Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 123605 times)

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Online threesixright

  • Posts: 362
One of my legs is getting compression bandages again and I'm overall very, very tired.   [unsure] [sad]  Just kicking back and relaxing at the moment.  [smile]
Ouch (that sucks!)  [scared] :( Got a hunch, long time no projects... ;)

Well take care and wish you well!
« Last Edit: August 06, 2019, 06:07 PM by threesixright »

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Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks!

What needs to be done will be done, that has always been, and always will be the case. But I'm just not going to spent additional time on documenting it online for the moment.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Euclid

  • Posts: 179
Oliver - it's hard to think of you inactive and not busy making or fixing something!

I hope you are finding enough to keep you cheerful (dreaming of new tools or new projects maybe?) and that you are fighting-fit again soon.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
It's incredible how time flies ...

Almost a year ago I asked about Farrow & Ball paint in this thread: http://festoolownersgroup.com/finishing/experience-with-paints-from-farrow-ball-flamant-i-e/

And while that specific M-B project is idling, there's another one coming up, turning part of the basement into more living space - and I got around ordering some samples. The paint samples arrived today, wallpaper samples are still on their way.

Colors:

No.81 Breakfast Room Green
No.88 Lamp Room Grey





Next step is cutting some drywall, applying primer, plaster, another primer and then painting it with the samples. Maybe tomorrow, or over the weekend.

And pretty much the same, once the wallpaper samples arrive.

The ceiling will be covered with panels giving it a concrete-look. Flooring will be oak, laminate not hardwood as there is still the vague chance of water entering, (although I will be building a barrier.) and I don't want to have to trash hardwood flooring. Both products from Parador.




Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Wallpaper samples arrived today, simply amazing.









Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2736
Great choices.  Going to transform that room!  Glad to see you back at your projects!

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Neil,

thank you very much! Yes it's going to be quite a transformation and right now we are in a phase where we constantly add stuff to consider/do while we are at it.

Looking for a local waste management/recycling company with rollable container(s) right now, that are large enough to take the old ceiling, drywall, flooring ... but can still be rolled from and to the street since our property is in a second row ...

And then hopefully they won't charge an arm and a leg for mixed waste, as I'm not going to separate the styrofoam/polystyrene from the wooden panels currently attached to the ceiling ... There will be more than enough dirt, dreadful black dust and saw chips ...

But the black dust is truly worst - so I will try to keep parts as large as possible, any cut that hasn't to be made is a good cut in that regard.  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
I got around to do some "quick and dirty" testing today. I will do a second round with a coat/layer of primer in between and see if that makes a difference. But ultimately we're pretty much set on the "Breakfast Room Green" - We will let this dry over night and see what it looks like tomorrow.







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4216
We have a lot of “sage green” in our house. Paler and less rich than your sample. Didn’t know we were looking for that, just arrived there while mixing colors looking for something we liked. Makes a pleasant background.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
A little "project" in between.

A family member asked me if I could replace a lightbulb (brake/rear light) on her lovely french kangaroo ... I said yes, although I hate this because every car is different and sometimes it involves quite a bit of gymnastics for the hand.

I looked at that cuddly french kangaroo rear light and somehow I had a funny urge/feeling that the Torx T20 T-Handle screwdriver wouldn't suffice ...

You grow by your mistakes. I saw 4 screws, so I took 4 screws out, realizing only then, that the whole assembly consists of two parts. The upper part, which is totally inactive/ no light fixtures. And the bottom part with all the fixtures and bulbs.

At least I was right. By removing the screws only, the light assembly would come loose on the screwed side only. I tried some tricks, moving it in different directions, press and pull ... And it always felt like it would break. I gave it a closer look, realized that the light assembly was held by 3 plastic pins that lock into some sort of socket. Now I knew why I had that urge/ funny feeling in first place and brought one of my "life savers" a non marring plastic pry bar. With that I was able to put enough pressure on those pins from the non-screwed side for them to pop out.

What I really ask myself is this: How is someone, without a speciality tool like that, supposed to change one of the bulbs at a remote gas station with no garage? I mean you get pulled over for this stuff, so you would want to fix that right away - especially when on the road in a foreign country. Maybe you're even smart enough to keep a set of spare bulbs (You can buy those as handy sets, coming in a plastic container, in Germany) but there is no way you're exchanging any of them for two reasons: On board tool set has no TX 20, and without a non marring pry bar you would have to yank out the light assembly in a straight line with enough force: you probably end up busting the wires/connector and loose/break a pin or two ... I don't get it. Enough of a rant, it was funny enough after all to use some of my tools on a car again.










If weather permits, tomorrow there will be another small wood/Festool-type project. :)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 778
Oliver, you must have real good taste, Farrow & Ball is the choice for the majority of my upmarket clients.
There is a Farrow & Ball showroom a few minutes drive from me. I never realised that with some extra thought, how much more beautiful, paint and wallpaper could be made to look.

They certainly know their stuff  [thumbs up]

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 542
I got around to do some "quick and dirty" testing today. I will do a second round with a coat/layer of primer in between and see if that makes a difference. But ultimately we're pretty much set on the "Breakfast Room Green" - We will let this dry over night and see what it looks like tomorrow.

It is my experience that the colour of the primer should be as close to the top coat’s. It will help get even coverage, which considering the price of F&B paints is going to save you serious dineros.
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + TSB1-MW 1000 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · OF2200 · CMS-GE … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 · Hammer HS950 (soon!) 

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Jiggy, Bert, Thank you very much!

Bert, can I send you a PM regarding a question or two I have about the whole primer thing?

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Advertisement (Because of visible Klein Tools, you guys now the drill by now ... ;) )

As promised some Festool/wood content. :)

I started this project by removing all hardware - I used my CXS with the brand new 50 mm Centrotec bits DB CE 50/12-Set 1 to remove the 10 PZ2 screws. The 3 mm t-handle hex wrench is needed to remove the handles first.
















Why is the restoration necessary you might ask? Because I messed up. Back when those doors where installed, I asked the carpenter who put them in for some advice on how to treat this door as it is the door of the master bathroom with quite a bit of humidity after showering/bathing - his answer was to use iron/steel wool  first and than use a coating. (I don’t remember what it was exactly) I did that, but I didn’t think of, or even knew, about all those little pieces of iron that would remain stuck in the rather soft wood of this massive door. After wiping the door with a tack cloth, it seemed to be OK. So I applied the coating. Only a year later all those little pieces of iron wool would stain/ turn black from the humidity (i.e. rust …) and I wasn’t exactly happy about it. But like with so many thing, there was always something more important to do … Today I finally took care of it.










No project without a little fun.  [eek] [scared] [blink] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [wink]




Sanding with my trusty DTS 400 and GranatNet abrasives, as almost always, my CTL SYS does the vacuuming.














The panels required quite a bit of hand sanding. I really like to use the Festool Granat sponge abrasives to do this. A lot can be done with the simple rectangular ones, but to get almost everywhere the shaped sponges are even better. As I have said in the past, these are highly, highly recommended!






















Next came sanding the molding on the frames. I found a product for this I wanted to try, it’s from Bosch Professional (probably SIA) and works really well for odd shapes/ molding as you can see in the pictures. It’s called: S473 Best for Contours sanding pad and comes, color coded, in 3 grits. It made sanding the molding a breeze! Highly recommended!












After sanding I vacuumed the door with the CTL SYS and one of the included nozzles. After that, I wiped the doors down with a slightly damp tack cloth. There’s still a bit of the iron wool left, but its much, much better than before.














Next I applied Clou water based Holzlack (wood lacquer).








After finishing both sides and letting them dry, I re-installed all the hardware. Again I used my CXS with the brand new 50 mm #Centrotec bits DB CE 50/12-Set 1 for the 10 PZ2 screws, and the t-handle hex wrench to install the handles.












Finished door back installed.



Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1746
Looks great Oliver!  Too bad about that poor guidance.  All that hand sanding made my hands hurts! 
-Raj

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2677
Awesome door restoration, Oliver! Great pics and explanation!!

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6447
It is my experience that the colour of the primer should be as close to the top coat’s. It will help get even coverage, which considering the price of F&B paints is going to save you serious dineros.

I agree with Bert...I've pretty much standardized on Sherwin-Williams paints and always have the primer tinted to 75% of the top coat color. There's just enough difference noticeable between the primer and the top coat which makes it easier to see when you're painting and it also reduces the number of top coats needed for complete coverage.

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2736
Great restoration on that door.  Your photos always pop so well, Oliver.  I can imagine you spend as much time on the photos as you do on the projects!

Thanks for keeping us engaged with your projects!

