Author Topic: What's Cooking  (Read 62899 times)

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Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #570 on: August 22, 2019, 01:40 AM »
I am in the market for an immersion blender.  A quick search of the web reveals that there are about 100,000 options.  [scared] [scared]

Anyone have a particular brand/model to recommend? I would like something that is well-made and will last and don't want to skimp on the cost.  But I don't think I need all the bells and whistles I see on some many models out there.  I am thinking I just need this to puree soups and sauces while they're on the stove.

Any suggestions will be appreciated.

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #571 on: August 22, 2019, 08:05 AM »
Had to look up the term "immersion blender".  I know it as "stick blender".  I've had and used a Braun MR430HC for probably 15 years or so, and love it.  Mine is very simple, came with three accessories, only one of which I have ever used.  It's an on/off only model with no bells and whistles.  See if you can find one or an equivalent.   [smile]
- Willy -

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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #572 on: August 22, 2019, 10:36 AM »
Thanks for the inspiration to make scallops @Cheese.

The scallops weren't nearly as big as I had hoped, but they were good anyway.  I kinda copied Cheese's recipe and also made Food & Wine's grilled version with a Miso Corn Salad.  I didn't have any miso paste so I used Korean Doenjang.  They're both fermented soy beans so I figured they were close enough.  I couldn't believe how the arugula cooked down to so little!

























PS if anyone happens to see these cotton candy grapes at their grocery store - try them!  They really smell like cotton candy and are very sweet.  This was the second time buying them.  It only cost $4.99/lb yesterday.  Last time I think it was $7/lb at a different grocery store.

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Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #573 on: August 22, 2019, 11:20 AM »
Had to look up the term "immersion blender".  I know it as "stick blender".  I've had and used a Braun MR430HC for probably 15 years or so, and love it.  Mine is very simple, came with three accessories, only one of which I have ever used.  It's an on/off only model with no bells and whistles.  See if you can find one or an equivalent.   [smile]

Hello Sparky   [smile]  Thanks for the tip.  I'll check it out.

Offline hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #574 on: August 22, 2019, 11:40 AM »
Over the years I have used quite a lot of those stick blenders, both in a professional setting and at home. Somehow I always return to those made by Braun. If you have the option I'd recommend that brand. To me they make the best ones by far.

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #575 on: August 22, 2019, 11:54 AM »
Thanks for the inspiration to make scallops @Cheese.

I couldn't believe how the arugula cooked down to so little!


After the last scallop dish, I decided to put scallops on the menu more often.  [big grin]

The corn salad looks delish...perfect fare for the summer. I always keep a little jar of miso paste in the fridge.

For wilted arugula or wilted spinach, I'll cook a 5 oz package for EACH person. They're kind of like mushrooms, only worse, they're all water.

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #576 on: August 22, 2019, 12:00 PM »
Good idea on adding scallops to the menu more.  I was happy that the scallops last night weren't gritty at all.  Sometimes I get a gritty one.

The corn salad was good.  I added in a jalapeno, but it had absolutely no heat!  It might as well have been a bell pepper.  Everything would have been better cooked on the charcoal grill, but it looked like it was gonna rain yesterday and the scallops were so small it hardly seemed worth the effort.  We also usually have a tub of miso in the fridge, but we used it all up last time we made miso soup.

I only bought 1 5oz tub, which looked like a decent size!  I've cooked other greens in the past, but the arugula seemed to cook up even more than baby spinach.
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Offline Cheese

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What's Cooking...Frank's Baked Chicken Drumettes
« Reply #577 on: August 22, 2019, 12:50 PM »
Baked in the oven at 350º and then a splash of Frank's Red Hot Buffalo Wings sauce.


Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking...Frank's Baked Chicken Drumettes
« Reply #578 on: August 22, 2019, 01:09 PM »
I love wings!

Are those store bought and baked or all homemade?  I guess you prefer the drums to the flats?
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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking...Frank's Baked Chicken Drumettes
« Reply #579 on: August 22, 2019, 01:22 PM »
I love wings!

