Author Topic: What's Cooking  (Read 111273 times)

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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #870 on: August 23, 2020, 09:32 AM »
I went shopping at Wegman's yesterday.  They have a whole Stonewall Kitchen section!



Other grocery stores might have something similar that I never noticed before.

I picked up the Country Ketchup and the Blueberry Pancake mix.  I haven't tried either yet.  I thought my wife liked blueberry pancakes, but apparently she said she doesn't really like blueberry anything  :o.  The one exception are the blueberry muffins that she got at a class she took that was being held at the Ritz Carlton.  I wonder if it's possible to convert the blueberry pancake mix into blueberry muffins.

Last night I tried recreating one of my favorite dishes from my favorite Chinese restaurant (that sadly closed 5 years ago).  They called it "House Special Chicken" - it was julienned chicken strips,  julienned snow peas, and bamboo shoots in a spicy sauce.  I've never found this dish on the menu at any other Chinese restaurant, nor could I find any recipe online.

I marinated the chicken strips in some light soy sauce, corn starch, and a little sesame oil.  Then I sauteed the chicken strips for a few minutes and tossed in the snow peas and canned bamboo shoots.  I used a combination of sambal oelek and chili garlic sauce for the heat.  The rest of the sauce was chicken broth, a little more soy sauce, and a tiny bit of sugar.













The dish tasted pretty similar to how I remember the restaurant's version.

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Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #871 on: August 23, 2020, 10:07 AM »
I went shopping at Wegman's yesterday.  They have a whole Stonewall Kitchen section!

Last night I tried recreating one of my favorite dishes from my favorite Chinese restaurant (that sadly closed 5 years ago).  They called it "House Special Chicken" - it was julienned chicken strips,  julienned snow peas, and bamboo shoots in a spicy sauce.  I've never found this dish on the menu at any other Chinese restaurant, nor could I find any recipe online.


I really like the looks of all the julienned ingredients.  [smile]  They'd also cook quickly.  [big grin]  The dish looks good.

Do you have something that juliennes the ingredients quickly/easily? I'd have to do all that work by hand with a knife.  [sad]

Talking about Stonewall products, another one that has a permanent place in our fridge, is their Buffalo Aioli. Here's their recipe for Buffalo Chicken Lettuce Wraps.

https://www.stonewallkitchen.com/buffalo-chicken-lettuce-wraps-R376.html

« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 10:11 AM by Cheese »

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #872 on: August 23, 2020, 10:55 AM »
Yup everything did cook quickly.  I sauteed the chicken strips for 5 minutes before adding the snow peas and bamboo and cooked for another 5 minutes.  That cooking time probably could have been cut in half even.

I don't have any kitchen gadget to quickly julienne.  I cut the chicken and snow peas by hand.  The snow peas actually weren't that bad because I stacked 3-4 up at a time.  I tried to stack 2 slices of chicken breasts up but I found they were too slippery so I julienned each chicken strip 1 at a time.  I only used 1 chicken breast so it also wasn't bad.  I bought bamboo shoots that were already cut into strips.
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Offline hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #873 on: August 23, 2020, 11:16 AM »
It is a bit sweet to my taste as well. But still much much better than the rest that is either too salty, or too spicy, or way too sweet.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 11:19 AM by hdv »

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking: Avocado Corn Salad with Scallops
« Reply #874 on: August 24, 2020, 10:57 AM »
I had a few left-over ears of corn so I made this salad to go alongside some sautéed scallops. I eliminated the bacon so as not to tamp down the flavor of the scallops.

https://www.today.com/recipes/avocado-corn-bacon-salad-lime-vinaigrette-recipe-t111620

This is a great corn salad recipe. I've paired it with chicken and have also used it with flanksteak. I'll usually double the vinaigrette so I can also drizzle it over the protein that I use.  [smile] 

Sometimes I've also thrown in some black beans and then seasoned the meat with some cumin to give it a Southwestern twist. It all works.

If you don't like cilantro you could substitute parsley, basil, spinach or arugula.

The scallops take on a brown cast because of the browned butter I used to sauté them.

« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 11:04 AM by Cheese »

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #875 on: August 24, 2020, 12:10 PM »
I made our favorite frozen fries in the air fryer yesterday to try the Country Ketchup.



This was the first time making frozen fries in the air fryer.  The fries came out really nicely and took less than 10 minutes.





On the left is regular Heinz Ketchup and the Country Ketchup is on the right.  My first thought was the Country Ketchup was sweet, but then I detected the spiciness.  I really liked the subtle heat in it along with the texture and chunkiness.  My wife said it reminded her more of sambal than ketchup, but she liked it.  It was totally different and nothing like we've ever had before.  Thanks for the suggestion!

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Offline hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #876 on: August 24, 2020, 01:32 PM »
Ah, sambal. There's my vice! I made, ate, and still eat lots of that stuff (though less than I used to do). It used to be it couldn't be hot enough for me, but since a couple of years I have made a deliberate effort to tone it down. I found it had reduced my ability to taste subtle flavours. Luckily my tasting buds have regained their full spectrum again. Still, I will not easily turn down a good sambal. Djeruk might be my favourite type of sambal. Oelek definitely is my least favourite one.

Online rvieceli

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #877 on: August 24, 2020, 05:15 PM »
Here’s a bit of yummy comfort food for us.

Italian beef in the slow cooker. Very easy and very forgiving. No haters please, got this recipe from my born in Italy aunt. I have modified it slightly over the years for the slow cooker.



Start with a Chuck roast, don’t use anything fancier or less marbled. Won’t be as good. This one was about 3 pounds. You can use a bigger one, once done it portions up and freezes well, maybe adjust your wine and garlic amounts accordingly.

Splash some red wine in the slow cooker 6-8 ounces. Put the roast in, no need for browning. Toss in 6-8 or more garlic cloves. Put them on a cutting board, take the flat of your knife over the top of one and bash to break up the clove and remove the peel before adding in.

Let it go on low for about 6 or so hours. I usually flip it about halfway through. But you don’t need to. When it’s done it will literally fall apart. Remove from your cooker. Using two forks pull it apart like you were doing pulled pork  [smile]

Leave the garlic cloves or take them out or smash them up. Your choice.

You are going to get the meat back into the pot but leave the fat and gristle behind.





Here comes the secret ingredient:



Yup that’s right a package of Au jus gravy mix. I almost had a stroke when she told me  [eek]

But it works.

Throw everything back in the slow cooker and let it go for a while longer to let the gravy mix incorporate.

Serve on the rolls of your choice.  Yum [wink]

Some folks like a more liquid result, just add more wine in the beginning.  [big grin]

Ron
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 05:31 PM by rvieceli »

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #878 on: August 24, 2020, 09:15 PM »
That looks good Ron. However I’m surprised that there is no browning required as that does produce the fron which is the basis for flavor.

I’m going to try it and will report back.  [big grin]  Thanks for the recipe.

Online rvieceli

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #879 on: August 24, 2020, 09:47 PM »
@Cheese

Here’s a quote from Jamie Oliver from his cookbook “Jamie’s Dinners” I think.

“The great thing about this stew is that it gets put together very quickly, and this is partly to do with the fact that no time is spent browning the meat. Even though this goes against all my training, I experimented with two batches of meat – I browned one and put the other straight into the pot. The latter turned out to be the sweeter and cleaner-tasting, so I’ve stopped browning the meat for most of my stews these days.”

Also I think I’d suggest at least a 4-5 pound chuck roast. I don’t cook with much salt and depending on the au jus mix it can be a bit salty.

Ron
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 09:58 PM by rvieceli »

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #880 on: August 24, 2020, 11:58 PM »
@Cheese

Here’s a quote from Jamie Oliver from his cookbook “Jamie’s Dinners” I think.

“The great thing about this stew is that it gets put together very quickly, and this is partly to do with the fact that no time is spent browning the meat. Even though this goes against all my training, I experimented with two batches of meat – I browned one and put the other straight into the pot. The latter turned out to be the sweeter and cleaner-tasting, so I’ve stopped browning the meat for most of my stews these days.”

Also I think I’d suggest at least a 4-5 pound chuck roast. I don’t cook with much salt and depending on the au jus mix it can be a bit salty.

Ron

That's interesting Ron...

