Author Topic: Doing better at installing wall cabinets  (Read 3773 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 413
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #30 on: March 23, 2021, 03:41 PM »
Fastcap makes cabinet jacks.  The tall ones sell at $82.00 a pair; the short ones at $32.00 per pair.  The short ones require that there be lower cabinets for them to rest on.  The tall ones will not work if the lower cabinets are already installed.

The first video shows how it works.  The 2nd video is more detailed.





In the USA Woodworkers Express is a competitive and reliable supplier (at least from my experience).

https://www.woodworkerexpress.com/search.php?mode=search&page=1

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 2124
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #31 on: March 23, 2021, 08:48 PM »
Another idea for locking French cleats.

-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline JeremyH.

  • Posts: 315
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #32 on: March 23, 2021, 11:13 PM »
Cabinet jacks are trash. You want T-jacks.
CXS;RO150;ETS EC 125/3 EQ;CT26e  KSS400;MT55cc;DDF 40

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 413
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #33 on: March 24, 2021, 08:33 AM »
I was not familiar with the T-Jacks.  Thanks for that.

https://www.rockler.com/t-jacks-brains-over-brawn-in-cabinet-installation

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 413
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #34 on: March 24, 2021, 08:36 AM »
Another idea for locking French cleats.



I could not be 100% sure, but it looked like he made the cleats from plywood.  Conceptually, I am not a fan of using plywood for French cleats.  The strips are fairly narrow and plywood in narrow strips can delaminate much easier than large pieces.  Also the stresses on the cleat can easily be in the direction that would cause a strip to delaminate. 

Other than that, I thought it was very clever.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8581
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #35 on: March 24, 2021, 09:34 AM »
I could not be 100% sure, but it looked like he made the cleats from plywood.  Conceptually, I am not a fan of using plywood for French cleats.  The strips are fairly narrow and plywood in narrow strips can delaminate much easier than large pieces.  Also the stresses on the cleat can easily be in the direction that would cause a strip to delaminate. 

Other than that, I thought it was very clever.

Thanks for the video...it is a clever idea for those items that you may be moving.  I also wouldn't recommend plywood but for the little items & doo-dads that he's hanging I'm sure he'll be fine.

Offline JeremyH.

  • Posts: 315
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #36 on: March 24, 2021, 12:42 PM »
I was not familiar with the T-Jacks.  Thanks for that.

https://www.rockler.com/t-jacks-brains-over-brawn-in-cabinet-installation

The precision makes all the difference. Plus you can pull them up to position much faster.
CXS;RO150;ETS EC 125/3 EQ;CT26e  KSS400;MT55cc;DDF 40

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 413
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #37 on: March 24, 2021, 12:51 PM »
These guys made their own cabinet jacks using pipe clamps.  Looks clever.


Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #38 on: March 24, 2021, 02:25 PM »
I could not be 100% sure, but it looked like he made the cleats from plywood.  Conceptually, I am not a fan of using plywood for French cleats.  The strips are fairly narrow and plywood in narrow strips can delaminate much easier than large pieces.  Also the stresses on the cleat can easily be in the direction that would cause a strip to delaminate. 

Other than that, I thought it was very clever.

Thanks for the video...it is a clever idea for those items that you may be moving.  I also wouldn't recommend plywood but for the little items & doo-dads that he's hanging I'm sure he'll be fine.

I'm not fond of using plywood for cleats either.  I prefer solid maple, properly dried, planed and jointed (if necessary).  It seems to me that maple has superior resistance to warping, cracking and bowing.  I've also used Douglas fir, for the same reasons. 
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 413
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #39 on: March 24, 2021, 02:56 PM »
I use poplar for carpentry trim work.  Pine is ok, but it seems to split a bit more often. 

But for spraying a nice finish, I much prefer maple.  It is slower to cut and slower to sand, but it is harder and seems to accept a smoother coat of paint.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8581
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #40 on: March 24, 2021, 03:03 PM »
I'm not fond of using plywood for cleats either.  I prefer solid maple, properly dried, planed and jointed (if necessary).  It seems to me that maple has superior resistance to warping, cracking and bowing.  I've also used Douglas fir, for the same reasons.

I'd love to use Doug Fir  [smile]  but around here it's more expensive than walnut.  [eek] 

And Sitka spruce is more expensive yet.

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1451
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #41 on: March 24, 2021, 04:18 PM »
@Cheese  If you can get by with resawing dimensional lumber look around for older buildings being torn down. Our little bungalow down here in southern Illinois was built in 1911-1912. Most of the wood in the house from studs to joists and 1x4 tongue and groove is old growth Douglas fir. the grain is simply amazing once you uncover it.

Ron

Offline Packard

  • Posts: 413
Re: Doing better at installing wall cabinets
« Reply #42 on: March 24, 2021, 04:53 PM »
My house has 3" x 8" douglas fir joists in the basement.  From 1953 build.  The wood is so hard that it easily snaps off drywall screws.  And driving nails into it is really tough.  The code only calls for 2" x 8".  I guess they didn't want the floors to squeak.

It gave me a new respect for Douglas Fir. 

The deck was 47 years old when I replaced it.  All Douglas Fir.  I don't think my pressure-treated lumber will last that long.