:50 PM »
Matt - nice progress.  Like the use of the vac holding clamps for the LR-32 rail.

So what are the grooves on the bottom of the adjustable shelves for?

Thanks Neil. Wish it was faster but I don't have much free time. Those are the cabinet tops and bottoms with the grooves.

Love that vac sys cart.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #122 on: April 07, 2021, 10:33 AM »
Vertical plunges in carcass sides are probably my least favorite thing to do. I'm not sure I'd even feel comfortable doing it without the @TSO_Products BigFoot accessory:









Now I can dry fit everything and pull measurements for the back panels and two doors and work on getting the adjustable shelves sized and apply front lips. Still debating on how I'll handle the face frame in terms of when I make it. It will mean longer project time but I'll probably get the cabinets painted and installed before final sizing so I can make sure it's perfect and scribe it before painting then install it.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #123 on: April 08, 2021, 11:53 AM »
This is what happens when one of your parts isn't square:







The side with the shelf pin holes has a taper in width from 387mm to 386mm. It was supposed to be 387mm. It threw the back panel groove off by a full 2mm and the shelf pin holes are out an extra mm front to back. Should I salvage this piece by making the groove wider toward the back of the side or scrap it? I'm out of material.

Matt

Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #124 on: April 08, 2021, 12:14 PM »
Widen the groove Matt.  [smile]

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 425
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #125 on: April 08, 2021, 12:16 PM »
This is what happens when one of your parts isn't square:

The side with the shelf pin holes has a taper in width from 387mm to 386mm. It was supposed to be 387mm. It threw the back panel groove off by a full 2mm and the shelf pin holes are out an extra mm front to back. Should I salvage this piece by making the groove wider toward the back of the side or scrap it? I'm out of material.

Matt

I'm not 100% sure which part isn't square because I think the lens distortion is affecting the perspective as well.

Are you saying the piece laying on its back is 387mm top-to-bottom in the back near the groove and only 386mm at the front?

Assuming you used one of the ends as a reference face for your pins, are they at least even if they're measured from either the top reference face or the bottom?

Is the top square, is the bottom square, or are neither?

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #126 on: April 08, 2021, 12:24 PM »



I'm not 100% sure which part isn't square because I think the lens distortion is affecting the perspective as well.

Are you saying the piece laying on its back is 387mm top-to-bottom in the back near the groove and only 386mm at the front?

Assuming you used one of the ends as a reference face for your pins, are they at least even if they're measured from either the top reference face or the bottom?

Is the top square, is the bottom square, or are neither?

The side laying down with the shelf pin holes measures 387mm toward the bottom and 386mm toward the top. The top and bottom panels are square and measure 387mm.

If I widen the groove like @Cheese suggests then I think I'll be okay. The alignment of the shelf pin holes will be a little off and the back side of the cabinet would be a little off but you'd never see it anyway.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 425
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #127 on: April 08, 2021, 12:35 PM »
Ahh, that makes much more sense.  I was misjudging which edges were out-of-spec, even after my metric-to-imperial conversion.

Offline Dr. P. Venkman

  • Posts: 101
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #128 on: April 08, 2021, 12:51 PM »
I am not at all understanding how a 1mm variance in thickness* caused it to be out by that much. Is the front corner of that joint flush, or is the side with the shelf pin holes proud of the top panel?

Edit: width, not thickness.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2021, 12:54 PM by Dr. P. Venkman »

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #129 on: April 08, 2021, 02:13 PM »
@Cheese Groove widened.

It looks worse from the side than head on





I'll be sure to install this one to the far left of the wall so the gap won't be seen. Woodworking isn't about making things perfect but how to cover up your stupid mistakes so others don't see them.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline cpw

  • Posts: 298
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #130 on: April 08, 2021, 02:17 PM »
Vertical plunges in carcass sides are probably my least favorite thing to do. I'm not sure I'd even feel comfortable doing it without the @TSO_Products BigFoot accessory:
An alternative is using the Domiplate from Seneca.  The Domiplate goes on the edge to register your offset, and the domino fence then supports the machine on the face.  There are a lot of accessories to get good results with the DF500, it's nice to have all these choices.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #131 on: April 08, 2021, 02:20 PM »
Ya, once you put the shelves in there and do the filing paper shuffle  [smile]  you'll never notice it. You'd literally have to unload it to find it.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #132 on: April 08, 2021, 02:20 PM »
Vertical plunges in carcass sides are probably my least favorite thing to do. I'm not sure I'd even feel comfortable doing it without the @TSO_Products BigFoot accessory:
An alternative is using the Domiplate from Seneca.  The Domiplate goes on the edge to register your offset, and the domino fence then supports the machine on the face.  There are a lot of accessories to get good results with the DF500, it's nice to have all these choices.

