Author Topic: Marking knives for joinery  (Read 1001 times)

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Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 505
    • In The Woodshop
Marking knives for joinery
« on: May 23, 2020, 09:30 AM »
As distinct from the thread on utility knives, these are some the knives I have collected over the years and use for laying out joinery. Obviously not all at the same time :)

Three popular knives - these ones get a lot of use. From the top down ... Swann-Morton fixed blade, Stanley swivel blade, and a Swann-Morton craft knife which was my grandfather's. This one is about 60 years old (except for the screw). They all use disposable blades (which are easy to resharpen, which I do) ...



These ones are a little more up market. All made by Chris Vesper. The top two are heavy duty knives, one in Tasmanian Blackwood and the other in 10000 year-old Black Red Gum. The lower two are dovetail knives, designed (by myself) for marking dovetails. The lower one has an extra thin blade for the slimmest dovetails. These knives are the ones I tend to use when dovetailing ...



The last three here are Japanese kiridashi. The top is one I handled. The middle one is the one I prefer and use mostly. The lower one is used for reaching into small areas. The advantage of the unhandled kiridashi is that they can more easily register on the backs of the blades ...



Regards from Perth

Derek

Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on joinery, hand tools, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

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Offline Chris Wong

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Re: Marking knives for joinery
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2020, 01:49 AM »
Hi Derek,

For fine work, the marking knife you made for me is still my go-to knife. For big work requiring a longer blade, I ground a spear point on the end of an old socket chisel missing a handle.
Chris Wong, http://FlairWoodworks.com
First Festool was a free pencil.
Shipping live-edge cribbage boards around the world since 2010.

Online Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 1253
Re: Marking knives for joinery
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2020, 09:00 AM »
I really like that handle you made on the Japanese knife. You don't happen to have a left hander  [wink]
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 11:22 AM by Mario Turcot »
Mario

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 505
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Marking knives for joinery
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2020, 10:47 AM »
Hi Derek,

For fine work, the marking knife you made for me is still my go-to knife. For big work requiring a longer blade, I ground a spear point on the end of an old socket chisel missing a handle.

Good grief, Chris! That must have been about 15 years ago!

I dearly love the video you made about the Magic Square, and share it with others at any opportunity :)

Regards from Perth

Derek
Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on joinery, hand tools, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 950
Re: Marking knives for joinery
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2020, 01:30 PM »
Hi Derek,

For fine work, the marking knife you made for me is still my go-to knife. For big work requiring a longer blade, I ground a spear point on the end of an old socket chisel missing a handle.

Good grief, Chris! That must have been about 15 years ago!
...


And he's just getting started with it, I bet.



I've got a kiridashi style marking knife that my son made for me about 15 years ago.  It's my go-to joinery knife.


I use and abuse utility knives, of course.  I've also found that a Swiss Army Classic is amazingly useful.  The blade is strong, easy to sharpen, and relatively thin.  It's just too short for some jobs.


Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3246
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Marking knives for joinery
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2020, 12:53 PM »
True confession.....

I have some beautiful marking knives including one from Blue Spruce. The confession is that I prefer pulling out my Benchmade pocket knife. I keep it super sharp. It has a very short blade, flips open with a push of a button, and has a good heft in the hand. The steel keeps an edge forever.
Birdhunter

Offline ProCarpenterRVA

  • Posts: 133
Re: Marking knives for joinery
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2020, 07:18 AM »
True confession.....

I have some beautiful marking knives including one from Blue Spruce. The confession is that I prefer pulling out my Benchmade pocket knife. I keep it super sharp. It has a very short blade, flips open with a push of a button, and has a good heft in the hand. The steel keeps an edge forever.
Haha yeah I've been doing the same thing! I've got a benchmade bugout that I wove a paracord "handle" for. It is a sharp knife and it weighs about 2.5 ounces ! I think you can get one on Amazon for 100 bucks. Doubles as a wonderful cheese knife for your lunch

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