Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 164594 times)

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Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Anyone remember these? There were also some that had a bit holder instead of the slotted blade.

Oregon Easydriver by Omark Industries. Was my Belgian grandpa's, gifted to me during the 90ties, found it while being busy in the basement.











Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

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Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
I remember we having an Oregon driver, also others would have. A very long time since I have seen one now. The Coca driver is cool, with bottle opener and all. I love tiny slotted drivers, this I would want to have in my apron, most for show. I use these small drivers for everything.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Oh, that Coke thingy. That is not a screwdriver. That is for when I get my 70ties on ... That is an original bar room ice pick w/ bottle opener! It's only missing the front cap/ferrule.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 684
Yeah, I have one of those. Not sure if it i branded the same. Have to look it up...

Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + TSB1-MW 1000 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · OF2200 · CMS-GE · Vecturo 18 Li · TID 18 · TKS 80 EBS-Set · … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 · Hammer HS950 | TaigaTools VacPods Pro Set
Wishlist: ETS EC 125 w 150 pad, DTS

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Went to look after this today, after I more or less accidentally stumbled over the bill for this work. Gladly I will only pay 1/50 of that bill in the end. But it's still funny enough to post. I decided I won't get worked up about this stuff anymore, I will just collect it for future reference, for the right time & place so to speak.

Work by: German master electrician company (small business type). 9 hrs (1.5hrs driving time) over 2 days, 2 people. Additionally a horn was installed over this box (2m cable length ...). Total: exceeded 500 Euro incl. VAT.










Have fun!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1739

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 675
Oliver, it really looks like you got screwed! ;P

...sorry could not leave the pun alone.

As always, if you want it done right, do it yourself.
A shame what people feel to be able to write invoices for, today.

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 684
Oliver, you should report them to the proper authority. My guess is that the 'Meister' sent his most wayward employees to you. Or if it was he who did this, his title should be taken away from him. Don’t you have some kind of ‘…Kammer’ organisation that looks after the proper wat of doing things?
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + TSB1-MW 1000 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · OF2200 · CMS-GE · Vecturo 18 Li · TID 18 · TKS 80 EBS-Set · … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 · Hammer HS950 | TaigaTools VacPods Pro Set
Wishlist: ETS EC 125 w 150 pad, DTS

Offline Ron B

  • Posts: 22
The Easydriver is a great tool.  I have two of  them on my workbench.  I bought them in late 1970's or early 1980's.  Amazing torque.  They let you put down pressure on a screw and lets you get those difficult screws backed out.  It is a very handy tool when hanging drywall.  If a drywall screw is a little high, you can give them another quarter turn and get that screw just right.  Mine has a shaft that allows me to change the tips instead of the whole screwdriver shaft.  This is one of those tools that I wonder why they stopped making them.  I rank it right up there next to a Studebaker Champ.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
[blink]

Oliver, it really looks like you got screwed! ;P

...sorry could not leave the pun alone.

As always, if you want it done right, do it yourself.
A shame what people feel to be able to write invoices for, today.

Oliver, you should report them to the proper authority. My guess is that the 'Meister' sent his most wayward employees to you. Or if it was he who did this, his title should be taken away from him. Don’t you have some kind of ‘…Kammer’ organisation that looks after the proper wat of doing things?

Thanks! Of course I could report this, but then 49 people would be helluva mad at me, because I know that if any supervising authority looks at this (and all the rest ...) they're going to simply shut the garage down until everything is repaired/maintained properly. The garage is critical infrastructure so to speak, there's no way the 35 to 40 cars parked there constantly find a spot around the neighborhood. So from that point of view I'm really not that much interested in getting real authorities or the utility involved. I know the result. I will obviously do that the very second I see something that poses an imminent threat to life/health.

What I did of course, as there is an administrator in charge, I informed them with (the same) pictures and what I think about it. (Like the last couple of times ...) Their decision.