@cpw I bought a domiplate when I got my Domino but I don't use it because I realized pretty quick I don't like centering my mortises. It's also kind of awkward to work the Domino upside down.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #133 on: April 08, 2021, 02:56 PM »
I bought a domiplate when I got my Domino but I don't use it because I realized pretty quick I don't like centering my mortises. It's also kind of awkward to work the Domino upside down.

I concur Matt...one of the first items I purchased for the DF 500 was a Domiplate but after using it, I quickly abandoned it. I keep it with the DF 500 "just in case", well, 9 years later "just in case" still hasn't happened.  [big grin]

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5228
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #134 on: April 08, 2021, 04:56 PM »
If you widen the groove in the top piece you can close the gap.
Rip a filler to stuff behind the back panel in the then too wide groove.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #135 on: April 29, 2021, 01:23 PM »
I finally got back to this. I think I talk myself out of making doors sometimes because they slow me down. When you only make them once a year it's a learning curve each time. I re-arranged the shop a bit the past month. Really liking the flow. I have infeed/outfeed for the miter saw at all times and can setup the CMS with outfeed as well.

The doors are the same style as the bottom cabinets. Tongue and groove with a 1/2" MDF center panel that will be back cut to fit the groove and end up about flush to the back of the door.





Once I get the doors done and test fit I'll move onto lipping the shelves and prepping for paint.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline cpw

  • Posts: 298
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #136 on: April 29, 2021, 04:00 PM »
That photo could be an advertisement for the system having all the outfeeds at the same height.  That every tool serves as work support for another really makes efficient use of that space.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #137 on: May 03, 2021, 01:30 PM »
That photo could be an advertisement for the system having all the outfeeds at the same height.  That every tool serves as work support for another really makes efficient use of that space.

The system is the only reason I can do what I do in that space. I'd love to have a giant workshop like some people.







Moment of truth:



At first I could not get an even reveal. It was way off. Then I remembered duh the cabinet isn't squared up yet. I threw some Jevons clamping squares on the back and everything lined up nicely.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #138 on: May 03, 2021, 06:44 PM »
Nice job on the doors, Matt!   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #139 on: May 04, 2021, 09:44 AM »
Nice job on the doors, Matt!   [smile]

Thanks Willy 👍

On to lipping the shelves, then prep for paint.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 526
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #140 on: May 04, 2021, 10:04 AM »
Hey Matt, curious to how the DC was using the 1010 and the 35mm bit for the cup hinge holes?  My first attempt was a bit messy so I went back to the Kreg jig.  But hope to try my 1400 next, using the dust shroud with the window slider removed.  Thanks to the suggestion from Erik on Poplar Shop.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #141 on: May 04, 2021, 10:23 AM »
Hey Matt, curious to how the DC was using the 1010 and the 35mm bit for the cup hinge holes?  My first attempt was a bit messy so I went back to the Kreg jig.  But hope to try my 1400 next, using the dust shroud with the window slider removed.  Thanks to the suggestion from Erik on Poplar Shop.

Hi Rick,

Honestly it's not great/almost non existent. Although I don't remember the 1400 being much better even with the window slider removed. My 1400 was in the CMS and I didn't feel like getting it out for 4 cup hinges.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #142 on: May 04, 2021, 01:25 PM »
Time to transform my shop again:



I get my maple S4S in 8-10' lengths from my supplier. I ordered 2.5" knowing I'd have to rip it down to the dimension I wanted for the shelf lips and face frame. To make the material manageable I cut about two lengths of shelf worth off one of the 8-10' boards then ran the two pieces through the table saw:





The shortened 36mm hose did a surprisingly good job of capturing dust all things considered:



Most of it just shot back onto me then to the floor.

A little clean up and putting things back to normal:



This is what the shelves will look like more or less from the front:



Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #143 on: May 05, 2021, 06:48 AM »
I received a block plane as a gift almost a year ago and haven't used it because I have no background in hand tools or sharpening. Yesterday I got off my butt and tried out the scary sharp system shown in this video:



It all turned out surprisingly easy and I wish I would've just done it sooner.









