Author Topic: hinge removal/dutchman  (Read 1202 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MTbassbone

  • Posts: 58
hinge removal/dutchman
« on: May 29, 2022, 12:27 AM »
Hi all, I removed some louvered doors from doorways going to and from our kitchen, and am now left with the hinge mortises on the door jambs.  The door hinges were smaller, and I am concerned if I try to make a dutchman this size it will not look good or maybe not even hold.  I am wondering if it would be better to make the mortise larger either by hand (chisel) or with a router/homemade jig.  Anyone have experience with this type of situation? 

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline hoedma

  • Posts: 20
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2022, 05:41 AM »
Hi,

Not sure how to help you but I must say, as Dutchman I do not know what a dutchman is  [big grin]. COuld you enlighten me?

kind regards,
Mattijs
(TS55, Midi, RTS400, LR32, OF1010, CS50, RO150, T18, CMS OF, BS75)

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 12536
  • XENA - #4 Coming 8/20/22
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2022, 05:58 AM »
@hoedma , here is a link that you might find interesting:  Dutchman

Peter

Offline cpw

  • Posts: 360
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2022, 07:45 AM »
Hi all, I removed some louvered doors from doorways going to and from our kitchen, and am now left with the hinge mortises on the door jambs.  The door hinges were smaller, and I am concerned if I try to make a dutchman this size it will not look good or maybe not even hold.  I am wondering if it would be better to make the mortise larger either by hand (chisel) or with a router/homemade jig.  Anyone have experience with this type of situation?
Painted or stained?

Either way, the patch should have glue area that is the entire back side surface; and is think and the door jamb shouldn't be stressed.

With paint, you should definitely be able to make it just blend in.  Though it may be easier to cover and sand it with Bondo or another wood filler rather than having to have something fit exactly.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 1649
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2022, 09:55 AM »
Hi,

Not sure how to help you but I must say, as Dutchman I do not know what a dutchman is  [big grin]. COuld you enlighten me?

kind regards,
Mattijs

It's realistically just an old fashioned term for a patch. The damaged area would be cut out and replaced with something matching. They are not generally structural or ornamental like a bow-tie would be, but the process would be similar. It's just a way to fix a larger piece without having to replace it entirely, blended in and hopefully not visible.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation
MFT clamps set

Offline Peter Kelly

  • Posts: 131
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2022, 10:21 AM »
Hi,

Not sure how to help you but I must say, as Dutchman I do not know what a dutchman is  [big grin]. COuld you enlighten me?

kind regards,
Mattijs
The term likely originated in the era of tall ships where rectangular wooden patches in a boat hulls resembled the way in which Dutch sailors were known to mend their trousers.

Offline MTbassbone

  • Posts: 58
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2022, 10:24 AM »
Thanks for the responses.  Yes, it will be painted.  What product should I use to fill the seams?  Plastic Wood?  I don't want the seams to crack and show through the paint.  I was thinking of routing out a larger area so I would get sufficient glue area and also so it is flat.  There are 8 of these hinges to fill.

Offline mino

  • Posts: 1022
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2022, 10:55 AM »
IMO this calls for routing and putting in a bigger piece.

The biggest issue is the thickness of the paint - you will need to, at least partially, compensate by "oversanding" and putting a couple thick layers of paint to at least approximate the thickness of the original paint "crust".

If this was at my place, I would do an initial patch-up, sanding over to the wood - not to the paint level - and a wider patch. Then paint it over a couple times with thick paint, over several months. Finishing with a new paint over the whole frame in 1/2 year or so.

That is, if I wanted the frame to look "as if it was whole from the get go". Depends on what you are shooting for.

Visually, the biggest challenge will be to avoid an obvious area where the paint is visibly thinner which will then be seen-through as "too perfect" on the otherwise curvy/liquid frame surface.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2022, 10:57 AM by mino »
When The Machine has no brains, use yours.

Offline cpw

  • Posts: 360
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2022, 12:06 PM »
I definitely would want to get rid of that caked up paint from behind the hinge so that you just have the gap to fill, and can fill it to wood.

I find that Bondo filler is easier to work with than plastic wood.  It is creamier before it sets, so can get  a nice smooth surface; and then hardens very quickly so you can sand it.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/3M-Bondo-12-fl-oz-Wood-Filler-30081/206680651

If you route out a more uniform area and create patches, you'll still need to fill the edges.

If it were my house, I would probably start with Bondo and see if you can get acceptable results.  You can always route out a larger section including the Bondo afterwards if you are not satisfied.

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 12536
  • XENA - #4 Coming 8/20/22
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2022, 07:23 PM »
After seeing the picture, I would get rid of the paint in the mortise, take a chisel and bevel the edges of the mortise and also the crack below, and then fill with body filler or wood filler.  Sand and paint.  Making a dutchman might be a worthy experiment, but with painted wood in this situation you are more concerned with blending it in.

Peter

Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 141
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2022, 08:30 PM »
+1 for beveling the edges before filling. 
Will reduce telegraphing of the seam.  Might be good spot to use some sandable primer before painting.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2806
Re: hinge removal/dutchman
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2022, 07:39 PM »
I had an opposite situation.  My daughter bought a three bedroom house that only had doors on the bathroom 🧐🧐.  I bought six panel doors, stained to match the original shellac (first job was as stainer in custom cabinet factory).  When I routed the jambs I routed out patches from when the house was built in 39.