I can't wait for the next owner meeting. The same question will come up, from 2/3 or more: "Do we really need to repair/maintain this, is it really necessary?", then a vote takes place, and nothing except for bare necessities will be done. (If anything at all.)

This is also the reason there is absolutely no "DIY" on this.

The Easydriver is a great tool.  I have two of  them on my workbench.  I bought them in late 1970's or early 1980's.  Amazing torque.  They let you put down pressure on a screw and lets you get those difficult screws backed out.  It is a very handy tool when hanging drywall.  If a drywall screw is a little high, you can give them another quarter turn and get that screw just right.  Mine has a shaft that allows me to change the tips instead of the whole screwdriver shaft.  This is one of those tools that I wonder why they stopped making them.  I rank it right up there next to a Studebaker Champ.

Totally agree, I should have that shaft/bit holder somewhere. I remember I used it before, now that you mention it! I will have a look if I can find it. Great tool indeed!

Had to look up the Studebaker, that's a fantastic ride! If I may ask, you own & maintain one?

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
Snip: “ I can't wait for the next owner meeting. The same question will come up, from 2/3 or more: "Do we really need to repair/maintain this, is it really necessary?", then a vote takes place, and nothing except for bare necessities will be done. (If anything at all.)

This is also the reason there is absolutely no "DIY" on this.”

Oh.. I feel with you; been there, done that. And now it’s part of my day job (but luckily very seldom totally lack of insight, or will to listen to professional advises)
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
I'm not loosing sleep over this, Stig.

The truth is, I could list our lot/parking space at the local grocery store's blackboard today for anything from 15 to 20k and it would be taken by tomorrow. Only actual cost, transfer of the title at a notary/conveyancer.

And if I gave it a little more time, I could offer it to banks or housing investor/investment companies in the 3 big cities surrounding ours, and make 25 to 30k off it.

There is not much going to change that situation, and once they start working on "our" street in 21 or 22 (complete re-build incl. sewer ...), parking spaces will even be more scarce then they are right now. Which means that number can only go up.

No one would bat an eye at the electrical installation/ water ingress - at least until it has become a real problem. The reason for that is, many of the owners are fairly old and rent out the space. But not with a contract/ rental agreement. They don't declare the "income" ... So they think they don't have to abide by the laws concerning landlords and the corresponding obligations. ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: August 09, 2020, 12:59 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi everyone,

This morning I received shipping confirmation of some of the parts I'm gonna be needing for the basement built-in cabinet. So time to think about how I'm going to drill the 35mm holes for the concealed hinges. I decided against drilling them just by hand, instead I will be using my old drill stand and corresponding drill. (I will be utilizing the Centrotec-Jacobs-Chuck-Adaptor and a Centrotec chuck to use my Centrotec-Zobo drill bits.)

Even earlier than the shipping confirmations, warnings from "Nina" (our German governments warning system/app) came through about an extraordinaire heat (wave) today. So instead of getting a brain freeze from the AC, I decided to go into the basement workshop and clean, maintain and adjust the drill stand.

Here are a couple of pictures from after I had completed the cleaning/overhaul.















Scale is spot on. I will still test drill in a scrap piece first. ;)




Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4873
“(I will be utilizing the Centrotec-Jacobs-Chuck-Adaptor and a Centrotec chuck to use my Centrotec-Zobo drill bits.)“

 [poke]Oliver, why not leave the adapters in the drawer and put the six-sided ZOBO bit directly in the three-jawed AEG chuck?

Seriously, every extra coupling adds a little more runout, and the Centrotec shank is a bit undersized for a 35mm cutter anyway, imo. And you don’t want the hinge hole to be too large.

Probably because you will also use a smaller ZOBO bit for the fasteners? [huh]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Michael,

you hit the nail on the head, although it's not going to be another Zobo bit, but the 5mm CE- carbide bit w/depth stop and probably the CE- hinge drill bit.

I'm not worrying much about runout here, I've used the adapter before - albeit not together with drill stand - but with the same machine, and also another Hilti - and that worked very well. I trust this stuff.