I have a feeling I'll be reaching for the block plane a lot more around the shop.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #144 on: May 07, 2021, 09:55 AM »
To apply the lipping to the shelves I decided to use 5x30 dominos on the loose setting. 15mm plunge into each the shelf and the 3/4 edging and I didn't have to mess with settings on the domino. Made it pretty straightforward. The two materials aren't perfectly flush where there aren't dominos but they're really close.











Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #145 on: May 07, 2021, 12:50 PM »
To apply the lipping to the shelves I decided to use 5x30 dominos on the loose setting. 15mm plunge into each the shelf and the 3/4 edging and I didn't have to mess with settings on the domino. Made it pretty straightforward. The two materials aren't perfectly flush where there aren't dominos but they're really close.

Matt


Good job, Matt!  A Rotex will reduce any variations and make things flush.  Are you going to kiss the edges with a 1/16" (1.5 mm) round-over bit?   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #146 on: May 07, 2021, 02:35 PM »
To apply the lipping to the shelves I decided to use 5x30 dominos on the loose setting. 15mm plunge into each the shelf and the 3/4 edging and I didn't have to mess with settings on the domino. Made it pretty straightforward. The two materials aren't perfectly flush where there aren't dominos but they're really close.

Matt


Good job, Matt!  A Rotex will reduce any variations and make things flush.  Are you going to kiss the edges with a 1/16" (1.5 mm) round-over bit?   [smile]

Thanks Willy! Yes I plan on giving them the roundover treatment. I'm tempted to do a chamfer instead since the face frames will likely receive one so I can carry it through to the inside corners with a chisel. Thoughts?
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #147 on: May 07, 2021, 02:49 PM »
To apply the lipping to the shelves I decided to use 5x30 dominos on the loose setting. 15mm plunge into each the shelf and the 3/4 edging and I didn't have to mess with settings on the domino. Made it pretty straightforward. The two materials aren't perfectly flush where there aren't dominos but they're really close.

Matt


Good job, Matt!  A Rotex will reduce any variations and make things flush.  Are you going to kiss the edges with a 1/16" (1.5 mm) round-over bit?   [smile]

Thanks Willy! Yes I plan on giving them the roundover treatment. I'm tempted to do a chamfer instead since the face frames will likely receive one so I can carry it through to the inside corners with a chisel. Thoughts?

I think you might want to do a mock-up of each to see which one looks better.  Long-term, I suspect that the round-over might work better in that constantly shifting contents in and out might have less adverse wear effect on the rounded over surfaces than on the crispness of the alternative chamfered edges.  Your decision (or hers), in any case.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Rick Herrick

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #148 on: May 07, 2021, 04:01 PM »
FWIW, I tried a small, 1/8" chamfer on some oak for cabinets and by the time I had sanding done, it was almost a round-over anyway.  Probably my technique but maybe keep that in mind.

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #149 on: May 07, 2021, 05:14 PM »
A few swipes with a block plane and you’ll have a nice crisp chamfer.

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #150 on: May 11, 2021, 10:51 AM »
I decided to have some fun with the 1010 with a guide bushing, MFK 700 with a 1/16" roundover bit, and my track saw to add a place for wires to go to the shelves. The track saw was the last step since I left the shelves too deep on purpose. I really like how these shelves are turning out.













Instagram @matts.garage

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Offline Cheese

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #151 on: May 11, 2021, 01:32 PM »
I'm liking the shelves with the thick fronts Matt...a real nice place to hide a LED strip behind. And with the nice relief you routed into the rear of the shelf for wiring I'd just rout another pathway on the underside to the front of the shelf for LED wires.

I know you originally wanted an adjustable LED system in case you moved the shelves, but if you think about, once the shelves are set, they rarely ever get moved. I don't think our kitchen shelves or the bookcase shelves in the office have been moved in 15-20 years. Besides, if you do move them it'll probably be just a couple of holes up or a couple of holes down, nothing that can't be compensated with some extra wire length that could be incorporated into a neat "roll up/wind up" system on the bottom of each shelf.

Just an idea... [smile]

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #152 on: May 11, 2021, 02:34 PM »
 [poke] [poke] @Cheese I'm listening. You have a point. A white wire going up the center of each cabinet wouldn't really be noticed if it was run neatly or covered. Plus with that setup I like that everything is accessible. I just couldn't get behind the idea of hiding wiring in areas I wouldn't be able to reach them if they failed for whatever reason.

I know next to nothing about LED lighting. I'm guessing I'd put a transformer/control unit in the center cabinet with doors, then run wires to each shelf, where self adhesive LED strips would be placed near the front behind the overhang of the maple lip?
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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8589
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #153 on: May 12, 2021, 09:50 AM »
[poke] [poke] @Cheese I'm listening. You have a point.
1. A white wire going up the center of each cabinet wouldn't really be noticed if it was run neatly or covered.

2. Plus with that setup I like that everything is accessible. I just couldn't get behind the idea of hiding wiring in areas I wouldn't be able to reach them if they failed for whatever reason.

3. I'm guessing I'd put a transformer/control unit in the center cabinet with doors, then run wires to each shelf, where self adhesive LED strips would be placed near the front behind the overhang of the maple lip?

This may get a bit lengthy Matt but stay with me.  [smile]

1. You'll be able to easily hide a pair of 16 or 18 gauge wires in the rear of the cabinet. You may even be able to run 20 gauge if the run isn't too long. 

2. You absolutely want to be able to easily access each component in the system. LED's don't last forever, usually in the 30,000 to 50,000 hour range, so it's something to think about if you decide to use these as "night lights".

3. For a transformer, in LED speak they're called drivers. I prefer Meanwell drivers because they're reliable, compact and inexpensive. I purchase my electronic stuff from Mouser because they have fast delivery and there is no minimum quantity. This is the LP series drivers however the AP series will also work. You're just looking for a constant voltage driver in the appropriate wattage & voltage. For a small system 12 volts will be fine. Here is a 60 watt/12 volt and a 20 watt/12 volt for the kitchen & bath respectively.

https://www.mouser.com/new/meanwell/meanwell-lp-power-supplies/




Now for the rest... [smile]...I'd absolutely use an aluminum profile screwed to the bottom of the shelf, that's the easiest method for assembly and servicing. Besides, the aluminum profile acts as a heat sink and will remove a lot of the heat from the LED tape strip and heat absolutely KILLS LED's and it also protects the LED's from damage with books/binders.  Besides, the profile will also accept a clear/frosted plastic lens. Here's a typical aluminum extrusion, LED tape, light cover and end cover.




I prefer placing a small connector near the LED, again easier for assembly & servicing. If something happens, you unplug the connector and remove the shelf. The connector also gives you an easy way to check for voltage and there are no wires to remove and re-run. I'm a fan of small Molex connectors.




Absolutely solder the wires to the LED tape. Do not use those quick attachment clips that they advertise. This is what can happen...this is pretty common.  [sad]  And this connector was purchased from one of the best in the business...Diode LED.






Place the LED driver in an area where you can also install a barrier terminal strip. So, 120 volts go in to the driver and 12 volts come out to the various LED runs. Here I also placed a Molex connector on the 14 gauge wires that go to the driver, while the individual runs are 18 gauge. In 99.99% of the time an LED will go bad or a driver will go bad but the wiring will be fine so it all stays in place. It's a lot easier to troubleshoot and repair with small connectors attached because the item can be brought to the bench.



More questions...feel free, you know where I live.  [big grin]
« Last Edit: May 12, 2021, 11:09 AM by Cheese »

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #154 on: May 12, 2021, 01:29 PM »
That is some sage advice @Cheese thank you for the pictures.

Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #155 on: May 12, 2021, 01:48 PM »
@Cheese , what kind of connectors are those that burned (in the fourth image)?  I've been using Molex connectors since the Dark Ages, and have never seen one get burned like that. 
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #156 on: May 12, 2021, 03:03 PM »
@Cheese , what kind of connectors are those that burned (in the fourth image)?  I've been using Molex connectors since the Dark Ages, and have never seen one get burned like that.

I believe those are the LED light strip connectors that friction fit over the end for the two wires to attach. I wonder if that's a fluke or something common as I know a guy on IG who fits those lights on a regular basis using the supplied friction connectors.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Cheese

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #157 on: May 12, 2021, 04:08 PM »
@Cheese , what kind of connectors are those that burned (in the fourth image)?  I've been using Molex connectors since the Dark Ages, and have never seen one get burned like that.

Hey Sparky, that's the Diode LED connection that I purchased for $6 each that I thought would mitigate the risk of push-on connections. That's what happened within 10 months of use with under-counter lighting in the kitchen.

I'd always read that there were issues with these type connectors but I figured if I was using Diode LED strips, then I would be safe by using their connector...not so much.

I've since just soldered any LED connection and that's worked really well. Easier to solder when the light strip hasn't yet been installed [smile] and it only takes 5-10 seconds once the iron is hot.


Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #158 on: May 29, 2021, 09:03 AM »
I bought some grommets to help with the wiring on the cabinets. I felt it would be easier/cleaner to rout out for them before paint using a circle template from Rockler:





They're a nice snug fit. Everything was going great until I oriented the jig the wrong way on the third panel and put the hole in the wrong spot.

After sleeping on it I was able to use the same jig and a different bushing and cutter to make a plug:









The fix should work out once I paint everything.

Matt

Instagram @matts.garage

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #159 on: May 29, 2021, 11:01 AM »
Matt and all you other contributors:
- what an informative and helpful thread for anyone considering one or more elements of this project - including handling of surprises.

Taking the time to illustrate the project adds that much more to the usefulness of all the helpful information!

Matt, you serve the FOG's "Just do it" Award - seriously.

Hans
PS: been just a tad busy at TSO this past year or so . . .

Offline dicktill

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Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #160 on: May 29, 2021, 12:15 PM »
Nicely documented, Matt!  One suggestion, though - when you're joining two rails with the Betterley, I'd suggest that you use the
Guide Rail Index LA-LR 32 FS, Item number 496938 to space the holey rails properly to get a consistent 32mm pattern at the join point.  Feel free to ping me if this doesn't make sense.   [smile]

@Sparktrician: Is this 496938 accessory different than the two blocks that come with the LR-32 kit?

Thanks, Dick

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #161 on: May 29, 2021, 12:19 PM »
Matt and all you other contributors:
- what an informative and helpful thread for anyone considering one or more elements of this project - including handling of surprises.

Taking the time to illustrate the project adds that much more to the usefulness of all the helpful information!

Matt, you serve the FOG's "Just do it" Award - seriously.

Hans
PS: been just a tad busy at TSO this past year or so . . .

Those are very kind words Hans. I'm just kind of making this up as I go. I envy those who had some form of formal training or apprenticeship.

I picked up 2 gallons Kem Aqua Plus this morning. I'll be off to painting before long.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #162 on: May 29, 2021, 01:02 PM »
Nicely documented, Matt!  One suggestion, though - when you're joining two rails with the Betterley, I'd suggest that you use the
Guide Rail Index LA-LR 32 FS, Item number 496938 to space the holey rails properly to get a consistent 32mm pattern at the join point.  Feel free to ping me if this doesn't make sense.   [smile]

@Sparktrician: Is this 496938 accessory different than the two blocks that come with the LR-32 kit?

Thanks, Dick

@dicktill, it's the very same piece.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #163 on: May 29, 2021, 04:52 PM »


This came in today. Playing around with it, it has a little wobble but should do nicely. I could really use two but I'm not convinced I would need the second on a regular basis.





For the amount of space it occupies and cost vs making something I couldn't do any better if I tried. 4 wing nuts and it stores pretty much flat.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Tom in SoCal

  • Posts: 124
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #164 on: May 30, 2021, 01:14 AM »
Matt and all you other contributors:
- what an informative and helpful thread for anyone considering one or more elements of this project - including handling of surprises.

Taking the time to illustrate the project adds that much more to the usefulness of all the helpful information!

Matt, you serve the FOG's "Just do it" Award - seriously.

Hans
PS: been just a tad busy at TSO this past year or so . . .

Ditto!  Thanks to all for sharing!

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 526
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #165 on: May 30, 2021, 08:33 AM »
This came in today. Playing around with it, it has a little wobble but should do nicely. I could really use two but I'm not convinced I would need the second on a regular basis.

For the amount of space it occupies and cost vs making something I couldn't do any better if I tried. 4 wing nuts and it stores pretty much flat.

