Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 164601 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
The "Messograf" from Cleo is not plastic. Solid brass or solid brass, chrome(d) finish. And Made in Germany.

I think the solid brass one is exclusive to Manufactum. https://www.manufactum.de/messograf-kugelschreiber-a37893/

(And it's one of the rare products they are cheaper on, than the source ...)

Highly recommended product!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 675
I‘ve seen the Cleo, but was held back by some comment of „less than expected quality“.

If I stumble upon one in person, I will take a closer look and see if I might be persuaded.

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1739
That pen is an interesting idea.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

It's peanutbutter jelly, never mind, epoxy time!  [big grin] Using Bodenversiegelung (Floor sealing/sealant) (epoxy) BLF in RAL 7032 "Pebble grey" von CDS Polymere. ( https://www.cds-polymere-shop.de/p/cds-versiegelung-blf-10-kg-haerter-s-standard-ral-7032-kieselgrau )

In this instance with standard hardener/curing agent S, which allows for about 45 minutes of processing time at 20°C. There is a speciality hardener/curing agent FH for quicker hardening/curing and/or lower temperatures, but that would also mean only 20 minutes of processing time at 20°C. With the standard hardener/curing agent and 20°C temperature you can walk on it after 18 hours. It's completely hard/cured after 7 days.

Hardener/curing agent S: minimum temperature 15°C; maximum temperature 35°C
Hardener/curing agent FH: minimum temperature 5°C; maximum temperature 25°C

Everything else is described in the products documentation: https://cds-polymere.de/produkte/versiegelungen-markierung/cds-versiegelung-blf/

As usual masking/taping and using the vacuum.





While taping/masking we'd almost made a mistake, since we - at first - had measured from the underside of the pedestal's board which is leveled/square. Since the floor is not, that would have resulted in 3 stripes of totally different heights around the feet of the pedestal. That would have looked totally off. Glad we caught that. (Explanation for the two stripes of masking tape around the feet of the pedestal)

Then the floor sealant/epoxy is mixed from base product (A) and hardener/curing agent (B).  Mix ratio 78 (A) / 22 (B).

CDS has an app for that, available on the App or GooglePlay Store. The app lets you chose the product, then you enter the amount needed and it shows you the needed amounts of base product and hardener/curing agent in kilograms, correct to two decimal places. Important notice: The mix ratio is only upheld when using kilograms, it can't be used with liters.

The floor sealant BLF is primer and finish in one product.

This is what the app looks like:



Using the stuff as primer you need 350g per square meter, using it as finish its 250g per square meter. We have round about 10 square meters, so it's 3.5 kg and 2.5 kg.

To be safe we mixed 4 kg of finished product to use as primer.

Once we started mixing I didn't take pictures anymore, as we only had 40 minutes to apply it.





That's it for today.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6307
  • Festool Baby.....
Nice work Oliver. That room is starting to come together nicely

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thank you very much! :)

Already planning the next steps for the basement.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline TwelvebyTwenty

  • Posts: 100
Looking good. What's next for the room - improved storage solutions/shelving?

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 675
I like the greenish tone! Feels friendly and Not basement-cold. :)
Nice work!

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks guys!

Well, after the 2nd coat/finish is applied, that room will be done. It already has a large shelf and a cabinet for storage. That's it.

Next part/ or better one of the next parts of the ongoing basement project will be to give this,

(Don't mind the cables, that was done by a so called "professional" "German master electrician" back in the day. (...)


which, when seen whole, looks like this,


(Heizkörper = radiator)

a more friendly, much lighter in color, all around better appearance.

But I'm not yet sure how to pull that off, especially since I do not want to tear it down completely and rebuild from scratch.

I have a brainstorming type thread going on, in a German woodworking forum.

If someone wants to contribute here, I'll be all ears.

My current idea is:

Remove all the thin, dark material, and replace with 5mm birch plywood. Use the same 5mm birch plywood to fill the dark doors. (Simply glue on top). Re-use the hardware. (Hence the 5mm limit) Remove frame and grate in front of radiator, re-use. Everything gets sanded and finished with a clear coat.

Some more details.

Thickness of all thin materials used.


Old hinges. (Actually screwed to the substructure, inside the cabinets)


Recessed filling of doors, hence the idea to simply glue in 5mm sheets of plywood.


Overall thickness of trim around doors.


Backside of door.



Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
That’s actually a very good idea Oliver.. to remove and replace thin material - as I understand isn’t hard to remove easily. To dress it up in new birch ply, you’ll have a lot of finishing choices.

Well, ahh - you may need to know that your “stuff” and your pictures of alike is sending us not so well contained hunting for ie: a pen with caliper capabilities.. We’re getting poorer, an mildly restless  [scared]
 [big grin] [big grin]

Suppose you have one of these as well...
The Perfect Pencil: I absolutely love all mine!
« Last Edit: June 27, 2020, 04:38 PM by FestitaMakool »
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Yeah, I have one of these, albeit the sterling silver model.

