Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 164599 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 190
@SRSemenza: agreed! It was 100% not meant as a statement of any sort. More that I understand what Oliver was saying and wish him all the best.

Edit: overlooked that I had not completed your name properly.

« Last Edit: June 14, 2020, 11:43 AM by hdv »

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline threesixright

  • Posts: 578
A European FOG get-together sounds like a great idea.  At the rate life is returning to pre-COVID normal here, we might be able to have one this year.
Missed this. Awesome!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks everyone! I guess when time comes, we make a thread solely for the purpose of getting a European GTG going & organized.

That's a great idea Oliver! I myself am in the same boat as you. I my case it is due to bad lungs (too much scar tissue in them, which inhibits my ability to properly breathe even when I am healthy). However, I must admit I am one of those who took it all too lightly at first and thought there was too much drama. Now I am taking it quite seriously.

I drive to Germany almost every month. As it happens I was in Germany yesterday to get our new adoption dog von Leben für Streuner. That was in Unna, near Dortmund.

Take good care of yourself and those around you. Your health is among the most important things you have.

When circumstances allow for it a European GTG would be wunderfull!
(Attachment Link)

Beautiful dog! And from Unna, fairly close. :)

Oliver, was the recent email the impetus behind popping a Corona today ?  [big grin]Hard to stop at just one, especially when they are frosty cold.  [tongue]

It was.  [big grin]

That Corona looks wonderful Oliver...especially ice cold. I haven't had one in a while...that's got me thinking.

Dinner this evening could very well be some very ice cold Corona + lime wedges with a Court Bouillon Shrimp Cocktail.  [smile]



Yes, please.  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
I've been listening a lot to the Apple Music Southern Craft playlist lately, and it served me with the ultimate spirit song for this thread & me. :)



Music starts at 1:03.


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7692
That Corona looks wonderful Oliver...especially ice cold. I haven't had one in a while...that's got me thinking.

Dinner this evening could very well be some very ice cold Corona + lime wedges with a Court Bouillon Shrimp Cocktail.  [smile]


Yes, please.  [big grin]

Well here ya go Oliver... [big grin]

The Court Bouillon adds such a nice soft flavor to the shrimp.  And the ice cold Corona was like dessert.  [wink]

1 lemon
2 carrots
2 celery stalks
Some fresh bay leaves
A head of garlic, halved
A medium Vidalia onion
Some fresh thyme
Some fresh cilantro

I like parsley better than cilantro but that's what was in the fridge.

Once up to a boil, the shrimp only need 1 1/2-2 minutes in the bouillon.

Served with a baby spinach/arugula salad with a simple vinaigrette.







Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
That looks fantastic @Cheese ! I now know what I will have cook & eat in the coming days! Thank you so much!

Do you let the bouillon sit for a little while before you cook the shrimp?

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7692

Do you let the bouillon sit for a little while before you cook the shrimp?


I'll bring the bouillon up to a gentle boil and keep her there for about 20-30. minutes. Then add the shrimp.

The bouillon is fun because you make it out of whatever herbs you have on hand. I've used thyme, tarragon, parsley cilantro, basil, rosemary and you could substitute some fennel bulb for the onion. I think I'll try the fennel bulb next time.  [smile]  Could substitute lime for lemon also.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Perfect! Thanks!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Picked up the paint for the boiler room door.




Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

After picking up the paint earlier today, I started working on the boiler room door.

Before I started to remove the door, I watched a couple of Youtube videos on this topic, as these doors typically have a self-closing mechanism that is spring powered/ spring loaded. They all claim you need a 4mm hex key, with this door, of course its a 5mm hex key. ...

Furthermore, the spring loaded hinge is on the bottom of my door, in the videos I watched it was always the upper hinge.

I had no idea what would happen, so I recommend steel toe boots and safety glasses!

The upper hinge can be hammered out downwards (2), once you get the end of a crowbar into the slot (1) in


The lower hinge without cover.


The lower hinge has to be unlocked and hold in this position, as the picture shows by turning left. Then you can hammer out the hinge upwards. As I know now, nothing will go off flying. But you definitely can't turn the hex key by hand. A T-Handle-Hex-key would flex and ultimately twist, so I grabbed the small shank/leg with vise grips, and inserted the long leg/shank into the bolt. This allows you to turn/unlock the hinge in a very controlled manner - but with the necessary force.


Hinges/bolts removed.




Hinges on door frame.




The door has quite some weight but at the same time has a pretty secure stance inside the hinges - even without bolts - so I hope I will be able to put it back together without too much hassle.

Fast forward I had the door on my supports and was ready to sand it down. The usual setup needs no introduction I guess. ;)




At some point I reached the spot I had filled.




Did I say before, that I absolutely love working on the patio?


Sanding hinges by hand.




And some point, both sides and all the edges are sanded down - finished.




Then first I used a tack cloth, and after that cellulose thinner and another cloth, after that another cloth to finish.


Applying first layer of primer.


End of the day. One side, one coat of primer.


More tomorrow. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 684
Obviously that hinge was originally installed upside down — there is an arrow pointing the right way on it… (Considering arrows always point up.)


BTW: You gave me a nice tip — lining with foil beats using those plastic inserts. Gonna use that tomorrow on a little touch up I need to do.
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + TSB1-MW 1000 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · OF2200 · CMS-GE · Vecturo 18 Li · TID 18 · TKS 80 EBS-Set · … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 · Hammer HS950 | TaigaTools VacPods Pro Set
Wishlist: ETS EC 125 w 150 pad, DTS

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Bert, thank you! That didn't even catch my eye. But now that you point me towards it, yes, obviously that door frame was placed upside down. Probably because they had a wrong one ordered. I checked the plans, and the door opens correctly to the left as planned, but they obviously ordered one that opens to the right. And then they just put it all in, upside down.

That also explains, why all the spring loaded hinges I have seen, where always on the upper part.

Using the foil is not bad, but I still manage to get a hole in it every now and then ... ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6709
That cleans up just fine, Oliver. Was wondering about the foil too, I think I would poke through that in a matter of minutes. 

Als amazed to see how the mesh papers for your DTS are totall destroyed. Or maybe not so amazed. I don't see the appeal for these mesh papers, I'm sticking with the good ol' fashioned 7 hole papers.

Nice proof that the DTS can also do rough paint removal with the right grit on it, though I would have used the Rotex and be done in a quarter of the time.

A small tip about using that nitro-verdunner to clean your surface, most of these engineered "ersatz" thinners leave a tiny film of residue on the surface that can mess with your paint's adhesion. Leaving those streaks you can see in the picture is never a good sign. Only use cleaners that you are sure of that will evaporate 100%.

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007
Hey Oliver

Nice project, and I must say you have a great back yard.

Are you going to sand and paint the door jambs, as well?

I experimented with those mesh sanding discs about a year ago.  The brand was Diablo.  I was sanding metal and they seemed to work OK.  I should emphasize the "OK" as just OK, not like using Granat or one of those top quality abrasives.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2020, 03:09 AM by Rob Z »

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
That cleans up just fine, Oliver. Was wondering about the foil too, I think I would poke through that in a matter of minutes. 

Als amazed to see how the mesh papers for your DTS are totall destroyed. Or maybe not so amazed. I don't see the appeal for these mesh papers, I'm sticking with the good ol' fashioned 7 hole papers.

Nice proof that the DTS can also do rough paint removal with the right grit on it, though I would have used the Rotex and be done in a quarter of the time.

A small tip about using that nitro-verdunner to clean your surface, most of these engineered "ersatz" thinners leave a tiny film of residue on the surface that can mess with your paint's adhesion. Leaving those streaks you can see in the picture is never a good sign. Only use cleaners that you are sure of that will evaporate 100%.

Thanks Alex!

In regards to the mesh paper, personally I do like them, as I can attest to even better dust extraction when using them. However, they have weak points:

1) They will tear faster than regular paper when sanding over edges and into corners.
2) They will tear faster than regular paper when you hit "sprinkles" from welding, like I did on this door. (That's where the holes in the used mesh come from)
3) They will clog faster than regular paper when used on anything thing else then absolute, 100% dry stuff. This is something I heavily noticed on the patio's roofing substructure and the sheds, as soon as you hit a spot that is withered, the mesh clogs. And when doing the staircase, in those areas touched the most, the mesh clogged equally easy & fast.

That's why I always have regular paper, too. And I will use it later when I sand the door frame.

Definitely yes on the Rotex.

And thank you very much for that tip on the Nitro-Verdünner! I was recommended NovaThin from CWS to go with the CWS Allgrund primer and CWS Satiné paint. I now understand why I should have spent that 20 - 30 extra Euros for the NovaThin. I really didn't fathom it would make a difference.

The good thing is, I did "polish" over it with another cloth and there will be two layers of primer - so I hope for the best. :)

We'll see about the results. :)

Again, thanks for the advice - highly appreciated!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hey Oliver

Nice project, and I must say you have a great back yard.

Are you going to sand and paint the door jambs, as well?

I experimented with those mesh sanding discs about a year ago.  The brand was Diablo.  I was sanding metal and they seemed to work OK.  I should emphasize the "OK" as just OK, not like using Granat or one of those top quality abrasives.

Hi!

Thank you Rob! Yes, the jambs/ door frame are getting sanded and painted as well. :)

As you can see the GranatNet mesh abrasives can only be "OK" as well. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6709
In regards to the mesh paper, personally I do like them, as I can attest to even better dust extraction when using them.

That's physically impossible, the pad of the sander still has only 7 holes. In fact, the mesh goes over the holes, partially blocking them.

And thank you very much for that tip on the Nitro-Verdünner! I was recommended NovaThin from CWS to go with the CWS Allgrund primer and CWS Satiné paint. I now understand why I should have spent that 20 - 30 extra Euros for the NovaThin.

No, you should not. All those engineered ersatz thinners and cleaners are a complete waste of money and less environmentally friendly.

An ammonia solution is best, I buy a liter for 70 cents and it can make more than 100 buckets filled with 5 liters of water.

It would be wrong to think ammonia is bad, your own body produces it. It only becomes bad when it's too concentrated, always dissolve just a few ml in a bucket full of water.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7692
A small tip about using that nitro-verdunner to clean your surface, most of these engineered "ersatz" thinners leave a tiny film of residue on the surface that can mess with your paint's adhesion. Leaving those streaks you can see in the picture is never a good sign. Only use cleaners that you are sure of that will evaporate 100%.

Ya I've tried all of them and they all leave a haze/residue on metal or glass. I'll always use an ammoniated window cleaner for the final step before priming like Windex.


 

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007
Cheese

What is your opinion about cleaning metal with isopropyl alcohol? Many years ago I had a job to install tile on Bilco Hatches, using epoxy.  The instructions from both Bilco and the epoxy mfr said to mechanically scuff the surface and then do all final cleaning with the alcohol.  It must not have been an issue because I never heard anything afterwards.


Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007


Hey Oliver

I haven't kept up with all the Festool options the past few years. I see based on your comment that FT has the mesh abrasives now. I'll have to give it a try because the Festool quality is likely better than the one I used.

Hi!

Thank you Rob! Yes, the jambs/ door frame are getting sanded and painted as well. :)

As you can see the GranatNet mesh abrasives can only be "OK" as well. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
[/quote]

Online Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4873
Rob Z, alcohol is good but extremely expensive compared to diluted ammonia.

Cheese, what is “ocean bound plastic”?

Oliver, what is the waterproof membrane over your patio?

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
In regards to the mesh paper, personally I do like them, as I can attest to even better dust extraction when using them.

That's physically impossible, the pad of the sander still has only 7 holes. In fact, the mesh goes over the holes, partially blocking them.

And thank you very much for that tip on the Nitro-Verdünner! I was recommended NovaThin from CWS to go with the CWS Allgrund primer and CWS Satiné paint. I now understand why I should have spent that 20 - 30 extra Euros for the NovaThin.

No, you should not. All those engineered ersatz thinners and cleaners are a complete waste of money and less environmentally friendly.

An ammonia solution is best, I buy a liter for 70 cents and it can make more than 100 buckets filled with 5 liters of water.

It would be wrong to think ammonia is bad, your own body produces it. It only becomes bad when it's too concentrated, always dissolve just a few ml in a bucket full of water.

Re: GranatNet mesh abrasives. I understand what you say, I'm not going to argue about it - I know the results I had and will continue to have with it, I'm happy with it. But I understand that experience varies, you are a pro, I'm a hobbyist - and if you like the paper better - thats perfectly fine and plausible with me! :)

Re: Ammonia. Could you please elaborate a little bit more on what you do with it once you have the 5 liters of ammonia-solution? (I mean, obviously I have used window/glass cleaner like @Cheese posted) Is it only for surface cleaning before using primer, or do you use it as an all-around cleaner for tools, hands, (...)? I would have never thought of using such a cleaner before using primer. But then I also thought that stuff like the ersatz thinners would evaporate completely. Learn something new everyday, which is great!

Thank you very much!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer


Hey Oliver

I haven't kept up with all the Festool options the past few years. I see based on your comment that FT has the mesh abrasives now. I'll have to give it a try because the Festool quality is likely better than the one I used.

Quote
Hi!

Thank you Rob! Yes, the jambs/ door frame are getting sanded and painted as well. :)

As you can see the GranatNet mesh abrasives can only be "OK" as well. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Hi Rob,

well, as you can read here, experience varies with the GranatNet mesh abrasives, I like them. Maybe try them in small quantities and see if it is for you - or not. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
(...)
Oliver, what is the waterproof membrane over your patio?

Hi Michael,

on the side, that is a PVC foil I got locally and installed a couple of years ago. The best one to date, I bought it off the roll at our equivalent of HomeDepot. No real source, sorry.


If we're taking about the roofing, that is Makrolon polycarbonate. -> https://www.vv-kunststoffe.de/stegplatten-wellplatten/lieferprogramm/stegplatten/

It's a system that works with aluminum profiles (right version in the top pictures is what we have.) : https://www.vv-kunststoffe.de/stegplatten-wellplatten/lieferprogramm/aluminium-verlegeprodukte/


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7692
Cheese
What is your opinion about cleaning metal with isopropyl alcohol? Many years ago I had a job to install tile on Bilco Hatches, using epoxy.  The instructions from both Bilco and the epoxy mfr said to mechanically scuff the surface and then do all final cleaning with the alcohol.  It must not have been an issue because I never heard anything afterwards.

Rob, I think IPA isopropyl alcohol may be ok. I say that because I use it as a lubricant when I'm machining aluminum so I'm very familiar with the product and the way it dries.

I've tried all the normal, usual solvents including acetone and naphtha, which really surprised me when they both left behind some residual artifacts. I've never tried IPA because I stumbled upon Windex and had success with that so that's what I stuck with. 

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007
Hey Michael

I never thought about the cost.  The epoxy setting materials and the epoxy grout were so expensive  [eek] that the cost of a pint of alcohol wasn't an issue.  I never considered ammonia to be something to use to clean metal. I do need to cut and paint some metal soon so this is good info to have now.


Rob Z, alcohol is good but extremely expensive compared to diluted ammonia.


Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007
Hey Cheese

This is interesting...I always had been told that acetone was the thing to use because it evaporated fully. I hate the smell of ammonia but it is certainly not as nasty as acetone  [crying] .

We also used to use MEK for certain jobs and I really hated that stuff. I wonder if that has been regulated off the market.


Cheese
What is your opinion about cleaning metal with isopropyl alcohol? Many years ago I had a job to install tile on Bilco Hatches, using epoxy.  The instructions from both Bilco and the epoxy mfr said to mechanically scuff the surface and then do all final cleaning with the alcohol.  It must not have been an issue because I never heard anything afterwards.

Rob, I think IPA isopropyl alcohol may be ok. I say that because I use it as a lubricant when I'm machining aluminum so I'm very familiar with the product and the way it dries.

I've tried all the normal, usual solvents including acetone and naphtha, which really surprised me when they both left behind some residual artifacts. I've never tried IPA because I stumbled upon Windex and had success with that so that's what I stuck with.

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 1007
Oliver, 

I will check it out and see if they're available in small quantities.  One thing that for me is a problem is some abrasives are sold in 50 packs, which is waaaaay more than I will ever need. 


This is yet again another reason to note  how great Tom Bellemare was to have as a dealer because he would always sell smaller amounts to me or make up a custom box of abrasives. 


[/quote]

Hi Rob,

well, as you can read here, experience varies with the GranatNet mesh abrasives, I like them. Maybe try them in small quantities and see if it is for you - or not. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
[/quote]

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1973
@Rob Z, if you need DTS sheets send me a PM and I can send you some samples of granat net (80/120/180).  I bought the lifetime supply in the 50 ct boxes.  Although, if you're Oliver, that lifetime supply will only make it to Sunday.  [tongue]
-Raj

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1462
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

I started today with applying a second coat of primer.


While that dried, I started working on the door frame. Originally I had planned to use the DTS with Brilliant II paper, but since the frame consists of just small faces/edges & corners - I decided to go another route. Wanted to try this like forever anyway. I used a hot air blower and a scraper.


That worked great, but it seems chrome doesn't exactly like heat. Snap-On uses chrome on/ chrome plates many tools, and the blade of this striking scraper was chrome plated as well. Got some color. ;)








About time to turn the door, and apply the first layer of primer on the other side.


Later on, the second layer.


Then I opened up the spa for my DTS. It sanded way more than I ever thought I would sand when I bought it, and during the first time using it, I already scuffed the footplate/sanding plate. I ordered a new one early on, but never installed it, because every new project had edges & corners to sand - and I new it would be scuffed again in no time. Given all the contamination with metal and potential cross contamination I decided now was the right time to swap the foot/sanding plate. I don't see more "metal working" in my/ or the DTS's future - so it made sense. The door frame hat some pretty ugly rust to it as well.






Primer applied to doorframe.


Billing. ;) I considered the interface pad contaminated as well and trashed it. It had ended any feasible service life anyway.






Then, finally, the first layer of paint. CWS Satiné RAL 7035 Lichtgrau. Roll: Friess Flockwalze Magic Finish








Of course also painted the door frame.


Thats it for today. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International