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 544
Great project with nice images, as always, Oliver! :)

FYI: Festool also does these „flexible“ sponges in Granat.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1287
Nice job refinishing the door, and great photography too.

Oliver, I noticed a rabbit which appear to be all around the edge of the door, is this
normal for interior doors where you live or is it just because it's a bathroom door?

Those sponge sanding pads saved the day. I was thinking at the beginning of the post
before you explained how you used the sanding sponges how I would tackle the
molded parts and was thinking is it possible to make a matching profile to the molding
then cover it with whatever grit paper you needed. I've known the sponges exist, but
was thinking about how it might be possible to make a pad for a sander with a linear
action to be able to work this area of the door. One door maybe not worth the effort
but if you had a house full of doors it would pay off.

Might be something like a kit that lets you cast in place to match the profile then fix
that to your sander (using Velcro, fast-fix, etc.) and use some self-stick paper in the
required grit.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 778
Great job on the door, it looks brand new!  [thumbs up]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Looks great Oliver!  Too bad about that poor guidance.  All that hand sanding made my hands hurts!

Thank you very much Raj! I guess I should have asked if there was more to it ... Maybe he thought I knew how to properly clean the door after ... I'm just happy it is only one door that I did it to.

Awesome door restoration, Oliver! Great pics and explanation!!

Thank you very much, Scot!

It is my experience that the colour of the primer should be as close to the top coat’s. It will help get even coverage, which considering the price of F&B paints is going to save you serious dineros.

I agree with Bert...I've pretty much standardized on Sherwin-Williams paints and always have the primer tinted to 75% of the top coat color. There's just enough difference noticeable between the primer and the top coat which makes it easier to see when you're painting and it also reduces the number of top coats needed for complete coverage.

Thank you very much, Cheese! Might be stupid to ask, but: They use the same Sherwin-Williams pigments to tint the primer, I guess?

Great restoration on that door.  Your photos always pop so well, Oliver.  I can imagine you spend as much time on the photos as you do on the projects!

Thanks for keeping us engaged with your projects!

Thank you very much, Neil! To be honest, I have my routine of settings and filters by now. And I do it all - except the selection process - on my phone.

So I look at them on the big screen, delete everything I don't need/want. Then I crop if needed/wanted, then settings and filters.

The most time consuming aspect is really taking the "in between" pictures. Stop working, clean hands, unlock phone, wipe over lens, take pictures. And a little more time consuming when I have to use a tripod/ phone holder. But I enjoy it, and I enjoy the pictures - being able to archive my work and steps taken to completion. On a easy/lazy day like yesterday anyways, just one thing to do and more than enough time for it. ;)

Great project with nice images, as always, Oliver! :)

FYI: Festool also does these „flexible“ sponges in Granat.

Thank you very much, Uli! Festool should have called them Contour sanding pads  [scared] [eek] [big grin] I actually have them ...  [eek] [scared] [eek] [blink]

Nice job refinishing the door, and great photography too.

Oliver, I noticed a rabbit which appear to be all around the edge of the door, is this
normal for interior doors where you live or is it just because it's a bathroom door?

Those sponge sanding pads saved the day. I was thinking at the beginning of the post
before you explained how you used the sanding sponges how I would tackle the
molded parts and was thinking is it possible to make a matching profile to the molding
then cover it with whatever grit paper you needed. I've known the sponges exist, but
was thinking about how it might be possible to make a pad for a sander with a linear
action to be able to work this area of the door. One door maybe not worth the effort
but if you had a house full of doors it would pay off.

Might be something like a kit that lets you cast in place to match the profile then fix
that to your sander (using Velcro, fast-fix, etc.) and use some self-stick paper in the
required grit.

Thank you very much Bob!

All of our doors are rebated, I'd dare to say it's the most commonly used pattern here. Not saying you won't find flush mounted ones in larger quantities if you look for them.

I think I'd be reluctant to use a machine on those molded parts - even if there was one available. I think the molding would lose it's "sharpness" too quickly. But since I don't have the Duplex, I don't know for sure how it would work on such delicate areas.

All the doors here are the same, except for the basement. But those will (now) be switched too, with the other upcoming project.

I think one could experiment with such custom molded sanding pads, however to match the profile when abrasive and maybe a 2nd layer go on top might be quite the challenge. But I love the idea of a kit to mold your own sanding pads on site. Sounds like a game changer if one could make it work. Really, it's a great idea! I would buy something like this!