Are those store bought and baked or all homemade?  I guess you prefer the drums to the flats?

Homemade and simple. I'll post the recipe later today along with a couple of photos. I made them for myself last night because my wife was gone. She got up this morning and finished the remaining 3 in the fridge for breakfast and then requested that I make them again tonight so she could eat her fill.  [eek]

So tonight it is, with a stunning recipe for blue cheese dip for the vegetables.  [big grin]

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #580 on: August 22, 2019, 01:25 PM »
Nice!  It looked like they had a really nice brown color so I was thinking they were premade and you were just heating them up in a 350 degree oven.

So what became of the wing flats??
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Offline Cheese

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What's Cooking...Frank's Baked Chicken Drumettes
« Reply #581 on: August 24, 2019, 10:49 AM »
Here are the only 3 ingredients you need for this recipe.

Frank's Red Hot Buffalo Wings sauce, chicken and olive oil in a spray can.



Preheat the oven to 350º, line a sheet pan with foil and give it a light spray of olive oil. I use spray EVOO for this because it's much easier, faster and less messy than the traditional method of mopping.

Place the chicken on the foil, move each one a little bit to distribute the EVOO on the bottom and then a light spray on top of the chicken. The EVOO promotes the browning of the chicken.



When the oven hits temp, place the chicken in the oven for 25 minutes. I'm baking in the convection mode so take that into consideration.

After 25 minutes remove the pan and flip each piece. This was taken before I flipped the chicken to illustrate that it's just starting to brown.



Return the chicken to the oven and cook for an additional 25 minutes. This is what it should look like after 50 minutes.



I then lightly mop the top with Frank's sauce and return to the oven for 5 minutes.



Remove the pan, flip chicken and mop the bottom. Return for 5 minutes. So the total cooking time is 60 minutes, if you can believe that. I know it seems too long and it may be for chicken wings, but for drummies or drumettes it's perfect.



Plate and add a little more sauce if that's to your liking. This was served with a homemade Roquefort dip that is to-die for. I'll give up the dip recipe once these batteries recharge.  [big grin]


« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 10:54 AM by Cheese »

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #582 on: August 24, 2019, 12:15 PM »
Thanks for sharing your technique!

My friend made me oven baked wings, similar to this once.  I think he used a lot more oil though.  I seem to recall that they were almost oven fried.

I may need to try this soon - like as in maybe tonight!
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #583 on: August 24, 2019, 12:50 PM »
Those wings look great!

If you like the texture of your wings to be more like deep fried but dislike the batter and the mess of deep frying, then here is something that uses baking powder and science to create an alternative.  Of course you can do whatever sauce you want.  I have made this recipe several times and it does work.

https://foodwishes.blogspot.com/2015/01/crispy-honey-sriracha-chicken-wings.html

Peter
« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 12:55 PM by Peter Halle »

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #584 on: August 24, 2019, 02:58 PM »
I did these birds over lump charcoal using the Weber rotisserie. They cooked about 1.5hrs and turned out incredible. Plenty of leftovers for the week.



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Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #585 on: August 24, 2019, 04:02 PM »
Matt,

Those look fantastic.  I've been smoking whole birds (chickens and turkeys) on my ceramic grill and the results look similar to your birds.  Although your method is faster, temps in your grill must be higher.

Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #586 on: August 24, 2019, 04:05 PM »
Peter,

Chef John is my go-to guy for ideas for something to make for dinner. I love his videos and have tried probably fifty of his recipes.  Right now I have enchiladas in the oven that are a version of his recipe. Tomorrow we are going to make a bread recipe that follows from his video.

The wings recipe you reference is very good and turns out great.

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #587 on: August 24, 2019, 04:40 PM »
Matt,

Those look fantastic.  I've been smoking whole birds (chickens and turkeys) on my ceramic grill and the results look similar to your birds.  Although your method is faster, temps in your grill must be higher.

@Rob Z

I own a big green egg as well. If I do them on the egg I spatchcock them first and cook raised indirect at 375 or so. Also turns out great but the rotisserie is better because it's self basting.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BlTvN2El6Lu/?igshid=1jyr6qxa65k2
« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 04:47 PM by DynaGlide »
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #588 on: August 26, 2019, 01:05 PM »
  I just bought an Anova Sous Vide (at a great price, btw) and one question just looking at some recipes - steak and chicken for instance. They give a cooking temp, but I'm seeing cooking times  for each  at between 1 and 4 hours. What gives?
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #589 on: August 26, 2019, 01:32 PM »
The lower cooking time is the minimum cooking time required for the internal temperature to equalize with the water temperature.  The longer cooking time is generally the maximum time you'd want to hold the protein at that temperature.  While it's true you can't "overcook" something from a doneness perspective since the temperature is set, the proteins will start to denature and you may end up eating a nice medium rare piece of mush.

So that means you shouldn't really notice much of a difference in a piece of chicken for example (in terms of taste/texture) that's been cooked for 1 hour vs 4 hours.  That's great because that means the food can wait for you.

I've found Daniel Baldwin's website to be an excellent source of information for sous vide cooking: https://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html.
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #590 on: August 26, 2019, 03:51 PM »
@Bob Marino , another good website is Serious Eats.  If you go there and click on the techniques tab and then sous vide you will find guides for cooking many items.  For instance the chicken section will illustrate how to cook those chicken breasts in different ways so that you can get the juiciness or doneness or even the mouth feel you desire.

Have fun!

Peter

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #591 on: August 26, 2019, 06:18 PM »
  Thanks guys, and I will do some reading up before I do some steaks or fish, but looking at those charts I am still wondering where the 1 - 4 hours variance comes from. Given a certain doneness temp - say 135 for med rare and assuming much more turns to mush, isn't there a sweet spot for the time that most people want their texture to be?
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #592 on: August 26, 2019, 06:45 PM »
Well that's embarrassing.  My apologies, his name is Douglas Baldwin.  I had previously referred to him as Daniel.  I guess I was thinking of the actor.

There's really no need to read up before jumping in.  Just start cooking!

That's a good question where that 1-4 hour window came from.  I've never done any scientific experimentation, but depending on the cooking temperature and specific protein type/thickness,  I believe it would have to cook for a "considerable" amount of time to actually have the texture turn to mush.  I kinda doubt you'd be able to detect a difference if you were cooking a 1.5 - 2" thick steak 4 vs 6 hours. 

I personally cook a vacuum sealed, pre-seasoned, and frozen 1.5" steak for 1.5 - 2 hours at 129F.  If it were a fresh steak, it would be about half that time - 45 minutes - 1 hour.
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #593 on: August 26, 2019, 07:05 PM »
Personally I prefer steaks to be medium rare.  When you get into the realm of being able to cook anything to an exact degree I think that the science can be intimidating and preventative.

Bob, if you want to cook a steak and take it out for a spin, try 130-135 degrees and 1.5 to 2 hrs.  Then take it out of the bag, dry it off, and sear it in a pan to give it some color. 

Then you will begin to understand that sous vide is all about not allowing foods to be overcooked temperature wise.

Peter

Offline Knight Woodworks

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #594 on: August 26, 2019, 07:42 PM »
Hi Bob,

What they said. It also depends on what you’re cooking.  In my experience fish and sea food are usually best at the shorter cooking times. Depending on what texture you prefer, chicken breasts may benefit from longer than minimum recommend. Thickness also plays a roll. Thinner cuts may take a little less time.

Regarding steaks; The quality and thickness of the cut play a significant role. For example, a two inch Fillet cooked at 130 for an hour should be a buttery medium rare. A similar thickness Porterhouse would need two plus hours to reach the same consistency. Again, thickness matters. A three quarter inch Porterhouse should be good in less than an hour.

Shortly after I started Sous Vide cooking I experimented with chicken breasts and NY Strip. Based on Serious Eats I cooked three chicken breasts at the recommended temperature. The first one came out as soon as possible, the second was removed half way through the recommended cooking time, the third at the end. For chicken breast, we generally preferred the ‘chew’ of shorter cooking times.

I did the same thing for the three Strip steaks. In this case the middle duration was the clear winner. In both cases the longest duration resulted in protein on a plate. 

Recently I’ve been experimenting with pork bacon as well as pork and lamb sausage. Turns out Sous Vide is an excellent way to prepare these. Give it a try.

If you get serious about Sous Vide consider getting a vacuum sealer (on sale).

Enjoy your new appliance.

John


Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #595 on: August 27, 2019, 09:19 AM »
For those new to sous vide cooking, please, please, please read up on at least the basic science of it.  In order for bacteria to be reduced to acceptable levels you have two choices:

1.  Cook to a higher internal temperature quickly (the Health Department approved method using direct heat), or
2.  Cook to a lower temperature for a longer time (compare to a child wearing down a parent for a new phone over time).

Please pay attention to the minimum times and be careful about shortening times without doing research beforehand.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Peter

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #596 on: August 27, 2019, 03:57 PM »
On Sunday I used @Cheese's technique to make wings.  They came out really nicely!

I was surprised by how much liquid and fat came out of the wings before I flipped them.  I believe the wings must have had extra water added as opposed to the so called "air chilled" chickens.













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Offline sassyinpink

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #597 on: August 29, 2019, 02:36 AM »
For those new to sous vide cooking, please, please, please read up on at least the basic science of it.  In order for bacteria to be reduced to acceptable levels you have two choices:

1.  Cook to a higher internal temperature quickly (the Health Department approved method using direct heat), or
2.  Cook to a lower temperature for a longer time (compare to a child wearing down a parent for a new phone over time).

Please pay attention to the minimum times and be careful about shortening times without doing research beforehand.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Peter
hmm i just ordered my avos.
go to higher internal temperature faster? how do we do that. so like i start using a bigger flame at the beginning or boil the water faster?

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #598 on: August 29, 2019, 11:23 AM »
go to higher internal temperature faster? how do we do that. so like i start using a bigger flame at the beginning or boil the water faster?

I'm not Peter obviously, but I believe Peter was referring to just the traditional method of cooking - for example, cook a chicken breast in a skillet until its internal temperature reaches 165F.  That temperature would be achieved relatively quickly (depending on the size of breast and the stove's heat level, maybe 5-10 minutes per side) compared to sous vide cooking, which usually kills off the majority of the bacteria through the combination of time and temperature.

This is a bit of a repeat, but we've recently been talking about sous vide so I thought I'd post it again.  Last night I cooked a frozen preseasoned strip steak for 2 hours at 129F.  I took the vacuum bag out and let it cool off for a while (I've found that the steak tends to overcook if seared directly from the water bath) and seared it for about 2 minutes per side with a weight on top.  I served it with some powdered mashed potatoes that I made with evaporated milk.




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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #599 on: August 29, 2019, 11:55 AM »
@GoingMyWay , you are absolutely correct.  Perhaps an explanation of my previous post is in order.

My younger brother was an early implementor of sous vide and offered me a present of one when then were far more expensive than today.  I scoffed at the idea and declined.  Later I got interested and actually bought another brother a controller that would change the cheapest crock pot in a "sous vide machine."  When the Anova came out I became fascinated and purchased one for myself and started researching.

About the same time my wife was involved with a possible food service project I attended a food safety course aimed at restaurants.  Being the guy that I am (and like so many here) I talked to the teacher about sous vide.  The large eyes and raised eyebrows told a story by themselves.

Basically the food cooking guidelines in regards to when a food is done is based on the science that when a food is cooked quickly like in an establishment and they reach that acceptable temp for a micro second they are done.  That is ultra conservative and ultra safe.

The science is there to support the "kill bacteria over a longer time at lower temps via wearing them out over time" but those in the food safety industry haven't accepted it yet.

Peter