Author Topic: Manual Measuring Tools  (Read 1401 times)

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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3234
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Manual Measuring Tools
« on: March 12, 2020, 09:09 AM »
I've had an electronic Starrett micrometer and a Starrett electronic slide caliper for a while, but wanted to learn how to "really" read these measuring tools after watching the ABOM79 machining videos.

I had an el cheapo slide caliper and ordered a Starrett manual micrometer. I watched some videos and read the manual.

Surprisingly, I can get to a 10th of a mil with the micrometer and to a mil with the slide caliper. The manual readings jive with ones from the electronic tools.

I seldom use these tools in woodworking, but it's fun learning something new.
Birdhunter

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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7857
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2020, 10:05 AM »
When I first started to use machinist tools the only ones available were vernier style. So my micrometers, caliper and height gage are all manual vernier style.

It was only many years later that dial calipers & dial micrometers first became available. Then sometime after that the battery powered electronic gages first appeared.

Interestingly enough, I noticed on the Starrett website the other day that the old school 24" Vernier Height Gage lists for $2885 while the much easier to read 24" Dial Height Gage lists for $780.  [blink]

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 705
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2020, 12:01 PM »
This Japanese fibreglass caliper is the one I use all the time. It is precise enough for most woodworking tasks, I find.


311922-0


(I do own three other types…)
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 663
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2020, 01:19 PM »
This Japanese fibreglass caliper is the one I use all the time. It is precise enough for most woodworking tasks, I find.


(Attachment Link)


(I do own three other types…)

Oh, that looked nice.. I’m looking for one in high quality plastic/fibreglass or in a composite material. I like my old (cheap in plastic) since it’s precise enough for woodworking and some other uses. The steel ones are terribly sharp and it’s easy to scratch whatever you bump into, and for some things that’s no good. Ant the composite/plastic ones is easier on my clothing as well  [embarassed]

Would you please share where you find these?
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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3234
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2020, 01:41 PM »
One advantage of the non-electronic units is that you don't have to go find a battery when you pull the tool out of the drawer. Most of my electronic tools use a 2032 battery that seems to have a relatively short life once activated.

Also, to me, using a manual tool like a plane, chisel, or micrometer is more satisfying than powering up a big power tool. 
Birdhunter

Offline Precision Dogs

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Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2020, 04:19 PM »
One advantage of the non-electronic units is that you don't have to go find a battery when you pull the tool out of the drawer. Most of my electronic tools use a 2032 battery that seems to have a relatively short life once activated.

Also, to me, using a manual tool like a plane, chisel, or micrometer is more satisfying than powering up a big power tool.

From my experience, manual calipers are nice, but when it comes to making a lot of measurements, my eyes are getting tired looking at the scale when reading while electronic one usually have a nice display with large readout numbers.
As to battery life on calipers, it depends on the manufacturer. My Mitutoyo caliper lasts anywhere from 3-5 years on one battery( and I use it constantly during a day, and every working day). At the same time, I have some cheap electronic one without battery that I a pre set with Mitutoyo and use a depth gauge for checking slots while machining for I don't care if they will get coolant on them. If I will insert battery in them, it will be completely drained in about 6-8 weeks.

Jerry
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Offline jeffinsgf

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Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2020, 04:27 PM »
I've got a couple pairs of vernier calipers that I use for turning...where it's more about matching than measuring. At work I have a digital read-out Mitutoyo...since all the manufacturing guys want to talk in thousandths. At home I have a dial caliper that is calibrated in fractions on the dial...that's my favorite for woodworking. I bought it from Highland in Atlanta years ago. I've seen a few others and have a General plastic one, but none I've seen are as easy to read as the no-name one I got from Highland.

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 705
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2020, 05:14 PM »
>>>Would you please share where you find these?

Sure, bought it from Fine-tools.com (Dieter Schmid, Berlin, Germany). Shinwa brand, so probb available at more shops.
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + TSB1-MW 1000 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · OF2200 · CMS-GE · Vecturo 18 Li · TID 18 · TKS 80 EBS-Set · … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 · Hammer HS950 | TaigaTools VacPods Pro Set
Wishlist: ETS EC 125 w 150 pad, DTS

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 663
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2020, 05:49 PM »
Thanks @Bert Vanderveen

Bokmarked.. They had not only the caliper, but many many other nice tools [scared]
- I did find that Wiha (Naturally, for electricians) have three types as well available. Analog dial, std. with magnifying lens and a digital one - all in fibreglass.
(Good thing that there’s no shop like Fine-Tools nearby me, I would have gone there regularly [eek])

I stumbled over a section worthwhile seeing as well: (Scroll down to: “Workbenches made by our Customers:”)
https://www.fine-tools.com/werkstatt.html

“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline mike_aa

  • Posts: 1178
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2020, 06:49 PM »
...As to battery life on calipers, it depends on the manufacturer. My Mitutoyo caliper lasts anywhere from 3-5 years on one battery( and I use it constantly during a day, and every working day). At the same time, I have some cheap electronic one without battery that I a pre set with Mitutoyo and use a depth gauge for checking slots while machining for I don't care if they will get coolant on them. If I will insert battery in them, it will be completely drained in about 6-8 weeks.

Jerry

Good to know about the Mitutoyo and the battery life.  I have one of those cheap digital ones for woodworking and I found the only way I could ensure the thing would power up next time is to take the batteries out after each use.  I guess I'll be on the lookout for the Mitutoyo!

Mike A.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1787
Re: Manual Measuring Tools
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2020, 07:39 PM »
This Japanese fibreglass caliper is the one I use all the time. It is precise enough for most woodworking tasks, I find.

(Attachment Link)

(I do own three other types…)

And being fiberglass you don't have to worry about ESD zapping your wood ! :-)
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