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Great job on the door, it looks brand new!  [thumbs up]

Thank you very much, Jiggy!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6447

Thank you very much, Cheese! Might be stupid to ask, but: They use the same Sherwin-Williams pigments to tint the primer, I guess?


Yes Oliver they use the same color match system and pigments, they just tint it a tad lighter than the top coat. Also, FWIW...every SW primer tints a little differently because the base is a little different.

Nice job on the door it came out well.  [big grin]

Funny thing about the steel wool recommendation, it's been a popular final step for years & years. I can remember my grandfather using #0000 steel wool for the final finishing step 60 years ago. I think the difference is, it was most popular when solid color, oil-based topcoats were the norm. I think the oil-base paint provided better protection from humidity while the solid color hid any issues that developed over time. However it became a different ballgame with the arrival of water-based clear coats.

On a related but different note, that's the reason you keep tools for working stainless separate from other tools. Any sanding sponges, sanding sheets, grinding wheels, files that have been used on steel should NEVER be used on stainless because they will transfer iron oxide to the stainless and it will rust, as you found out the hardway.  [sad]

Those Bosch S473 sponges look pretty slick. Did they "smear" the profile at all or is it still sharp? I have a LS 130 but have found that the sandpaper is too thick and doesn't conform to small profiles well so it tends to smear the form. It's probably also a function that it's being motor driven. Sometimes less = more.

I checked and those S473 sponges are NAINA. They are available however from Amazon UK. 

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Cheese,

Thank you! I will ask my F&B dealer to tint the primer then, I guess they should be able to.

Do you remember what your Grandfather used to clean the surfaces after using steel wool. And yeah, 0000 it was - that I remember. And I think you're right on the type of paints/coats making a difference, too!

Yes, that is a must. I keep my stainless bit set sealed in a zip lock, as well as a couple of screwdrivers.

The sanding pads did not exactly smear the profile, but it's less sharp than on the other doors. You won't notice it while looking at it, but you can feel it, slightly.

Don't hunt for the S473 if you can get your hands on the Festool Granat sponges, I went looking for my after Uli mentioned them, and they are probably exactly the same ... except for the abrasive itself? I would love to know if Festools sponges are made in the UK, if they are - the Bosch are as well. I wouldn't be surprised if there is only one real manufacturer for these sponges and the only difference is the quality of abrasive and bonding.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 852
Oliver, that door was a real labor of love.  Nice work!


I also like the idea of a kit for molding to a profile.  I've tried machining wood pieces, but that takes a lot of time and, like Cheese, I've also had problems with sandpaper that is just too stiff to wrap - and sometimes the thickness changes the profile


For a while in the 2000's my company used a packing system where we put instruments in a plastic bag in a box and then sprayed foam in the box to provide the needed protection against drops.  It was kind of cool to watch.  Seems like something like that could work for creating sanding profiles if you could figure out how to get the grit on the surface.  I wonder if any of the home insulation foams are stiff and durable enough to work?  I'm brainstorming here, but what about putting a velcro-compatible piece of cloth against a molding, spraying the foam against that, and then fitting some sanding mesh to the cloth?

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1287
Oliver, that door was a real labor of love.  Nice work!


I also like the idea of a kit for molding to a profile.  I've tried machining wood pieces, but that takes a lot of time and, like Cheese, I've also had problems with sandpaper that is just too stiff to wrap - and sometimes the thickness changes the profile


For a while in the 2000's my company used a packing system where we put instruments in a plastic bag in a box and then sprayed foam in the box to provide the needed protection against drops.  It was kind of cool to watch.  Seems like something like that could work for creating sanding profiles if you could figure out how to get the grit on the surface.  I wonder if any of the home insulation foams are stiff and durable enough to work?  I'm brainstorming here, but what about putting a velcro-compatible piece of cloth against a molding, spraying the foam against that, and then fitting some sanding mesh to the cloth?

That's sort of what I was thinking of Harvey. I can remember unboxing Rosemount transmitters  with packaging like that you describe. I believe lots of companies use it. I wonder if the expanding foam in a can like Great Stuff would work. You'd have to build a small box to contain it and cover the surface to be duplicated with plastic. Maybe use a weak spray adhesive to hold the plastic sheet tight to the profile to be duplicated, and work the plastic film tight into the crevices with a stiff brush, then pour and let it set up. Anyway, this is taking Oliver's thread WOT, and should be discussed elsewhere if it has any real potential. Sorry Oliver, back to our regularly scheduled program.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4216
@six-point socket II It’s always good to check out your thread. Please keep it up.