Matt
I am impressed, that looks like a good deal of weight for it to carry.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 498
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #166 on: May 31, 2021, 12:34 PM »
Cheese, that's great advice that I wish I had known about some time ago.
The first job I did in the temporary shop (after the fire) was to re-make a reception desk that had several rows of lights going along horizontal panels inside the wall itself. It was quite a pain in the first place. I had sections that would flicker or look like a different color temp and the connections were in hard to reach places (corners) and I wrestled with it way too long before submitting and going out to get a soldering iron. Then the next day, the fire killed it, so I had to do it over.
I did talk the supply buyer into getting some different lights and drivers, but is was still a difficult thing to thread through and wire up. At all times my concern was serviceability later. I just knew it would be an issue "someday". I didn't know how soon though. It was only a few months and one of the installers had to go back and deal with it. Fortunately it was just replacing one of the drivers, easily reached behind an access panel.
 Those sliding connectors suck. In the future, I would solder everything that needed this type of extension from the beginning.
The last little bar back wall that I did just had the round puck style lights that plugged in directly, it went well.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #167 on: June 10, 2021, 07:47 AM »
I made some time yesterday to start on painting. I basically have to take off work if I want to do this which drags projects out for months.











I got my steps in and was exhausted by the end. Spray in the garage, dry in the house, sand in the basement. Two coats of primer, sanded in between and after with 25 parts. I must've ran up and down the stairs over 100 times. I'm always pretty rusty when I start spraying and make mistakes but I don't worry too much about them at that stage with the primer as it gets sanded. By the time I get to the finish coats I remember how to use the Fuji setup.

Between dropping off and picking up kids and cleanup I didn't have much time. I'll have to save the top coats for another day.

That Vac Sys cart I built has earned its keep many times over. It gets extensive use on every operation.

Next project I tackle will not involve paint.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3031
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #168 on: June 10, 2021, 09:50 PM »
Great job!  What paint are you using?  And curious if you'll assemble with glue and screws and then respray on a final coat?

Glad to see the VacSys cart getting continued use.

Thanks for the updates!


Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #169 on: June 11, 2021, 07:43 AM »
Great job!  What paint are you using?  And curious if you'll assemble with glue and screws and then respray on a final coat?

Glad to see the VacSys cart getting continued use.

Thanks for the updates!

Hey @neilc just screws and Dominos on this one. I'm hoping to avoid any spraying after assembly.

Edit: I'm using Kem Aqua+ Surfacer and top coat
« Last Edit: June 11, 2021, 07:56 AM by DynaGlide »
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Offline mike_aa

  • Posts: 1225
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #170 on: June 11, 2021, 11:16 AM »
@DynaGlide  That is really looking great.  Are you gluing the Dominos?  This may be a dumb question, but doesn't the overspray in the Domino mortices cause issues with gluing and fit?

Thanks, Mike A.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #171 on: June 11, 2021, 11:30 AM »
@DynaGlide  That is really looking great.  Are you gluing the Dominos?  This may be a dumb question, but doesn't the overspray in the Domino mortices cause issues with gluing and fit?

Thanks, Mike A.

Hopefully I can cram them in there but no I'm not using any glue. The Dominos are just there for alignment and a little bit for strength. The screws will be doing the work. Once the boxes are up on the wall and screwed together and to studs they aren't going anywhere.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #172 on: June 11, 2021, 11:39 AM »
When we bought the house there was an old cabinet in the basement with a laminate top. I trashed the cabinet but kept the top. I use it for all sorts of things like protecting the MFT from water when I'm cleaning my spray gun, or when I'm sharpening. This time around the 7mm MDF backs warped on me after spraying and I was able to flatten them back out overnight.



« Last Edit: June 11, 2021, 01:31 PM by DynaGlide »
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Offline Dr. P. Venkman

  • Posts: 101
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #173 on: June 11, 2021, 02:04 PM »
It really is looking terrific.

How do you like the Kem Aqua Plus with that Fuji HVLP?

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1054
Re: Home Office Remodel
« Reply #174 on: June 11, 2021, 02:10 PM »
It really is looking terrific.

How do you like the Kem Aqua Plus with that Fuji HVLP?

Thank you. I like it well enough. I'm new to spraying compared to most. Its main selling point is I can spray it without thinning the primer. I loathe thinning it messes with the chemistry and it makes refilling the gun more time consuming. I've had my base cabinets with KA+ for a year now and they're holding up well. With any product you have to be willing to adapt unless you're in a climate controlled setting. It's something you get a feel for.

I do add 10% General Finishes Extender to the top coat as I've heard it helps it go down smooth.

Instagram @matts.garage