Jamie Oliver is one of only 6-10 "celebrity chefs" that I consider produce meals that are consistently good/great. The vast majority of them can be hit or miss.

Whether it's that the restaurant style proportions don't scale down to the "dinner for two" or that there are magic tweaks along the line that the chefs incorporate but fail to mention, a lot of them just don't transfer from the restaurant to the home kitchen.

This includes Emeril...some of his are good while others are just OK.

One of the most decadent recipes I've ever made was by Jamie Oliver for a grouping for New Years Eve and it was a full 6# beef tenderloin rolled in sautéed fresh mushrooms and wrapped in thyme & prosciutto. OMG...to die for.

Along that line of thought, one of my go-to "celebrity chefs" that consistently hits it out of the park is Ina Garten. She performs at the 90% level consistently. I've cooked so many of her recipes and they are always so delicious. She's just tough on the trouser size...a little goes a long weighs.  [big grin]
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 02:04 AM by Cheese »

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #881 on: September 04, 2020, 06:10 PM »
I've liked Jamie Oliver since I first saw his show, the Naked Chef.  He's got a new vegetarian cooking show we saw recently.

We made homemade fried chicken and dirty rice last weekend.  I used Charlie Andrew's recipe:

To my surprise, the fried chicken was nicely seasoned, though the onion powder was a little too overwhelming (that's all I could really smell when the chicken was frying).  I don't think we'll be making the dirty rice again.  It was a lot of work and the rice came out under cooked.  It did look very similar to Popeye's cajun rice.











The leftover fried chicken reheated nicely in the air fryer.  The inside wasn't fully warm, but the skin was crispy.





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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #882 on: September 04, 2020, 06:15 PM »
We made "Hawaiian" ham steak like my grandparents used to make for an easy weeknight meal.  I think they usually used Mash ham steaks and would also sprinkle brown sugar on my section to make it sweeter.  The Wegman's ham steak wasn't that salty.

I also tried oven roasting yukon gold potatoes - 425F convection oven, but they didn't turn out nearly as nice as @deepcreek.  I think part of the issue might have been I peeled the potatoes (I hate potato skins - even the "thin" skinned potatoes) and then soaked them in water.  I did dry the potatoes before cutting up, but maybe they were still kind of on the wet side.  We saute our green beans with a little salt, pepper, pepper flakes, and chicken or mushroom powder.  These green beans were exceptionally "stringy."











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Offline notenoughcash

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #883 on: September 13, 2020, 08:51 AM »
sum nice looking grub on here!

we need a mouth watering emoji.....  (SITE DEVELOPERS PLEASE!!!!)
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Online SRSemenza

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #884 on: September 13, 2020, 11:18 PM »
I frequently pan fry ham steaks. I like butter for the frying in this case due to the flavor it adds. Do one side , flip spread brown sugar and mustard on the top side. It melts together and gets some of the butter mixed in from the surface of the ham.
 

Quick, easy, and really good. 

Seth

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #885 on: September 14, 2020, 05:37 PM »
Ham steaks are really good.  They're very easy and quick to prepare and relatively inexpensive.  We should have them more often, but I tend to forget about them.  I just remembered that my grandmother made a ham steak baked in a little bit of milk (she only had skim milk).  The version with pineapple is far superior.

I'm not sure if anyone else has ever tried these grapes, but the Moon Drops are really good and such a unique shape.  The Gum Drop grapes are also good, just like the Cotton Candy grapes that I tried last year.







We tried the Stonewall Kitchens Blueberry Pancakes.  They were pretty good and I don't even like blueberries.



I tried making the dry rub wings again in the air fryer.  This time I used much less of the rub and they turned out better.



I also made some cauliflower in the air fryer.  The first time I mixed the garlic, hot smoked Spanish paprika, and salt into the oil and tossed with the cauliflower.  Most of the seasonings were stuck to the bowl and only globs made it onto the cauliflower.







The second time I just mixed the oil and garlic and then sprinkled the salt and paprika over top for better coverage.  I actually think I like the globs of seasoning better!





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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #886 on: September 14, 2020, 05:42 PM »
Made cottage pie over the weekend.

















