Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 153750 times)

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Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1005
Oliver, go for it man.  I rented one of those dumpers  years ago for a job where we couldn't get the concrete truck close and I didn't want to deal with a concrete pumper. So we ran a whole truck load of concrete in to the site and it was a blast.  [big grin]

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Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1738
Oliver,

till I read that the old one is out of stone (not wood) I had an excellent plan for easy and convenient removal of the old one, would have combined nicely with you liking for barbecue:


(lifted from redd.it)

 [big grin]

Looking forward for what beautiful things you'll do this time. Regarding small gaps to have no look-through onto the old one: You wrote that it's under a roof... if rain wouldn't be an issue, what about groove and tongue for the decking? Should be straightforward to rip one/some of the floor boards into tongues and manually route matching grooves into the rest, possibly just pushing them upright through a CMS-TS or a TKS (which I could, given the stars line up right date wise, borrow for some days as you're en route to friends of mine which are in need for a visit or two this year) for a shallow hidden cut that does that particular trick?

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
 [scared] [big grin] Demolition by fire.

Thanks for the offer Gregor, but I do have all the tools I need to do something like that. I got recommended tongue & groove before, but I'm not sure it's what we're going with.

Right now we're exploring the wpc/composite route, there are aluminum frames/substructure available and lips to close gaps. And it's low maintenance once installed.

But nothing is said and done yet. I have a quote coming my way, so lets see waht figure we're talking about when buying a complete system.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7514

And demolishing the old patio, transporting & dumping the stuff, then transporting materials for the new patio ... All over that dirt track. That is not for me anymore.

So I always said, half jokingly, I'll do it when I get one of these small track dumpers:
most
https://www.wackerneuson.de/en/products/dumpers/track-dumpers/


FWIW...Oliver...in the US this is a pretty common piece of equipment for small landscape projects. Very similar to the Wacker as it's also a walk-behind machine. Also being only 34" wide, it can pass through most every fence gate/opening. Because it is a tracked vehicle the footprint it places on the ground is only about 5 psi.

I rented one with a bucket when I put in the patio to move dirt, class-5, sand & pea gravel and also rented the forks to move pallets of brick and blue stone. There are so many things you can use these things for. Here is a link to all of the options that will fit the Toro Dingo. The rental price was cheap considering the amount of work this little beast can do.

https://www.toro.com/en/professional-contractor/compact-utility-attachments

« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 11:21 AM by Cheese »

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Terrific machine @Cheese ! Thanks for sharing!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Today I put a new top on top of my old workshop desk.

I used the leftover from the 40mm MPX bought for the pedestal. Since I didn't know I would use it for this, it wasn't observed when the pedestal top was cut, so the scraps weren't an exact fit. I needed 1300x660 but the biggest scrap piece was only 1250x"larger than 660". So I had to add a 50mm strip.

Using the TSC to cut both pieces to size. I'm always pleased with the results of the TSC with the installed 48 tooth saw blade.





Perfect fit.





Cut the strip to length.



Now into the workshop.

The strip is 50mm wide, I decided to drill 20mm deep blind holes with 8mm diameter (approx. head size of Spax universal screw with T25 drive) and then use 50mm long screws to butt joint the two pieces.







Add adhesive/glue and screw down.







Since the blind holes are 8mm in diameter, I decided, on the fly, to close them with common/readily available wood dowels.









Last chance to get a "before" picture.



And then all that was left to do is layout and marking the positions of the screws, drill pilot hole and counter sink.







I decided to add a little edge strip, I used the amazing GRK FinTrim for this - but I have to say that they work a lot better in MPX and hard wood. Then they pull much more cleanly into the wood, than with this soft wood strip. I only had experience with them in hardwood/MPX so far, that's why I used them - and didn't countersink the holes for them.





Then it's all said and done. Finished. ;)




Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6214
  • Festool Baby.....
Looking good Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thank you very much @jobsworth :) All the little things that have to get squared away ... :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

So I used the cool morning time to evaluate if the MMS+ concrete bolts/anchors from Heco would work with my old patio, in terms of bolting/anchoring a substructure to it.

Mark and drill.





Of course with dust extraction and additionally I blew out the holes, and then used my inspection camera. As you can see, the changeover from actual stone plate/tile to foundation is clearly visible - but there is no topsoil, gravel or whatever. That made me very happy, as it was the first indication that it might actually work. (Could have been very different, only a thin layer of adhesive followed by gravel or the like ...)







So lets try to bolt/anchor a scrap piece down.

First with the cordless 1/2" impact wrench.





Then with the cordless 3/8" impact wrench.





Amazing - that is bolted/anchored down, bomb proof!



