Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 122956 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1032
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
When I searched for some videos regarding the use and setup/carving of that DIY Duplex Sanding Pad from Festool ( https://www.festool.com/accessory/490780---ssh-stf-ls130-kit ) that Michael found, I stumbled over this:





Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1270
Quote
@HarveyWildes This is what you’re inventing.
« Last Edit: Today at 04:42 PM by Michael Kellough »

Yes, that is what I was thinking of. Maybe I saw that some time ago
and forgot, but it's right in line with what I pictured, and the price
seems reasonable when you factor in all the sanding it could save.

-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6385
This is what you’re inventing.[/url]

Unfortunately, that's only a viable solution for large radiused profiles. From my experience there are 2 or 3 inherent problems involved when using this option on small/tight profiles.

1. The thickness of the sandpaper
2. The stiffness of the sandpaper substrate
3. The size of the sandpaper granules

All 3 of these issues add up to be a very ineffectual solution to power sanding small dimensioned/featured wooden profiles.

I'm thinking something more along the lines of the old 3M WetorDry sand paper or the 3M Tri-M-ite sand paper. It was composed of a very thin backing paper that was also very flexible and very tough. That, combined with the small diameter sanding granules allowed the stuff to get into the nooks & crannies that were incredibly small. The small granule size may not be great for removing existing finishes, but that's better left to stripping compounds.

The small granules would then be effective in abrading the surface and providing a tooth for the new finish to adhere to.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2019, 09:06 AM by Cheese »

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3717
when I was waaayyyy back in high school shop class, we used a wet/drysand paper that was very thin and very flexible to get into all sorts of tight and intricate places. We could fold it back against a very sharp corner of a sanding pad that we had cut to fit into a very tight corner. The sand paper would not tear with such a tight bend. I don't remember if the backing material was paper or cloth. I just remember using the paper/cloth to get into very tight corners.

Later, during my learning period in the real world, I was often shunted off with the painting crew (I actually hated painting and especially the sanding in preparation for the painting) and the painters would sand some very intricate moldings where they would get into very tight corners with a very stiff paper with fine grit. That was way back even before I was 38, so I don't remember all the details. As I progressed and eventually got into my trade, if the part did not fit, we used a bigger hammer. We weren't using paint, but paster hid many deficiencies. We used trowels and other finishing tools. I liked that much better.

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1032
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
@Cheese

 [big grin]  [eek]  [big grin]  [smile]







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6385
@Cheese

 [big grin]  [eek]  [big grin]  [smile]







Kind regards,
Oliver

That's funny Oliver...but that's exactly the stuff I'm talking about. Maybe the new Festool net would be flexible enough to work for this application?  I don't have any so I have no experience with it.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1032
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
That's what happens when you turn 3 different generation workshops into one, more or less. I knew exactly what you were talking about and in which drawer I would find it. :)

I think the net stuff would be flexible enough.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6385

Don't hunt for the S473 if you can get your hands on the Festool Granat sponges, I went looking for my after Uli mentioned them, and they are probably exactly the same ... except for the abrasive itself? I would love to know if Festools sponges are made in the UK, if they are - the Bosch are as well. I wouldn't be surprised if there is only one real manufacturer for these sponges and the only difference is the quality of abrasive and bonding.


Thanks for that observation Oliver as I was going to order a few S473 packages from Amazon UK. So, I went back and looked at the Festool sanding sponges, 201112 (60 grit), 201113 (120 grit), 201114 (220 grit) & 201507 (800 grit). They appear to be the very same as the Bosch S473 offerings. Same pad size & same pad thickness.  [cool]

The Bosch S473 pads I've seen are orange, yellow & green. However, I noticed you were using a Bosch blue pad, would that be the equivalent of the Festool 201507 800 grit or more like the 201114 220 grit pad?


Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1032
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Sadly, Bosch doesn't offer any information on the actual grit. Or at least I can't find that information.

What I can say, is:

Green = super fine
Yellow = fine
Orange = medium

Those are the Bosch Professional S473 Best for Contour

And my guess is, they more or less equal the Festool 800, 220 and (probably) 120 grit.

The blue Bosch pad, although sold to me along with the yellow and other Professional sponge products from Bosch, seems to be from Bosch's DIY line up: https://www.ebay.de/itm/BOSCH-Schwamm-fur-Konturen-best-fur-Contour-mittel-2609256349-/122920761708 (ebay Link just for reference) which are not color coded, all of them are blue. BUT: They sell this as medium, but the grit is way coarse than 120, at least 80, maybe even "just" 60. And it seems not to be sold in all countries. If I switch from Germany to UK on the Bosch DIY site, I get the Professional sponge products.

BTW: Both the Festool and Bosch (Professional) sponges are made in the UK.

Pictures copyright by Bosch.






Personally I'd go with 60, 120, 220 for wood applications, rather than 120, 220, 800.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline mike_aa

  • Posts: 1078
when I was waaayyyy back in high school shop class, we used a wet/drysand paper.......

Tinker
@Tinker How many moons ago was that?   [big grin]

Mike A.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3717
at least >>>>>>>>>> oh! I
when I was waaayyyy back in high school shop class, we used a wet/drysand paper.......

Tinker
@Tinker How many moons ago was that?   [big grin]

Mike A.

can't count that far.

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker