Author Topic: What's Cooking  (Read 89709 times)

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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #810 on: June 24, 2020, 04:47 PM »
I'd love the recipe.
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Offline Gregor

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #811 on: June 24, 2020, 07:18 PM »

Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #812 on: June 25, 2020, 02:43 PM »
@Cheese: I tried your Orzo salad today. I did not have any pasta and was not able to go shopping, so I used wild rice instead. That's a great recipe! I really enjoyed that meal. Thanks for sharing.

OK, here's how I make Indian Chicken Balti. It's probably not how the people from India themselves would make it (although it is close to authentic), but I and my wife love the taste of this dish.

You need: 3 tablespoons rice oil, 2 large yellow onions, a double filet of chicken breast, 6 ripe tomatoes, 3 or 4 tablespoons mild thick yoghurt (depending on your taste), juice of 1 lemon, 1 or 2 fresh green chillies, some sprigs of fresh coriander (only used to garnish before serving, can be left out if you don't like the taste)

For the spice mix: 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon cardamom, freshly ground black pepper from the mill, 1/2 teaspoon dried coriander seeds, 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds, 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger, 2 teaspoons grated fresh garlic, 1 teaspoon garam masala, 1 teaspoon chilli powder, 1 teaspoon salt (I leave this out myself)

Crush the spices in a mortar until you get a smooth paste. If needed add a few drops of oil. If you don't have a mortar, a blender might work as well (never tried it to be honest).

Cut the onions in rings. Chop the tomatoes (no need to skin them). Cut the chicken in cubes of about 35 mm (1.5 inch). If you don't want your meal too spicy, remove the seeds from the green chillies (I like to leave them in). After that chop them in rings or smaller pieces.

Heat the oil in a large thick-walled wok or cast-iron pan. Add the onions and stir until they are glazed. Add the spice mix. Fry while taking care not to burn the spices. Continue until the spices really start to give off their fragrance. Add the tomatoes. Wait until the juice of the tomatoes is thickened a bit. Add the chicken. Cover the pan and let cook for about 10 minutes. Add the yoghurt and let cook for another 10 minutes. Check once in a while that the food does not get burned. Add water if necessary. Add the lemon juice and fresh chillies and stir lightly. Garnish with fresh coriander (optional). Serve and enjoy!

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #813 on: June 26, 2020, 10:24 AM »
@Cheese: I tried your Orzo salad today. I did not have any pasta and was not able to go shopping, so I used wild rice instead. That's a great recipe! I really enjoyed that meal. Thanks for sharing.

@hdv
Good for you... [big grin]...I think the wild rice variation would be delicious! Those green vegetables add a brightness to the meal.  [smile]

I'm going to try your Chicken Balti dish.

Would toasted sesame oil be a good substitute for the rice oil? I've never seen or heard of rice oil.

What fresh green chillies would you recommend? Locally, we always have poblano, jalapeño, New Mexico, serrano and habanero. Sometimes there's also some small Thai chillies available. The farmer's market is open today so I'll walk down and investigate what they have also, after I've finished my demo to 3 neighbors on the proper way to use & handle a chop miter saw.  [eek]


Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #814 on: June 26, 2020, 12:05 PM »
Personally I wouldn't use sesame oil. That type of oil has a tendency to be predominant in taste. Especially when it's heated too much. Plain rice bran oil is best. This is what I use: King's Rice Bran Oil

We use lombok chillies when the taste has to be moderate. For more fire we use rawit or Thai chillies. However, in India serrano type chillies are more popular. Here they are a bit hard to get, but if you can get them over there, I would recommend those.

Be careful not to mix red chillies with those bloody chopped off fingers!  [scared] [eek]


Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #815 on: June 26, 2020, 12:54 PM »
Thanks for the chicken balti recipe and the clarification on the oil and type of chilies to use.  I'd also never heard of rice oil before.

It's been 3 days and the gravlax is ready.  All the brown sugar seems to have melted/dissolved, but there's still a lot of salt on top.  We used Morton Kosher Salt because we've found that the Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt isn't salty enough for us and feared the salmon wouldn't be cured/salty enough.  We rinsed the salmon under water to remove all the excess salt.  The gravlax is very salty, almost bordering on inedibly salty like that Nova Lox I bought before.  We only ate the thinly sliced gravlax straight up.  It might be more tolerable on a bagel or piece of bread with a nice smear of cream cheese.

Next time we'll try using Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt.



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Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #816 on: June 26, 2020, 03:02 PM »
@GoingMyWay: did you turn the fish every 12 hrs? When I look at the salt crystals I would guess not. I would have to look it up in one of my Swedish recipe books, but I think I remember from the last time I made gravlax myself that turning was a must. And dill! No gravlax without dill!  [cool]

But as far as salt is concerned. Yeah, my experience in Sweden is that the food can be quite salty over there.  [blink] I have learned to ask to go easy on the salt in restaurants, when I'm there.

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #817 on: June 26, 2020, 03:07 PM »
Nope no turning, we chose the easy "set it and forget it" method.  I wonder if maybe 3 days also might have been too long?  We didn't have any dill.  My wife didn't think that would matter much, but all 3 recipes we watched used dill.

I actually like well seasoned foods so if I think something is salty then it must be really salty!
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Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #818 on: June 26, 2020, 04:31 PM »
I don't know if it will be much different from what you used, but if you want I could translate an original Swedish recipe from one of my cookbooks to English for you. I can do that tomorrow. BTW, I am almost sure I let the salmon cure for no more than 48 hrs. Maybe that's the cause of the salty taste?

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #819 on: June 26, 2020, 04:34 PM »
That would be great, if it's not too much trouble to translate.  Might be the combination of not turning, wrong kind of salt, no dill, and curing too long.
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Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #820 on: June 26, 2020, 06:16 PM »
I’ve wanted to make gravlax for the last 5-10 years but I could never decide on what recipe to use. Curing time varies from 2 days to 5 days, while some recipes say flip the salmon and others say just leave it alone.

Then there’s always the sugar to salt ratios... they are all over the map. The only thing every recipe agreed on was an abundant use of fresh dill.

I may have to revisit the recipe if I can settle on a sugar to salt ratio.  [big grin]

Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #821 on: June 27, 2020, 06:58 AM »
OK, this is adapted from recipes I found in Bonniers Stora Kokbok, an old Swedish recipe I got from friends, and a cookbook from Anna Mosesson.

1 kilo Salmon, de-boned and descaled, but with skin (*)
4 tablespoons salt (**)
4 tablespoons white sugar
2 tablespoons freshly crushed white pepper corns
300 gr fresh dill

(*) It is best to have 1 large piece that is cut in two along the bone so you end up with two symmetric parts
(**) This is just my opinion, but salt is salt. There is no "more" or "less" salty salt. What can differ is the additives in refined salt (here most salts have added iodine, unlike kosher salt) or the trace amounts of other minerals (like sulfate, magnesium and calcium) in rock salt or sea salt.

- Mix the salt, sugar, and pepper
- Thoroughly rinse the dill and swing it a few times to get most of the water off again
- Chop 2/3 of the dill
- Sprinkle one third of the salt mix in a dish
- Put the first half of the salmon in the dish, with the skin down
- Sprinkle the chopped dill on the salmon
- Sprinkle another third of the salt mix on the salmon and dill
- Put the second half of the salmon with the skin up on the first piece of salmon
- Sprinkle the last third of the salt mix over the salmon
- Cover with foil
- Put a plate on top of the foil
- Put some extra weight on the plate (2 or 3 cans will do)
- Place in the refrigerator
- Turn every 12 hours and pour the liquid from the dish over and between the fish
- Do this for at least 24 hours, but no more than 48 hours (depending on your taste)
- Remove the spices and herbs from the fish
- Use kitchen towels/paper to dry the fish
- Cut in thin slices (tradition dictates this should be done under 45 degrees)
- Chop the last third of the dill
- Sprinkle the dill on the salmon
- Enjoy your gravad lax

Of course, gravad lax must be served with hovmästersås (mustard-dill sause)!