Steel wool is perfectly fine as long as the finish is oil based. When it’s water based you have to use synthetic wool (Scotch Bright) or try to find bronze wool.

@HarveyWildes This is what you’re inventing.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2019, 04:42 PM by Michael Kellough »

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3719


That's sort of what I was thinking of Harvey. I can remember unboxing Rosemount transmitters  with packaging like that you describe. I believe lots of companies use it. I wonder if the expanding foam in a can like Great Stuff would work. You'd have to build a small box to contain it and cover the surface to be duplicated with plastic. Maybe use a weak spray adhesive to hold the plastic sheet tight to the profile to be duplicated, and work the plastic film tight into the crevices with a stiff brush, then pour and let it set up. Anyway, this is taking Oliver's thread WOT, and should be discussed elsewhere if it has any real potential. Sorry Oliver, back to our regularly scheduled program.
[/quote]

I think this molding discussion is OT. Oliver points out in his original naming of the topic, "...and other stuff." This entire thread has been an ongoing education. Oliver has been a light for a lot of subjects. Those who have replied have also come up with great questions, and the replies/answers have been very enlightening. Every time this thread pops up in my Replies list, my curiosity gets the better of me. I just have to investigate.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1034
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Oliver, that door was a real labor of love.  Nice work!


Thank you very much, Harvey!

Oliver, that door was a real labor of love.  Nice work!


I also like the idea of a kit for molding to a profile.  I've tried machining wood pieces, but that takes a lot of time and, like Cheese, I've also had problems with sandpaper that is just too stiff to wrap - and sometimes the thickness changes the profile


For a while in the 2000's my company used a packing system where we put instruments in a plastic bag in a box and then sprayed foam in the box to provide the needed protection against drops.  It was kind of cool to watch.  Seems like something like that could work for creating sanding profiles if you could figure out how to get the grit on the surface.  I wonder if any of the home insulation foams are stiff and durable enough to work?  I'm brainstorming here, but what about putting a velcro-compatible piece of cloth against a molding, spraying the foam against that, and then fitting some sanding mesh to the cloth?

That's sort of what I was thinking of Harvey. I can remember unboxing Rosemount transmitters  with packaging like that you describe. I believe lots of companies use it. I wonder if the expanding foam in a can like Great Stuff would work. You'd have to build a small box to contain it and cover the surface to be duplicated with plastic. Maybe use a weak spray adhesive to hold the plastic sheet tight to the profile to be duplicated, and work the plastic film tight into the crevices with a stiff brush, then pour and let it set up. Anyway, this is taking Oliver's thread WOT, and should be discussed elsewhere if it has any real potential. Sorry Oliver, back to our regularly scheduled program.

No problem, Bob! I love the discussions and idea sharing evolving from this, and other, threads! :)

@six-point socket II It’s always good to check out your thread. Please keep it up.

Steel wool is perfectly fine as long as the finish is oil based. When it’s water based you have to use synthetic wool (Scotch Bright) or try to find bronze wool.

@HarveyWildes This is what you’re inventing.

Thank you very much, Michael! That's a great find, I didn't even know it existed. Don't think I ever saw that in real life on the shelf or in the catalog.

Quote


That's sort of what I was thinking of Harvey. I can remember unboxing Rosemount transmitters  with packaging like that you describe. I believe lots of companies use it. I wonder if the expanding foam in a can like Great Stuff would work. You'd have to build a small box to contain it and cover the surface to be duplicated with plastic. Maybe use a weak spray adhesive to hold the plastic sheet tight to the profile to be duplicated, and work the plastic film tight into the crevices with a stiff brush, then pour and let it set up. Anyway, this is taking Oliver's thread WOT, and should be discussed elsewhere if it has any real potential. Sorry Oliver, back to our regularly scheduled program.

I think this molding discussion is OT. Oliver points out in his original naming of the topic, "...and other stuff." This entire thread has been an ongoing education. Oliver has been a light for a lot of subjects. Those who have replied have also come up with great questions, and the replies/answers have been very enlightening. Every time this thread pops up in my Replies list, my curiosity gets the better of me. I just have to investigate.
Tinker

Thank you very much, Tinker! Thats a big compliment coming from you! :) I love the discussion and idea sharing evolving from this, and other, threads! :)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver