Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 148177 times)

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Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks Gregor!

I just used 3 fingers, more or less  [scared] [eek] [blink]  [big grin] [wink]

But yeah, I will see if I can adjust the pressure/force used a bit next time.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

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Offline threesixright

  • Posts: 515
Looks amazing Oliver!

Thanks for sharing!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

We got some catching up to do, on a little something from way past.  [big grin]

I had this situation:

[blink] [eek] [scared]



 [eek] [eek] [eek]  [sad] [crying] [mad]



There's always something to do ...  [smile] [big grin] [wink]

Kind regards,
Oliver

And I rectified it.

Yeah, I've heard that before @leakyroof  [big grin]

--

So, a new plug was easily installed.





--

(...)

Kind regards,
Oliver

So a couple of days ago I inspected that socket/plug again and guess what, the rubber had worn and didn't offer any ingress protection anymore.






So I decided to get something more rugged/protected. IP54 ingress protected and Made in Germany. -> https://www.abl.de/global/downloads/kataloge/ABL_SCHUKOprofessional_folder_EN.pdf They claim it's the only IP54 ingress protected Schuko-Connector/Plug available. I haven't fact checked that. It even comes with a LED to let you know it's live (or not).

First delivery from Bauhaus was a miss.



Then, finally, they delivered a complete unit.







This is actually pretty nifty, the connector/terminal is held inside the case/housing by a single screw, that only needs to be slightly turned.

Screw retracted, connector/terminal can be removed



Screw protruding, connector/terminal is locked.



Also a great idea:

Cap unscrewed, sealing/flexible part of the cable sleeve (gland) inside case/housing is open.



Cap tightened down, sealing/flexible part of the cable sleeve (gland) inside case/housing is closed/sealed against the cable.

It looks a little like what we call a "Panzerverschraubung" or "Kabelverschraubung" in German -> gland or cable screw in English, as far as I know. But due to the flexible sealing and screw mechanism it's way more sophisticated.



And installed.



Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: May 28, 2020, 06:28 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 487
I had (have..) one just like the one receptor you show here wrecked.
It’s poor quality, seeing yours just confirms it - mine started to rust early, and then the heat..

Most shops still sell them, I steer away and buy more costly - it one of those: - no, I want the expensive one  [big grin]

Edit: While I’m at it, be aware of Craftomat Forstner bit. I returned 2 bits with terrible runout.
My very cheap (think the whole set of 5 cost less than one Craftomat) Lidl‘s Powerfix was exemplary compared to Craftomat. So there are exceptions  [wink]
« Last Edit: May 28, 2020, 06:37 PM by FestitaMakool »
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Here's a minor/small sign of life from the "basement project".

Tomorrow will be the day for starting either on the new pedestal for washing machine and dryer or the two-component flooring in the laundry room. So this old doorframe had to go, as there will be a couple of bricks added (only 1 brick in height of course) to form a new water edge in case of another flooding.

Best tool for the job? Wera's "screwdriver chisel". Clean the head of the screw from paint, drive it in with a few strokes of a hammer and turn.







What I didn't really expect was the type of anchors used. These have a little, flat, tail that sticks out on the other side of the wall. Thats why I wasn't able to loosen them with a hammer and then turn-and-pull them with vise grips. This is also a lesson learned for the other frames, I had no idea what these little tails were good for, before I removed the frame.  [big grin] (Of course I did try to bend them back into a more straight shape and drive them through with a hammer, when I understood how they work. But that didn't work, either.)



What was left to do was to cut the anchors flush. I used the Spyder Products MultiCutter (3x3) blades 10TPI on one, 14 TPI on the other side. ( https://www.spyderproducts.com/tools/3x3-blades/ ) They are made in Germany by MPS Saegen: https://www.mps-saegen.de/en/  // https://www.mps-saegen.de/en/innovation-multicutter-saebelsaegeblaetter/   And these are really great! Demolition work without having to change the blade every 5 minutes ... As I already pointed out, they are double edged, in this case 10 TPI on one, 14 TPI on the other side. And they can be used for easy plunge cuts. 14 TPI was a perfect fit, thats why I'm holding the saw upside down. Inside the Snap-On cover works a tried-and-true Metabo 12V reciprocating saw, including the fantastic quick-release, multi chuck that can hold reciprocating saw blades as well as T-shaft jigsaw blades.











Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: June 03, 2020, 05:34 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2825
Would not have thought that Snap-on would have a reciprocating saw.  I guess that is in their bodywork line?

Double sided blades is a great idea.  Definitely can see the benefit and will try to find them here in the states.

So those are essentially threaded inserts with a flat lip on the back side that then have a flat head screw that goes into them.  I've seen them for knock-down furniture, but never for larger construction.  I guess you could not easily have driven them back through the wall?

Thanks for sharing more tool inspiration!  and house progress!

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Neil,

Snap-On has a very neat selection of 14.4V and 18V cordless tools. And sometimes, when you know who the manufacturer behind certain models is, it makes sense to buy them and stick to the batteries. https://shop.snapon.com/product/14.4-V-MicroLithium-Saws/14.4-V-MicroLithium-Cordless-Reciprocating-Saw-(Tool-Only)/CTRS761ADB

As I said, it's basically a Metabo: https://www.metabo.com/de/de/maschinen/saegen/saebelsaegen/powermaxx-ase-602264750-akku-saebelsaege.html

And it will be interesting to see, if they are going to upgrade to the newer, brushless, variant: https://www.metabo.com/de/de/maschinen/saegen/saebelsaegen/powermaxx-sse-12-bl-602322500-akku-saebelsaege.html

And the Metabo/Snap-On is so interesting because of the "multi chuck" that accepts reciprocating saw blades and T-shaft jigsaw blades.











You shouldn't have any trouble finding the Spyder products 3x3 multi cutter reciprocating saw blades, as Spyder products is the US re-seller. http://spyderproducts.com They sell a lot of the high-quality MPS sawing products.



Here are some pictures that speak for themselves. The big brown chunk of wood in the last pictures is incredibly dry and hard Bongossi/Azobee. The saw blade I used yesterday, was exactly the one that I had used for testing and evaluation here. And I think that speaks for both, the 14.4V cordless reciprocating saw, and the 3x3 multi cutter saw blades.


















Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online Rob Z

  • Posts: 989
Hello Oliver

I would have liked to have those blades back in the days I was doing remodel and demo work. The best blades I ever found for demo were made by Hilti and had a profile like lumberjack cross-cut saw.  Man those things could chew through wood and other materials.

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Rob,

I guess you are talking about one of the "meanest" reciprocating saw blades available.  [scared] [eek] The S 1531 L type, right?  [big grin] [wink]

https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-2608650676-Sabre-Blade-Piece/dp/B0009W868C

Unbelievable cutting capabilities, for sure! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online Rob Z

  • Posts: 989
Hello Oliver

That looks similar, although I could swear the Hilti brand looked even scarier  [eek] [scared] .  I wonder if I still have any in the shop... will have to take a look.

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Curious to see that blade then if you have one left. It's incredible what is "out there" and available if you know it. Makes life so much easier. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

A couple of pictures from today.

The feet for the new pedestal (washing machine and dryer) were built/laid, the old one component plastic coating/paint was removed from the concrete floor. Primer was applied, some superficial cracks were covered with some "webbing" type stuff - those will be filled tomorrow. Additionally the pedestal will be finished, maybe the tiles will also be applied. Next week the new two component epoxy flooring will be done.












Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online Rob Z

  • Posts: 989
Oliver, it looks like you're building a commercial laundry facility!  [big grin]

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
There is actually a story behind this:

Back in the day we had a large Bauknecht washing machine that was basically marketed as "US"-modell because it was one of the very few models that could handle 8kg of laundry back then. This was important to us for washing cushions and similar stuff. That machine came with a pedestal and we learned to love that. Fast forward that machine died at some point and suddenly the 8kg was nothing special anymore. So we bought another machine, and a new pedestal. On a Monday afternoon in March, we had just learned about possible Covid-19 restrictions, that machine died. So we rushed to a store, bought a machine, set delivery for Wednesday because we didn't want to ride out, whatever was coming at us, without a washing machine. The machine got delivered that Wednesday, and the delivery guys told us: last delivery, indefinitely. Later that day, I wanted to put it on the pedestal. Of course, it didn't fit. We now had the old Bauknecht pedestal, the pedestal from the current machine that died two days earlier, and our dryer, sitting on his own pedestal. All of them feature a drawer that is very practical. First reaction was to try and order another pedestal. I cringed when I saw the 250,- Euro price tag, for yet a fourth pedestal. I held off ordering it because I couldn't add it to my basket. That was good, because I then called the manufacturer and they told me it wouldn't fit our new machine, anyway. ...

I said enough. Now we have this pedestal build, the machines go on top, and two of the old pedestals, because of the drawers, go inside those bays you can already see. So no matter what new machine we will get in future - it will just sit on top. And since that is & will be perfectly leveled, no more fumbling with those pesky adjustable washing machine and dryer feet thingies. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online Rob Z

  • Posts: 989
Oliver, I will be interested to see your LR project when it's finished.

I don't find any of those blades in the shop and I can't find them at Hilti's website.  Maybe they are discontinued?  I think I first bought them about 12-13 years ago.

These are similar to what the Hilti blades were like and I'm reminded now that they are classified as 'pruning' blades.

https://www.gmesupply.com/milwaukee-5-tpi-pruning-sawzall-blade-5-pack?gclid=CjwKCAjwt-L2BRA_EiwAacX32RNLkzDZIzfCPnD8_i-9f6bp30JpT7F8iWTVIHCtB4o2u5TEL14qbBoCB4YQAvD_BwE


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7368
Hey Rob, Milwaukee sells those blades as Sawzall pruning blades in a couple of different lengths. They’re painted a dark green for quick identification.

Online Rob Z

  • Posts: 989
Hi Cheese

Yes, that's what is in the link I posted.

Those things could tear thru studs and floor joists !


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7368
FWIW...the first time I saw one of these blades was about 30 years ago. It was sold under the Skil product banner and it was known as the "The Ugly Blade".

Then they disappeared for about 5+ years until Milwaukee introduced them again. Milwaukee marketed them as a solution for cutting "green wood", thus the color of the blade.

They are fantastic for pruning purposes, however, the longer variants do tend to bend easily because of their form factor. Because of this I've never used one for demo purposes and have used the thicker/wider/stiffer Milwaukee AX series blades instead for demo.


Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1705
Enough blade porn for my taste.

But, in a futile attempt to have the last word: you might want to watch



and reconsider  [big grin]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7368
Enough blade porn for my taste.

But, in a futile attempt to have the last word: you might want to watch and reconsider.  [big grin]

The cutting of the 2" solid round stock with a Sawzall at the 7:30 mark is pretty impressive.  [smile]

And Oliver, I love the cow and the calf...kind of the farm version of the pink flamingo's.  [tongue]

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Today's progress. Applying cement lime plaster/cement calcareous plaster. Then the necessary plywood was dropped off. 40mm thickness. 2500x1250 mm (one sheet) had to be bought. Quality: BB/CP, we had it cut pre delivery. Then the cement lime plaster had to be "rubbed" - Can someone tell me the correct english term for when you use a wet sponge to smoothen the plaster surface.

A cut out was made so the drain pipe would fit through and the drain pipe was installed. Brackets were installed.

The plywood board was mounted to the "legs" and additionally secured to the wall via the brackets I mentioned above. One component polyurethane adhesive (Würth Bond & Seal via 300ml cartrdige)  screws & wall plugs were used for this.

PCI Wadian was used as primer on the plywood. After a short drying period, tiling started. To make tiling the front-end/ face side as painless as possible, some scraps were screwed to the board from the underside. So the tiles can rest on spacers put in between.

The floor was then "plastered" with PCI Repafix.


Applying cement lime plaster.


"Wateredge"


40mm plywood "scraps" (BB side)


CP side


Stamp


Installing drain pipe, brackets and rubbing the cement lime plaster.


"Wateredge" cement lime plaster rubbed.


Plywood board installed.


Primer applied to plywood board.


Tiling, upper side.




Scraps installed to help with tiling face side.


Tiles on face side.




"Plastering" the floor with PCI Repafix.


End of day two.





Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Scott in Bend

  • Posts: 260
Hi!

Then the cement lime plaster had to be "rubbed" - Can someone tell me the correct english term for when you use a wet sponge to smoothen the plaster surface.


Kind regards,
Oliver


I call it "wet sanding" anytime a damp sponge is used on plaster or drywall compound.

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thank you very much Scott!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online Rob Z

  • Posts: 989
Oliver

40 mm plywood is 1.57"  [eek] no wonder you don't want to handle a full sheet. I've seen 1 1/8" plywood (~28mm) and that is plenty beefy.

Minor variation from Scott's version: the brickies here would call that "sponging".  Not very imaginative, is it?  [big grin]

Cool project.

Offline xedos

  • Posts: 334
Looks awesome.

I believe the correct industry term in the States is called "floating".

The tool is called a sponge float. Traditionally they are made of rubber, but poly ones are starting to appear now.

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks everyone!

So today was a rather short day.

The pedestal/tiles was/were grouted today and the floor got it's last thin layer of Repafix, wich is the last mineral containing layer before the epoxy will be applied, hopefully at some point next week.









I ordered and paid for the epoxy on Thursday, but the manufacturer will only start making my, currently out of stock, 10kg set once they have my payment allocated in/to their books. ... So hopefully the stuff will be delivered next week. Funny thing is they'd rather trust a global company, that's not even a bank, and that almost always sides with the buyer in case of trouble/problems than a gentleman. My "loss" not using that global company as payment processor, I guess.  [tongue] [wink] [cool]

As you might be able to see, the tiles for the pedestal are the same we used for some of the basement flooring. The flooring of the laundry room will be RAL 7032 "pebble grey" colored - that should make for a nice contrast and together with the now complete "wateredge" should give it a look that reminds of a bin/basin.

Tomorrow I will be painting the walls, give the pedestal it's final cleaning and put the machines on it.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7368
The tile & grouting looks good Oliver....[big grin]..was the floor epoxy a custom color or did they just not have enough on hand to fill your order?  If it was a standard color it's odd that they just wouldn't go ahead and manufacture some more automatically without running you through the money changer scenario?

Question...how does this work? Does this piping have o'rings inside so that you can easily reposition fittings?

Tee facing forwards




Tee turned left 90º



That 40 mm plywood is awesome. Very  [cool]

Online jobsworth

  • Posts: 6191
  • Festool Baby.....
Very nice work Oliver. You seem to get a lot done.

You definately motivate me to get busy. Ive been messing around with some laundry room cabinets that I havent finished yet could be done an me on to the next project by now.

 My wife would love you.  [big grin]

 You must have quite a tool budget  [tongue]

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Cheese,

Thanks!

yes, the piping has o-rings inside. It's "plug and play" in the truest meaning. Since there is no pressure, just draining washing machine and dryer, there is no problem. It's called "HT Rohr" in German. (high temperature piping) -> https://www.stabilo-sanitaer.de/wasser-installation/abwasserrohre-abflussrohre/ht-pp-rohre-kunststoffrohre/

Sadly it's Wikipedia site is not translated. -> https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hochtemperaturrohr

It's only to be used inside buildings. Not outside or buried in soil. For such use, there is "KG-Rohr" Which stands for "Kanalgrundrohr" in english it would translate to "basic sewage piping". But only to connect your building to the utilities real sewer. -> https://www.stabilo-sanitaer.de/wasser-installation/abwasserrohre-abflussrohre/kg-rohre-kanalrohre/

Sadly it's Wikipedia site is not translated. -> https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanalgrundrohr

The color is standard, and they have plenty of the stuff. Currently just not "packaged" as 10kg set. You receive two buckets: One with the resin, one with the hardener/curing agent. Both together account for 10kg of flooring material. The idea is, you don't have to mess around with weighing/measuring for exactly upholding the 78:22 ratio. You basically just dump the small bucket into the larger bucket and make sure it's completely emptied. (We still will "mess" with it, because we need 3.5kg for the first/primer layer, and 2.5kg for the finishing layer over two days) I especially bought a scale for this, and they have a very cool app, I will show on this thread when I post about the flooring. :) )

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: June 06, 2020, 10:01 AM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1297
  • formerly @the_black_tie_diyer
Very nice work Oliver. You seem to get a lot done.

You definately motivate me to get busy. Ive been messing around with some laundry room cabinets that I havent finished yet could be done an me on to the next project by now.

 My wife would love you.  [big grin]

 You must have quite a tool budget  [tongue]

Thanks!

I'm trying to stay as positive as I can, especially here on the FOG. But because of my overall health situation, which by now is more or less unproblematic as long as it is treated/medicated, we had to re-think our plans for the future. And now that it is clear that we will stay, we can spend whatever we want to spend on all this stuff and further improve this fantastic home for us, without thinking about what was once our and to some extent also largely my plan(s) for the future.

One door closes, another one opens. Life happens.  [smile]

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: June 06, 2020, 12:06 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International