But like I said, I will do some testing for depth setting, so I can always rely on chucking it directly if the CE adaptor gives me trouble. I will keep an eye on that.

I basically don't really like chucking the hex shaft (CE stuff) directly, it's pretty short, then comes the detent - and chucking it deeper - on the round surface is really not ideal.

I agree that the shaft diameter is fairly small for 35mm.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
Oh, that AEG drill.. a fantastic piece of equipment, with state of the art electronics - amazing for that time, and in some way still is!
We have that same drill stand at our cabin. Reminds me to “rescue” it before someone else does..
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Stig, you're familiar with the system, then? Mid/late seventies iirc. This is the stuff I learned with, under my dad's supervision. And I used them on some of my first projects.




















Jigsaw is a separate machine.







There's a separate sanders as well, need to take some pictures when I have the time.

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: August 11, 2020, 12:25 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 675
What? Oliver, you have the whole set, still?


In my parents garage there is the „table saw“ attachment somewhere. But I have never seen it in action...

If you like a challenge, how about using only AEG instead of Festool for the built-in.

Someday you need to host us for an extensive workshop tour of the palace you call your shop. :)

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2446
I have that exact jigsaw table but mine is Bosch and I still occasionally use my ancient Bosch 1582 in it.  It's great for fabbing smaller pieces.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4873
I have that exact jigsaw table but mine is Bosch and I still occasionally use my ancient Bosch 1582 in it.  It's great for fabbing smaller pieces.

I have the same stuff. Also very portable. A Sys2 contains the table, jigsaw, and about a 100 blades with room to spare.

Also have a similar table that’s made for older Metabo jigsaws if anyone has a use for it.

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
Wow! You have the lot.. almost! [blink]
I remember the jigsaw, but it’s not around anymore. I recognise the table saw attachment, that one also gone. So yes I remember. AEG had (maybe first) similar to Festool CMS system, all high quality.

I used to use that particular drill to polish my cars, my first encounter with constant speed electronics - it was in fact THE only drill I found which was controllable with the constant speed control when polishing at lower speeds. And the sound it makes 😎, it oozes quality.

When I bought my house, I was among many other things left with the AEG sander attachment - I’ll post a pic tomorrow  [wink]

Edit: Pics of the missing Schwing-schleifer:


« Last Edit: August 12, 2020, 06:01 PM by FestitaMakool »
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi everyone,

What? Oliver, you have the whole set, still?


In my parents garage there is the „table saw“ attachment somewhere. But I have never seen it in action...

If you like a challenge, how about using only AEG instead of Festool for the built-in.

Someday you need to host us for an extensive workshop tour of the palace you call your shop. :)

Maybe someday, but in general, I think you'd be pretty underwhelmed after seeing it.

I have that exact jigsaw table but mine is Bosch and I still occasionally use my ancient Bosch 1582 in it.  It's great for fabbing smaller pieces.

Totally agree, maneuvering small pieces to and around the saw blade is much easier/ nicer to control than vice versa.

I have that exact jigsaw table but mine is Bosch and I still occasionally use my ancient Bosch 1582 in it.  It's great for fabbing smaller pieces.

I have the same stuff. Also very portable. A Sys2 contains the table, jigsaw, and about a 100 blades with room to spare.

Also have a similar table that’s made for older Metabo jigsaws if anyone has a use for it.

Somehow I can't give up the old metal case, I will show it in the next post. :) But if I'd use it frequently, Systainer it would be, definitely!

Wow! You have the lot.. almost! [blink]
I remember the jigsaw, but it’s not around anymore. I recognise the table saw attachment, that one also gone. So yes I remember. AEG had (maybe first) similar to Festool CMS system, all high quality.

I used to use that particular drill to polish my cars, my first encounter with constant speed electronics - it was in fact THE only drill I found which was controllable with the constant speed control when polishing at lower speeds. And the sound it makes 😎, it oozes quality.