BTW, this dish is called gravad lax (buried salmon in a loose translation) because in the past the Swedes used to bury the fish in the ground while letting it cure.

@Cheese: all the "authentic" recipes I know always use a ratio of about 1:1 for the salt and sugar. But you are right about the curing times. This is just like curries and other traditional family recipes. Every family will do this their own way. The longer you let the fish cure, the more salt it will absorb. Like I said in a previous post, Swedes do like their food quite salty. So that is something to keep in mind. I myself let the fish cure for about 36 hrs (according to my notes, it's been a while since I made this dish). Their other vice is sugar. If you ever go to Sweden, try to visit a candy store. You'll never know what hit you! There can be literally rows upon rows of different types of candy, chocolate, and other sweets. I think I read somewhere that the largest candy store in the world is located in Sweden. I wouldn't be surprised if that were true!

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #822 on: June 27, 2020, 10:21 AM »
Thanks for the additional original Swedish recipe @hdv  [smile]

Some additional thoughts:
I’ve always heard that the salmon should be prepared in a non-reactive container, meaning glass or ceramic and should be covered with a non-reactive material like Saran Wrap.
The traditional mustard sauce is a must, do you also have a recipe for that?
Tradition also suggests the Gravlax (gravad lax...buried salmon...love that  [big grin]) be served with rye bread or pumpernickel bread.
With the Copper River Season about to open, I’m thinking about using that as a base for this dish.
Suggested weights to place on the salmon have usually been unopened 28 oz cans of tomatoes/tomato sauce.

Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #823 on: June 27, 2020, 11:31 AM »
About the container and cover: yeah, I forgot to mention that, but you are 100% correct. I made the mistake of using tinfoil once. The taste of metal was clearly noticeable in the salmon.  I don't recommend that. After that I only used glass dishes or bowls and Saran wrap.

I do have a recipe for the sauce. I'll look it up later this evening.

Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #824 on: June 27, 2020, 01:05 PM »
Here's my recipe for gravlax sås:

- 100 gr mild mustard (I use Swedish mustard from Slotts)
- 3 dl vegetable oil (*)
- 75 gr sugar
- 1 tablespoon vinegar (I use self-made dill or estragon vinegar)
- 1 teaspoon salt
- A few turns of a mill with white pepper
- 150 gr chopped dill

(*) Do not use olive oil! Some use canola or colza oil, because those are popular in Sweden. However, I do not recommend those either. The taste is too strong. Try to use a vegetable oil with a mild taste.

Mix the mustard, sugar, vinegar, salt, pepper, and dill. Only after that slowly stir in the oil. Add the oil drop for drop. Keep stirring until the sauce thickens.

That's all!

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #825 on: June 27, 2020, 02:33 PM »
Thanks for the additional recipes.  I didn't realize it was actually called gravad lax, which translated to buried salmon.  Now it's making sense, especially why I was seeing some spellings with a D in it.

We used a large rectangular Pyrex dish as the base and then a 8x8 square Pyrex dish filled with 2 cans of 15oz peaches, a 20oz can of pineapple chunks, and a 20oz can of Brunswick Stew to weigh the salmon down.  28oz can might have been better since they're heavier.

I picked up some pumpernickel bread at the grocery store. The salmon was much better served on bread with cream cheese.  Still a tad bit too salty.



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Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #826 on: June 27, 2020, 05:06 PM »
Sometimes I use rye bread, but I like Leksands knäcke better. I think you call it crispbread?

In Scandinavia they often eat crème fraîche where we would choose cream cheese. At first I had to get used to it, but now I really like that. Especially with chopped chives.

You bought a vacuum sealer, didn't you? I never tried it myself, but I know someone who tried to make gravad lax that way. Never asked her how it turned out though.

Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #827 on: June 27, 2020, 05:12 PM »
Thanks for the graved lax recipe @hdv - Gonna try that, too! :)

Today we had pasta with scampi.



Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #828 on: June 27, 2020, 05:19 PM »
Sometimes I use rye bread, but I like Leksands knäcke better. I think you call it crispbread?

In Scandinavia they often eat crème fraîche where we would choose cream cheese. At first I had to get used to it, but now I really like that. Especially with chopped chives.

You bought a vacuum sealer, didn't you? I never tried it myself, but I know someone who tried to make gravad lax that way. Never asked her how it turned out though.

I've never tried crispbread before.  I think I've seen it in stores before though.

Yup I sure did buy a vacuum sealer.  We talked about maybe vacuum sealing the gravlax, but thought we better try the traditional way first.  Maybe next time I can try vacuum sealing it.  I'm very keen on vacuum sealing anything and everything - I'm like a hammer so everything looks like a nail  ;).

Thanks for the graved lax recipe @hdv - Gonna try that, too! :)

Today we had pasta with scampi.



Kind regards,
Oliver

Is that an alfredo sauce?
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Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #829 on: June 27, 2020, 05:24 PM »
Nope, it's a cream sauce. Prepared in the pan the scampi were seared in. Add some shallots, garlic ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

"... . Say yes to stuff, and it will take you interesting places." - Anne Richards, CEO Fidelity International

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #830 on: June 28, 2020, 08:54 AM »
@hdv  which Slotts mustard?








Online hdv

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #831 on: June 28, 2020, 09:31 AM »
Definitely the original! That mustard is a bit sweet. The stark (strong) and grov (coarse) versions are too strong of taste and would bring the sauce out of balance.

[Edit: corrected 2 typo's]
« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 12:54 PM by hdv »

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #832 on: June 28, 2020, 03:46 PM »
Last night I made a broiled chicken with a lemon sauce served with broccoli and white rice.  I used the lowest rack in the oven and had the Broiler set on Hi.  I initially had it set on Lo, but it didn't seem hot enough.  In hindsight I should have just kept it on Lo.  It was supposed to cook for about 20 minutes on each side.  I only did 15 minutes skin side up and then lowered to Broil Lo and cook for 20 minutes and then took the smaller half out and cooked the larger half for an additional 15 minutes.











It came out pretty good and had a good flavor.  I poured the juice/sauce over the rice.

My wife also made homemade Korean sweet potato fries.



I picked up a few more cooking gadgets.  Thermoworks had the Mk4 on sale for Father's for only $84.15 (15% off).  I also got a Benriner mandoline and some food safe cut resistant gloves.  We have a french mandoline and it's a real pain to take out and setup.  The most frustrating part is that it's difficult to accurately set the cutting thickness.  Even a cheap Oxo has an adjustment knob with set thicknesses like 1/16", 1/8", 3/16", etc.  I'm hoping the Benriner is more user friendly.  I know I've seen a lot of professional chefs using Benriner.

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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #833 on: June 28, 2020, 07:55 PM »
The Benriner mandoline (no. 64) was smaller than I expected.  I guess I should have bought the "Super" model, which is the medium size.  In any event, it did a beautiful job of thinly slicing onions and even the par frozen beef for the pho we had for dinner.











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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #834 on: June 30, 2020, 09:56 PM »
Made homemade french fries that were cooked sous vide at 180F for 1 hour in a 1.5% brine solution and then twice cooked at 325 and then 375.  I used the pizza dough and pizza sauce recipe to attempt to make a clone of the world famous Nic-o-boli, from Nicola Pizza in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.  It wasn't as good as the real thing, but it was pretty good.  The anchovies inside really made it.





















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Online Cheese

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What's Cooking: Baked Salmon with Peach Sauce
« Reply #835 on: June 30, 2020, 11:22 PM »
Just a spur of the moment decision, wanted some salmon but didn't want the typical maple ancho pepper flavor. It's a delicious meal  but I just wanted some thing different.

Some fresh Sockeye, some fresh peaches and some fresh broccoli with a little bit of Kerrygold Irish butter.



The left over sockeye salmon was used in some scrambled eggs this morning along with a titch of the peach sauce...the sweetness of the peach sauce added something real nice to the eggs...,just don't add too much peach sauce, just a dab.  [smile]
« Last Edit: June 30, 2020, 11:28 PM by Cheese »