Then the removal, to make sure the stone plates/tiles did not split or get damaged otherwise that would impair the bolts/anchors ability to hold the substructure.







Since these MMS+ bolts/anchors from Heco feature counter sink heads, let's see if they did. ;) Oh, and how they did!





I'm very happy that this turned out to be a viable option now, it saves me a lot of headaches.

Actually, that scrap piece was bolted/anchored down that well, that I'm sure even if a bolt/anchor or two would not seat properly, or one of the stone plates/tiles would split - the others would still hold/lock the substructure safely to the old patio.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6214
  • Festool Baby.....
Thank you very much @jobsworth :) All the little things that have to get squared away ... :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

I have a lot to do to Oliver.

 But dont have your motivation for getting them done  [big grin]

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 667
I have a lot to do to Oliver.

 But dont have your motivation for getting them done  [big grin]

Couldn’t have said it better.
Oliver, you are always such a powerhouse and inspiration to get oneself off the couch and get going! :)

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
You're giving me way too much credit here. I just do what I love.

Got a strong reminder that life can be darn short, last Thursday. Or better, on Monday when we heard about it: A neighbor from a couple of houses down the street wasn't feeling well, asked his wife to call an ambulance. Ambulance came, they administered/ hooked him up to an ECG, sure enough it was a mild cardiac infarction. The got him to the hospital alive, then out of sudden he went into cardiac arrest. Doctor & nurses got him back for a moment, then he got a full blown cardiac infarction and was pronounced dead. Turns out, he had an undiagnosed/hidden heart condition.  [crying]

All while his wife was waiting in the waiting area of the hospital, thinking they got there in time because he was alive when he was taken in. I can't begin to imagine how she feels right now.  [crying]

What I want to say, carpe diem/ seize the day. Do what you love, and surround yourself with the people you love. Tomorrow is promised to none of us.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6214
  • Festool Baby.....
Yeah Oliver that certainly is a wake up call isnt it.

Ya got me motivated buddy, Ibeen milking this work so much its mooing at me :>D.

But I hit it hard today.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Yeah, it certainly is.

Ya got me motivated buddy, Ibeen milking this work so much its mooing at me :>D.

lmao. That is a first one for me.


Back to our regular scheduled programming. I'm currently ordering stuff, will be picking up some paint on Monday or Tuesday. And then the two radiators in the living room will get a new coat of paint. That's the next "in between" project, while deciding on how to go about that built-in cabinet in the basement.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Picked up some stuff for a quick, "in-between" project from the Honey-do list. Painting the living room radiators.  [scared]




Sadly, it seems that those professional points of sale have no honor left. I called last week to learn how much that paint is, went there today and they quoted me a totally different price. Asking about it, they claimed they would have never quoted me that price they gave over the phone last week. Sadly I only wrote down the price, not who I was talking to. Lesson learned. But as usual, I will never buy from them again.


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 9271
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
I'm not sure that painting radiators sounds like a quick in between job?  Sounds like tedium to me.

  And that paint store stuck you with bent brushes too  [eek]  Surprised you didn't notice that when you picked them up! [big grin]

Seth

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Compared to that basement built-in cabinet project, that paint job is a quick project. But since I will have to wait for the materials anyway, its good timing to do the radiators first.

And yes, it's not the most exciting project/work. Sanding two radiators, each 1900mm long and about 300mm wide and 300mm tall, by hand will get old in no time I guess. But it has to be done. I'm also going to take down the windowsill on both radiators, that's going to get interesting.

Oh snap, now that you mention it, yes they did sell me bent brushes. Scandalous!  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6629
I'm not sure that painting radiators sounds like a quick in between job?  Sounds like tedium to me.

It is tedious indeed, I've done quite a few radiators by now, and it takes ages to paint them. In fact, I quit doing it with a brush and roller, I now just buy cans of spray paint, that makes it a lot quicker. You do have to mask all the surroundings of course, and live with a bad paint smell for a few hours.

By the way, those special "radiator" paints are a big scamm, they're just as heat resistant as any normal paint from a decent brand.

When you paint a radiator, make sure you sand it very well, by hand. The smoothness of the metal and the old coat can make sure your new coat sticks very badly if you don't sand properly.

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 667
What Alex said! Had great results using spray cans and if you use „Malervlies“ to cover the surroundings, it takes the overspray a little better out of the air, compared to foil...

No wonder the store ripped you off on pricing. The expensive mitered brushes... ;P

I hope your next purchasing experience turns out better.
I got lucky with a new wood supplier recently. 30mins more to drive but higher quality and lower price than the one I already purchased a ton of over the last year...

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7514
When you paint a radiator, make sure you sand it very well, by hand. The smoothness of the metal and the old coat can make sure your new coat sticks very badly if you don't sand properly.

That’s the reason we bring them to a sand blaster. Drop them off one day and pick them up the next.  [big grin]

Online FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 532
What Cheese said!
Oh, it’s tedious..

I guess (and hope) you have the older radiators?  [eek] Cause they hold up.
From my experience in my work, the new convectors are PITA.. On some samples the metal is so thin as it’s the paint what’s keep them sealed.. until paint let go.. oh no.. and the water needs to be filtered or they clog internally and in the valve. So don’t go new unless offered extremely long and wide warranty.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
I'm not sure that painting radiators sounds like a quick in between job?  Sounds like tedium to me.

It is tedious indeed, I've done quite a few radiators by now, and it takes ages to paint them. In fact, I quit doing it with a brush and roller, I now just buy cans of spray paint, that makes it a lot quicker. You do have to mask all the surroundings of course, and live with a bad paint smell for a few hours.

By the way, those special "radiator" paints are a big scamm, they're just as heat resistant as any normal paint from a decent brand.

When you paint a radiator, make sure you sand it very well, by hand. The smoothness of the metal and the old coat can make sure your new coat sticks very badly if you don't sand properly.

Hi Alex,

thanks for the reminder to be thoroughly when sanding!

I have no real experience with paints & radiators. I tried the spray cans once on a basement radiator, it was disastrous. Because I had no idea what I was doing, and no "guidance" on how it is properly done. That's why I wanted to go with a roller and brushes.

Speaking of the paint. I tossed a coin. Basically. I had one guy I trust tell me I could use the Satiné (for example) and the other guy I trust said that those alkyd based paints turn "yellow" quicker with the heat of the radiators.

Speaking of the price, given what I paid for Satiné at that place, and now paid for the Specotherm. Not much difference. In fact, the Specotherm was about 20 bucks cheaper than if I had bought the same amount of Satiné. So I don't view it as a scam per se. Of course, I don't know all the prices as there are so many different brands to be had, it's possible there are price ratios that are completely off. I'm sure you have the better oversight, Alex!

Since you are the second guy with experience in this field to tell me I could use regular paint, maybe I'll try that for that one basement radiator that needs to be painted with one of the following projects.

Thank you!

What Alex said! Had great results using spray cans and if you use „Malervlies“ to cover the surroundings, it takes the overspray a little better out of the air, compared to foil...

No wonder the store ripped you off on pricing. The expensive mitered brushes... ;P

I hope your next purchasing experience turns out better.
I got lucky with a new wood supplier recently. 30mins more to drive but higher quality and lower price than the one I already purchased a ton of over the last year...

I'll try and see if I can snap a picture of that basement radiator I went to work on with a spray can, when I reach that room. After that, you'll never hand me a spray can ever again.  [big grin]

When you paint a radiator, make sure you sand it very well, by hand. The smoothness of the metal and the old coat can make sure your new coat sticks very badly if you don't sand properly.

That’s the reason we bring them to a sand blaster. Drop them off one day and pick them up the next.  [big grin]

I wouldn't even know where to look for a sand blaster that can do 1.9m long radiators. Plus, removing and carrying them ... Thank you, no. If I was to remove them, there would have been new radiators installed.  [big grin]

What Cheese said!
Oh, it’s tedious..

I guess (and hope) you have the older radiators?  [eek] Cause they hold up.
From my experience in my work, the new convectors are PITA.. On some samples the metal is so thin as it’s the paint what’s keep them sealed.. until paint let go.. oh no.. and the water needs to be filtered or they clog internally and in the valve. So don’t go new unless offered extremely long and wide warranty.

There are 5 old radiators left. 2 in the living room, which are about to be painted. 1 in the basement that gets replaced once I'm working in that room. 1 in the basement that will get painted in due time. 1 upstairs that will be replaced like the rest.

I found a good quality radiator to replace the old ones with, and I don't expect any trouble. The manufacturer gives a 25 warranty and is a long standing German company. No worries there.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
More materials.






Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

One day - one radiator. As I've said, quick project in-between.  [big grin]

Getting ready.



Using a striking scraper to get the marble windowsill removed from the brackets. A few tender whacks, and it comes off. Funny enough, I only needed to do this once, the other 3 popped immediately, together with the first one. Then I used the same striking scraper to remove the cured, dry & very hard and brittle adhesive.







Hand sanding. Using the Festool sanding sponges, they are simply perfect for this type of stuff. Grit 120.



Vacuum and clean.



Preparing the paint.



Add masking tape to two important parts. ;)



Ready to go.



Taking a picture in between ist worth the time, helps you find some small spots you missed.



Better.



Removing the floor cover to get down to the feet - and then it's already all said and done.





I'm very happy with the results and so is my better half. I probably couldn't earn a living doing this, but compared to prior experiences, this was really smooth sailing all the way and the results are much, much better than what I expected initially. Shows again, good paint is worth its price. And since the windowsill is going back on top, what can be seen later on, is a lot less compared to what can be seen now.


Tomorrow it's time for radiator #2.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1005
Oliver, great results !  We had a few jobs where we cleaned/prepped/painted radiators. On others, we took them to a place in Washington DC that specialized in cleaning radiators with a chemical bath and sandblasting. That was a real thrill   [scared] [eek] because of all the work moving them. One customer I recall was thrilled because it turned out that the radiator was solid brass  [eek], but no one knew because there were about a zillion coats of paint on the radiator.

I think I like the look of the slab of stone on top versus the standard approach here in my area of having an enclosure built around the radiator.


Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Rob, thank you! Wow, solid brass radiator - I guess that were the old, golden days. Unbelievable these days. But I bet, once finished that was a real eye catcher. I hope it wasn't painted again?



Another day, another radiator.

Removing the windowsill.



Sanding.



A tiny one, that bites like a big one!  [big grin] Knipex Cobra XS ( 87 00 100 )



And then the mind wanders, thoughts and ideas form. This is an opportunity, so why not hang new wallpaper behind the radiator? So let's remove the wallpaper.



And when you plan on hanging fresh, new wallpaper. Why not re-do the silicone joints? So let's remove the silicone.



And then there is this tiny windowsill/ cover, that a little loose here and there. So why not take it out, clean it and then place it back in? Out it went.



At some point, everything that created dust, dirt and debris was done. So I cleaned the radiator and painted it. That went better than yesterday, I'm getting a hang to it. I also got the advice to keep it lukewarm while painting, that's supposed to help the paint laying down. I think it went great.





Of course that turns a "quick" 2 day project into at least a 3 day project. Tomorrow I want to remove one last silicone joint, then I'll hang the wallpaper behind the radiator, re-set the small/tiny windowsill/cover and then I'll put the marble windowsills back in. And a few other small things need to be taken care of as well.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1005
Oliver, I see you're falling victim to the dreaded "project creep" [eek] [big grin]

The brass radiator was NOT painted afterwards  [smile] [smile], the homeowner was THRILLED to see what was under all the paint. I recall the radiator  had very fine, artistic engravings in the brass, but all those were covered by the zillion coats of paint.

It was at about this time I got smart and found some local guys who moved radiators for a living.  Two big dudes with an old pickup and some handtrucks.  Good business model, low overhead. [big grin]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi everyone,

Since it's already very early Saturday morning when I'm writing this, this work was done yesterday. The 3rd day of what was originally a 2 day project.

I said, I wanted to remove another silicone joint and put a new one it. So let's start.



A cutter still works best.



And thats when I realized that it wasn't just a silicone joint, but the entire edge of that coated chipboard was covered with it. I never knew.







That posed the question of how to make that a nice, white edge. Anyway, whatever I would come up with, the boards needed to come out to be thoroughly cleaned and the edge to be treated somehow.











While doing this, I remembered I had some white leftover edge banding from an earlier project. But to use it, that edge had to be pure chipboard with no silicone present. So I used my Festool Pocket StickFix to clean and sand the edges. (Grit 120, Brilliant II)







Then edge banding with our iron.



Used the cutter to take off the excess edge banding and the Pocket StickFix to lightly sand over/ break the edge.







Time to clean the small windowsill/ cover.







And I repaired it in a spot where the plastic profiles used to custom build this became loose.



Then I mounted everything back in it's original place.





And while I let the adhesives set and dry. I went over into the other room to mount marble windowsill #1 again.





Between those to chipboard covers had always been a gap. Closed with silicone of course. I decided to use filler instead, I will have to lightly sand this tomorrow (today) and then it's done as well.



New silicone joints.





And finally I could mount marble windowsill #2. I used a straight edge to find out where I had to add a little to the brackets, as I knew from removing the old adhesive that it was very, very thick in one spot. Glued a scrap piece in place and added a generous amount of adhesive. Works perfectly fine, the adhesive is great stuff - sets nicely!









And that's what it looks like finished.



Special appearance, Würth Bond + Seal! Perfect adhesive for stuff like this. Highly recommended.



I hope you guys had some fun watching over my shoulders for the last 3 days. Another project finished.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2834
Great job, Oliver.  I feel productive just reading what you are doing!

I’m continually impressed with both your tools, your knowledge on taking on projects, and your motivation to get them done!


Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1377
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thank you very much, from the bottom of my heart, Neil! This coming, especially, from you, is such a huge compliment!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International