When I bought my house, I was among many other things left with the AEG sander attachment - I’ll post a pic tomorrow  [wink]

Yes, quality was incredible for it's time and still is. Wait for next post. ;) But given all the new regulations, all this stuff can't be used commercially anymore. (Sometimes it's good to be a DIY'er ;) )

Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
As promised some more pictures. :)

Orbital sander. Including dust extracting attachment/ shoe type.






The full AEG jig saw kit. Jig saw STSE 350, jig saw table ZT-ST and the yellow metal case.






Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
And now, let's start with the basement build-in cabinet makeover.

Overview:



Concealed hinges:






Hettich Sensys 8645i with internal damping. (110°, TH52. 9073605)





Hettich mounting place System 8099 (D=3mm. 9075082)





Hettich Covers 9088250 & 9088251


This is what it will look like when installed:



Hettich jigs 0000351 (right); 0045150 (left)



Handles. Also Hettich, or so I thought. ...









Quality is not so great, very simply made. The screws that came with the handles are also pretty bad ones. (I fathomed that, so I ordered different ones that should arrive any day.)

I was wondering why I couldn't find these handles on Hettich.com while I was in the process of ordering all the stuff.

This is the reason:



Hettich has a DIY/DIY-market type line of products that can only be accessed through hettich-diy.com aufrufen While products are the same as from the professional line, especially the offered handles vary greatly

When I found these handles listed under "budget" : https://web2.hettich.com/hbh/catalog/Start.do?localeId=de&model=procat_diy&procatTheme=diy&subProjects=false  everything made sense suddenly.

Given they are for the basement, and given what I paid for them - it's OK.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6307
  • Festool Baby.....
looking fwd to the pictures and the step by step buddy

Offline Ron B

  • Posts: 22
Oliver-Sorry I was slow to reply.  On Aug 6th when we were discussing easydrivers, you asked if I have a 1964 Studebaker Champ, and I just saw that reply.  I had a rather rare one, but not anymore.  I had a 1964 3/4 ton V8-they only made 204 of that type in 64, their last year in business in the  United States. The windshield, doors, fenders and front of the truck were the same as a Studebaker Lark car with just a different grille.  The bed was left-over stampings from Dodge and was too side for the cab. The truck was built like a tank-had 58 leaf springs.  I took the springs apart once and painted them, and still remember just the springs weighed 290 lbs.   It was a great truck, although what I would really would like to have is a 1937 Studebaker Coupe Express. Look that one up to see a truck with style.  I enjoy your comments, Oliver, sorry I did  not respond. 


Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks for your reply Ron. Don't worry about overseeing a post, that happens. I'm glad you still caught it.

That must be some great memories, it's definitely a great truck! I checked out this 1937 Studebaker Coupe Express ( https://hymanltd.com/vehicles/5584-1937-studebaker-coupe-express-truck/ ) what can I say ... they don't make them like they used to. Simply amazing. I could see myself driving one. Those fenders, the headlights ... the whole style. Impeccable.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Time to post some "before" pictures. You can see that I made a little mistake in my first sketch that I drew just from recollection.





Then I measure everything, starting with the doors. Then removed the doors and some trim, to measure everything else.



Now I'm working on the good sketch/drawing and a cut list.


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
With some help from my dad, who learned drawing in the beginning of his career, the drawings were made.





Don't worry about the missing kerf on the cut list for the doors, it was just to check if everything fits well within a single board.

Plywood has been ordered, now.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Current state of affairs.

By now, everything that will ultimately be replaced is removed.







Of course no project goes as planned, I will need to expand the tiled floor up to under the radiator now.

I found a treasure:

An old Quartett card game card with a Porsche 912 on it, a crown cap from Hannen brewery: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannen-Brauerei (sadly this entry is not available in english), a marble and a Pfennig: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pfennig .



Tuesday or Wednesday the plywood is going to get delivered, then that work will continue.




Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International