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Offline hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #887 on: September 15, 2020, 02:40 PM »
Today I made some seabuckthorn-squash jam (I hope I chose the correct name here. Not sure about the difference between squash and pumpkin, nor if it is marmalade or jam. Where I am from marmalade is a very particular type of jam. Ah, well. I think you'll understand what I meant.)

You'll need equal amounts or seabuckthorn, squash, and sugar. I used 500 gr of each. And one and a half oranges.

  • Clean the seabuckthorn
  • Cut the skin of the squash and remove the seeds with a spoon
  • Scrub the peel of the oranges to remove any wax or chemicals
  • Use a zester to scrape only the coloured part of the peel (you don't want to use the white part, as it is very bitter)
  • Squeeze the juice from the oranges
  • Bring the seabuckthorn berries to a boil
  • Let them simmer until they start to break
  • Use a food mill to get rid of the seeds and most of the skin (you really don't want to keep the seeds, you can't compare them to bramble seeds)
  • Put what is left of the seabuckthorn in a pan (don't forget to use a wooden spoon to get what's sticking to the underside of the food mill, it would be a shame to waste it)
  • Add the squash
  • Let simmer until the squash breaks down (I use an immersion blender to speed up the process in order to preserve as much of the taste as possible)
  • Add the sugar, zest, and orange juice
  • Heat until the jam has reached a core temperature of 80°C
  • Put the jam in sterilised jars and put them away upside-down
  • After about half an hour you can turn the jars again
  • If you took care to work as clean as possible, the jam will easily keep 2 years when stored in a cool, dry, and dark place

Enjoy!

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #888 on: September 16, 2020, 05:50 PM »
Interesting.  I've never heard of sea buckthorn before.  I wonder if it's available in the US.

Last night I tried making Pomodori al Riso (Rice Stuffed Tomatoes).  It seemed relatively simple and has a nice presentation.  I soaked the arborio rice for 45 minutes in the tomato juice and then cooked the stuffed tomatoes for 1 1/2 hours, but unfortunately the rice still wasn't fully cooked.  I'm think I should have soaked the rice for much longer than 45 minutes.



















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Online SRSemenza

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #889 on: September 17, 2020, 12:57 AM »
 @GoingMyWay BTW, I see that you have a Wegmans near you.

Seth

Offline hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #890 on: September 17, 2020, 06:34 AM »
We do have those brushes around here (mostly along the coast line), but almost no one is using them. In Scandinavia (there they call it havtorn), the Baltic States and Russia it is quite popular. There you can even buy them freshly frozen in most supermarkets. Picking the berries in the wild is a bugger though. Those thorns are really nasty and there are way too many of them. I read that they created a cultivar of the species without thorns, just to make commercial viable harvesting possible.

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #891 on: September 17, 2020, 07:32 AM »
@GoingMyWay BTW, I see that you have a Wegmans near you.

Seth

Yup we have a very large Wegmans close by.  I don't normally shop there, but I have gone 2 times recently and really enjoyed it!
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Online Cheese

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What's Cooking, Pressing Roma Tomatoes, after all it is the season.
« Reply #892 on: September 23, 2020, 12:11 AM »
This is a yearly ritual for us, purchasing a couple of bushels of fresh ripe, red, orange Roma tomatoes to eventually turn into a sauce of our choosing.
Roma tomatoes are better than your typical eating tomatoes for this chore because there is more "meat" and less juice. Less juice means there is less "burner time" trying to reduce the water content. 

It's all pretty simple, cut the tomatoes into small enough pieces & then crush the tomatoes using a Kitchenaid, which eliminates the skins and seeds, and then reduce the water content by bringing the crushed tomatoes to a low/slow boil for several hours. Then can appropriately and they will last for 2-3 years in the cellar. Nummy...

In the past I've added spices, onions, garlic, green peppers, Italian peppers, parsley, basil...you name it to the batch but found out that sometimes these additions only contributed to spoiling the product prematurely. I've now settled on using just straight crushed tomatoes and leave the additions for later when I'm actually cooking the sauce. That's a much better approach.

So in the simplest form here goes.  [smile]

Cut tomatoes in the upper tray, tomato juice & pulp draining into the stainless pan on the LH side and the "pooped out tomato skins & seeds" on the RH side.




Here's another view.












And here are the results...3 pans full of tomato pressings and placed on the stove to reduce on low at 6:39.




And 4 hours later, only 2 pans of tomato pressings to can.

« Last Edit: September 23, 2020, 10:45 AM by Cheese »

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #893 on: October 05, 2020, 06:15 PM »
Last week we made Thomas Keller's Roast Chicken.  It was pretty simple, but the bottom of the chicken sitting on the potatoes prevented the underside of the chicken from cooking all the way through so it required a slightly longer cooking time so that the bottom of the chicken was fully cooked.









I recently bought the Weber griddle insert and this smash burger kit.  Smashed burgers get a great crust.  The last couple kinda burnt because the charcoal got too hot and I waited too long to flip.  Next time I might put the griddle on the butane stove for better heat control.





















Yesterday we made Chef John's Lomo Saltado.  It had a good taste.  We increased the amount of soy sauce to make more sauce.

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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #894 on: October 07, 2020, 05:35 PM »
Last night I made a quick pasta dish inspired by my dad.  He wasn't much a cook at all, but I had recently remembered that he used to add sherry cooking wine to alfredo sauce to eat with rotini and braciole.  I used 5 tbsp of dry sherry (not the cooking wine that's loaded with salt like he used to use) and 1 jar of alfredo sauce for a 1lb box of rotini pasta and 2 sauteed chicken breasts.  We could have used another jar of sauce, but I really enjoyed the flavor.  It brought back some fond memories.





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Offline mkasdin

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #895 on: October 08, 2020, 03:35 AM »
Hi!

Those of you who follow me on Instagram might have seen a couple of these, big time foodie here. :) I think we're cooking as much as we're going out for dinner/lunch - I don't always take pictures ...

Here's some stuff I've cooked/baked - please enjoy.

So this is - by far - our favorite starter for menus. It's quite simple as it's just tiger prawns with a cream sauce (shallots) made in the same pan the tiger prawns were roasted/seared in and a piece of puff pastry. Sometimes we add some mushrooms to the sauce.



Another quick & easy favorite dish is pasta with salmon. Sometimes it is not quick - when we make our own pasta - but the salmon and sauce are easily and quickly made.



We love oysters.



Kind regards,
Oliver
What hours is your restaurant open. Do I need to make a reservation? During Covid lock down it’s been frozen Trader Joe’s entrees. Nothing like what you’ve been eating

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #896 on: October 13, 2020, 04:28 PM »
I made a chicken and wild rice casserole over the weekend. 















My wife made a small pot rice noodle soup with homemade rice noodles.





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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #897 on: October 14, 2020, 09:56 AM »
For Taco Tuesday, we made tongue tacos.  I brined the tongue for 24 hours and then cooked it sous vide for 24 hours at 165F.  This is definitely the longest I've ever cooked anything sous vide.  I was afraid that the tongue might be salty after brining for 24 hours, but actually came out under seasoned. 























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Offline mkasdin

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Re: What's Cooking: Avocado Corn Salad with Scallops
« Reply #898 on: October 15, 2020, 05:17 AM »
I had a few left-over ears of corn so I made this salad to go alongside some sautéed scallops. I eliminated the bacon so as not to tamp down the flavor of the scallops.

https://www.today.com/recipes/avocado-corn-bacon-salad-lime-vinaigrette-recipe-t111620

This is a great corn salad recipe. I've paired it with chicken and have also used it with flanksteak. I'll usually double the vinaigrette so I can also drizzle it over the protein that I use.  [smile] 

Sometimes I've also thrown in some black beans and then seasoned the meat with some cumin to give it a Southwestern twist. It all works.

If you don't like cilantro you could substitute parsley, basil, spinach or arugula.

The scallops take on a brown cast because of the browned butter I used to sauté them.

(Attachment Link)
your fancy dishes 🍽 look delish!

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #899 on: October 28, 2020, 06:15 PM »
Recently made Chef John's Baked Ziti.  It was good, but I think I might like America's Test Kitchen's Skillet Baked Ziti a little more (mostly because it's faster and easier).  Chef John's version is definitely better if you're feeding a crowd!















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