-> https://www.graf-von-faber-castell.de/produkte/PerfekterBleistift925erSterlingsilber/118566

Rarely use it away from my desk, I prefer my Yard-O-Led for project planning, sketching and project-journal entries. I even use it for marking in the shop when I think my Pica or regular pencils are to clumsy. Picture is a little older, by now the sterling silver parts have gained a nice patina. (The one in the front)



Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 1111
The laundry room is looking great Oliver, it has a Spanish look to it  [thumbs up]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks Jiggy! Finish coat will be applied today, and then its done. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
Yeah, I have one of these, albeit the sterling silver model.

-> https://www.graf-von-faber-castell.de/produkte/PerfekterBleistift925erSterlingsilber/118566

Rarely use it away from my desk, I prefer my Yard-O-Led for project planning, sketching and project-journal entries. I even use it for marking in the shop when I think my Pica or regular pencils are to clumsy. Picture is a little older, by now the sterling silver parts have gained a nice patina. (The one in the front)



Kind regards,
Oliver

- But of course you have.. [big grin] Love the way you spot and buy rare but very useful “tools”
One of mine is the older metal cap one (And a while back i bought a dosen of the green plastic ones - kept about 6 to put in various places and have given away 6 as gifts - very well received, as these are rare) They are really nice pencils for general use, and the sharpener are always at hand.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

The laundry room is finished now.

Since I now knew how it would be, I took the time to take a picture after weighing the components. As was the "primer", the finish coat was rolled on.









After 18hrs you can set a foot on it, and after a little over 24hrs, this is what it looked like - and we could start cleaning. I got a recommendation - outside our world - to use tesa® 4843 instead of my regular FrogTape. I can't recommend it, on quite a few, critical, but small, spots I removed the new paint and some plaster while pulling the tape off, and it also did not stopp the epoxy from getting under it where I used it on the edge of my floor tiles. Mechanically cleaning this up and finishing the cleaning by wiping the area with some thinner took longer than the process of applying the epoxy.









This is what it looks like now, finished & ready to go.





The future will tell how that epoxy is going to hold up.

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: June 30, 2020, 04:56 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 675
Hi Oliver,

It turned out really nice! Congrats!

...interesting on the tape issues.
It is really hard to find good tapes and even harder to keep in mind which model number actually worked for what, at least for me. ;)

I never used the frog tape, myself. I think I‘ll try and get some for the next project.

Can’t wait for the next step in your basement. :P

Uli

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6307
  • Festool Baby.....
Looking good Oliver, Now whats next?

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007
Hey Oliver

That looks great.  Did you use any additive to increase slip resistance? We used to add "skidtex" to Euclid epoxy products that were applied to garage floors. 

I love the look of epoxy paint on the floor. I wish I had the time in our current house to paint the garage floor before we moved in.

Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 53
Tape leaked and pulled paint off - sounds like best of both worlds, only possible product improvement would be if it also left an adhesive residue on your walls, that would be a trifecta.

(Nothing like having your project hijacked by something that shouldn’t be an issue....)

Been there, total pain and sorry.

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
Looks great! Nice clean and tidy - with a goose free hanging..?
In a couple of days you have forgot about that tape, you all are going to enjoy such nice facilities!
Masking tape, well ahh, do they ever not bleed the paint.. [sad]
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1736
"I love the look of epoxy paint on the floor. I wish I had the time in our current house to paint the garage floor before we moved in."

That's something I wish I had done too. Unfortunately the logistics of moving didn't allow for that.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1739
Best looking washing room I've seen in 45+ years  [smile]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Oliver,

It turned out really nice! Congrats!

...interesting on the tape issues.
It is really hard to find good tapes and even harder to keep in mind which model number actually worked for what, at least for me. ;)

I never used the frog tape, myself. I think I‘ll try and get some for the next project.

Can’t wait for the next step in your basement. :P

Uli

Hi Uli,

thank you very much! Out of all tapes I tried, the green FrogTape never let me down. I don't know why I listened to that tesa recommendation in first place, but it's already forgotten and the remainder of the tape trashed.

Next project will be that built-in cabinet shown in reply #818

Looking good Oliver, Now whats next?

Thank you very much, jobsworth! Next project, see reply #818 :)

Hey Oliver

That looks great.  Did you use any additive to increase slip resistance? We used to add "skidtex" to Euclid epoxy products that were applied to garage floors. 

I love the look of epoxy paint on the floor. I wish I had the time in our current house to paint the garage floor before we moved in.

Hi Rob,

thank you very much! We could have added either sand or "flakes" - we decided against it for two reasons: The epoxy was rolled on, and the floor itself was rather coarse. We thought that would offer enough slip resistance, and I tried with a bucket of water - we were right. If we had poured a thick layer, I would have wanted some of the colored flakes & sand in it!

You could still do it at some point, if you wanted?

Tape leaked and pulled paint off - sounds like best of both worlds, only possible product improvement would be if it also left an adhesive residue on your walls, that would be a trifecta.

(Nothing like having your project hijacked by something that shouldn’t be an issue....)

Been there, total pain and sorry.

Thank you very much Vtshopdog! Yeah, big disappointment in regards to that tape. It's cleaned up, I trashed the tape. All good now. :)

Looks great! Nice clean and tidy - with a goose free hanging..?
In a couple of days you have forgot about that tape, you all are going to enjoy such nice facilities!
Masking tape, well ahh, do they ever not bleed the paint.. [sad]

Thank you very much Stig! Yeah, The goose and a girl looking after them (actually gesturing to be quiet to them/ to stop cackling)  is part of our city's history. It dates back to 1695 and the reeve/advocate of the city back then, his seal had a girl gesturing to be quiet, and the latin phrase: „Nocet esse locutum“ which today could be interpreted as the formal version of "Don't kiss and tell" - meaning to keep quiet about business/judicial matters that the reeve/advocate was responsible for back in that time. The goose that has our city's name on it, was a goodie the city gave a way a long time ago. It's hanging there like forever, just funny.

Already forgot about the tape. It's trashed. :)

"I love the look of epoxy paint on the floor. I wish I had the time in our current house to paint the garage floor before we moved in."

That's something I wish I had done too. Unfortunately the logistics of moving didn't allow for that.

Maybe you could still do it at some point?

Best looking washing room I've seen in 45+ years  [smile]

Thank you very much Gregor!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007
Oliver,

I would love to paint the floor now, but I would have to get multiple portable storage things dropped in the driveway. Then I  would have to move a bunch of stuff, do the work, then move again [eek] . That all seemed more doable when getting paid to do it, but now it isn't as appealing.  [scared]

Your results are excellent, a real professional job.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
I hear you Rob!  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
And since we were talking about upcoming projects beside the basement earlier.

There is one thing on the "honey do list" that I've kept postponing for several years by now. My sweetie want's a wooden patio.

The issue with that is, that everything has to be transported over a small, dirt track that leads around all the houses, we're the last one connected to this "road". I've done it once with soil, by hand with a wheelbarrow to fill up a pool we demolished - NEVER again. Now I could put some board through the living room and entry hall, go through the house with the stuff - but thats getting old fast, as well - as it's not much difference in terms of the length of the way.

And demolishing the old patio, transporting & dumping the stuff, then transporting materials for the new patio ... All over that dirt track. That is not for me anymore.

So I always said, half jokingly, I'll do it when I get one of these small track dumpers:

https://www.wackerneuson.de/en/products/dumpers/track-dumpers/

A couple of weeks ago, we were going back and forth about it again, and she said, well, if you want, we could buy one of these.

At the same time an acquaintance was busy doing his patio remodel, which I didn't know. He posted about it, and I nearly couldn't believe my eyes when I read his post - he was using concrete anchors/concrete bolts to fix his substructure to his old tiled patio.

Now the problem is, I haven't build our current patio - I have no idea what really is underneath the the natural stone tiles. But I liked the idea enough to give it some more thoughts.

Main problem, though the patio is roofed and the soil underneath dry, it's still outdoors. So one should account for wood to be working/shrinking/expanding/moving depending on season/weather. That makes using really small gaps between the boards a problem. But it's the only way we would want it - if the gaps had to be larger, and you you could see the old patio underneath, it's not worth the time and effort for us.

Anyway, since I would have to find out if the old patio can cope with the concrete anchors/ concrete bolts (These are screw in, no injection/plug necessary) and a wooden substructure fixed to it - aka will it hold up? I need to make a test and evaluate.

So I contacted the screw/bolt manufacturer Heco about their anchors and asked for some samples. They were more than happy to send me some, these arrived today. (The same type my acquaintance used.) I got different types, ultimately I will only be needing the countersunk head ones, but they have these samples pre-packaged, so I got quite some more. Not exactly unhappy about it, it's always interesting and good to have some samples lying around.

The good news is, if this works on our old patio, installing a new one will be a breeze - maybe using some WPC (stabilized/ composite "wood" material) style product to be sure we get the "zero gap" without fears of wood working/shrinking/expanding/moving. Even though we would prefer real wood.

The bad news, I/we probably won't be getting a track dumpster. Which I would have loved to get. ( Probably more than the actual wooden patio  [tongue]  [big grin] )




Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
Great story about the goose [smile]

I’ve used similar bolts on porous concrete blocks, they hold really well and are easy and fun to work with (I used an impact driver). I’d guess it’s all down to the type you have.

The motorised wheel barrow - can’t you rent it?
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Of course one could rent a track dumper, but where's the fun in that? Besides, I'm seeing a lot more uses for it that just the patio project. That's why I would like to own one, now that we're staying here and the dirt track will always be there, six-point sockets do get older, too.  [tongue] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 579
 [big grin] [big grin] .. You said it!
Thinking.. that could be useful more than once. And you’ll always have your neighbours patios, in which you can rent yourself out as a part of the kit  [wink]
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Don't give me ideas, Stig ...  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International