Author Topic: What's Cooking  (Read 80710 times)

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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #690 on: February 10, 2020, 11:11 AM »
Someone above mentioned working to perfect their technique with hash browns.  I have tried several methods but one that seems to work well for me was posted on YouTube by "Cowboy Kent Rollins".  He's worth watching just for the entertainment value but also I have picked up quite a few tips from him for a variety of recipes.

I'm planning a paella later this week.   [tongue] I'll try to remember to get pics so I can post here in the thread.

Thanks for reminding me about Kent Rollins.  I've watched some of his videos in the past.  I think I may have seen his hash brown video, but had forgotten.  I like how down to earth he is.  I really like this technique for using a coffee filter to make clarified butter.  That seems really easy.  I really like how the dehydrated Hungry Jack hash browns came out.  I bought another box and am looking forward to making them again.

Speaking of other YouTube cooks - I really like Steven Lavimoniere.  He's actually a plumber and HVAC guy, but he has several playlists of cooking videos.  He likes to say they're "how a working man cooks."  They're straightforward and no messing around recipes, which I like.  I've also learned a lot of good plumbing and HVAC information from his many videos.  I actually used one of his videos to help diagnose an AC problem I was having.  It ended up being a bad capacitor (it didn't have the common bulge/bubble, but it was still bad).

On another note, I finally managed to locate some Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt at of all places, Restaurant Depot.  I wonder if it has something to do with the region, but I checked 3 or 4 grocery stores that I usually go to don't carry the Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt.  Everywhere carries Morton Kosher Salt.  I'm now trying to figure out how to adjust my recipes since the Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt isn't as salty as Morton's.

I learned that one of the other cooking YouTubers, Phyllis Stokes that I watch passed away.  She was a heck of cook.  She also made quite a lot of old jello recipes.  I made her lime Jello with cream cheese dessert since I had both lime Jello and a bar of cream cheese.  Her orange Jelllo with cream cheese and mandarin orange recipe was excellent also!






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Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #691 on: February 16, 2020, 06:52 PM »
I'm a fan of Chef John (Food Wishes on YouTube), and get a lot of good tips and methods from his videos. I just followed his recent video "baked chicken and sausage gumbo".  In this video he has experimented with baking the roux rather than doing all the prep work on the stove. I followed his steps and it turned out nicely. The only variation was I did take it to the finish line in a large CI skillet and also used some wine to pay homage to my  first favorite video chef -- Justin Wilson.  [big grin]

It was fun to try this a different way and it freed up time to make something else that my daughter wanted.

Two pictures because in my rush to try this I forgot the obligatory bed of rice.  LOL  [eek]


Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #692 on: February 17, 2020, 09:38 AM »
It looks good Rob...how was the taste? What kind of sausage? It makes me want to make an andouille & oyster gumbo.  [smile]

Did you use okra or filé as a thickener or was it just the roux?

Well, keeping the spirit of Louisiana cooking alive, tonight I'm making Jalapeño Pie. It's a Paul Prudhomme recipe from 1991 and as typical of Paul's cooking, it contains 21 DIFFERENT ingredients. Photos tomorrow.   [wink]

Offline Cheese

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What's Cooking, Thermapen Probe with IR Sensor
« Reply #693 on: February 17, 2020, 10:25 AM »
Just purchased the new Thermapen probe with the built-in IR sensor. It's pretty slick. Nice to know the temperature of the griddle before you pour in the pancake mixture.

Last night I used it to measure the temperature of the CI pan before I put in the lamb chops, then I used the Mk4 probe part to cook the lamp chops to 135º.  Lamb chops & oven fries.  [smile]








Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 879
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #694 on: February 18, 2020, 10:51 PM »
Good evening Cheese

Man-Oh-Man look at those chops  [eek] .

I did use some file but that was near the end. Chef John's method (shown in the video) did work well and the roux was plenty thick and flavorful.  I used Italian sausage because made daily at our local butcher and also my darling wife is quite a wimp and can't handle the spicy sausage I would prefer to use.  [big grin]

I have used Okra before (I love okra), but didn't this time because the last trip to the produce aisle didn't yield good results.

We were pleased with how this method of Chef John's worked and will use it again.  Give it a try when you get a chance.  Again, my main variation from what was shown in the video was I did use quite a bit of white wine in the sauce.

Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #695 on: February 18, 2020, 11:19 PM »
Cheese, you asked a few weeks ago about paella and I've been distracted every time I plan to make it. I did find a pic in an email from a while ago.  I followed a recipe for a guy on YouTube (Chef Johnny in San Antonio TX) and ended up trading some emails with him (thus the pic in an email).

This included many "traditional" ingredients, but the one thing that I have never seen elsewhere is the use of hard-boiled eggs.  I am the only one here who likes clams, scallops and mussels, so I usually don't include them.  In the place of those shellfish I have taken to using the eggs, which appearance-wise looks pretty cool and they also taste great once they have picked up  some of the spices.

The first few batches I made didn't turn out the way I wanted because I didn't get that crusty, crunchy texture to the rice on the bottom of the skillet. But I eventually got it so I can make a pretty good batch and have it when guests are visiting.


Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 951
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #696 on: February 19, 2020, 09:40 AM »
I don't think I've ever seen a cast iron pan used to make paella.  About 10 years ago, I really wanted to buy a Mauviel paella pan like this: https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/mauviel-m250c-copper-paella-pan/.  I never ended up buying it because it would probably never be used and I got hung up on trying to find the thicker gauge version.

That's a good idea to use hard boiled eggs.  I sometimes like recipes that use ingredients that you'd never find in the "traditional" version.

I think most people (myself included) usually think of seafood paella when you think paella.  I recently learned that there's a Valencian style paella that usually has rabbit, duck, or chicken and no seafood:

There does seem to be a bit a science/technique when it comes to making rice dishes like this.  Obviously,you gotta have the correct water/broth to rice ratio, but you also have to have the heat turned up just right so that the rice full cooks but doesn't end up too wet or too starchy or too burnt on the bottom.  I made jambalaya again last night and I think I had the flame turned down a little bit too low so it came out a little wetter than I was hoping for.
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #697 on: February 20, 2020, 03:43 PM »
We did a Korean BBQ at home for Valentine's day.  It got a little bit smokey in the house.  Doing it outside would be better next time. 



Over the weekend we made hot pot since we still had the butane stove out.





One of my favorite burritos is a Don Miguel Steak and Bean burrito.   Unfortunately, it's not carried locally anymore so I tried to make my own version at home.  This is the first time ever making burritos at home.  They could have used some more spice/seasoning, but not bad.  I just used a pre-seasoned frozen sous vide steak and can of refried beans.











We ate 3 and froze 4.  I'll have to see how well they turn out when reheated from frozen.

Sunday, we made Indian.  I used some premade Tikka Masala sauce for the Chicken Tikka Masala and made an Indian Vegetable Curry based on an America's Test Kitchen recipe.  The recipe called for the canned diced tomatoes to be pureed in a food processor.  Rather than dirtying the whole food processor, I opted to use my stick blender.  Did a very nice job and less dishes!  Served with some microwaved Papadums.















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Offline Jesse Cloud

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #698 on: February 20, 2020, 05:51 PM »
Crushed corn flakes in the box are getting hard to find.  I see a million recipes for pork chops out there but a breaded corn flake crusted pork chop sautéed / pan fried in butter is better than all those.

Peter

Come on Peter, with all those tools, you must have something that could crush cornflakes!  Doesn't a Feinmaster have an attachment for that?  [big grin]
Oh I know, just drop a Systainer loaded with a big Domino on the bag and you are done!!  [cool]

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #699 on: February 21, 2020, 12:15 PM »
I did use some file but that was near the end. Chef John's method (shown in the video) did work well and the roux was plenty thick and flavorful. 

So Rob, you used the filé more as a spice rather than a thickener...interesting. I need to get back into cooking a gumbo and a paella. It's been several years already. [sad]

OK...note to self...cook a gumbo, a paella & a jambalaya.  [cool]

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 879
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #700 on: February 21, 2020, 03:09 PM »
GMW,

All of that food above looks quite tasty  [tongue] .  I do like Indian food although we only get it when in-laws come to visit.  The mother of one of my son's former teammates is from India and she used to bring some mouth-watering stuff over for us.

I have been thinking about buying a "traditional" paella pan, but not sure if it will yield any better results than the cast iron skillet.

Are you near a Harris Teeter? They have salmon on sale this week and last night we had a perfect piece of salmon for dinner. 

Cheese

Yes, the File was just for a bit of taste enhancement.  That method described by Chef John really worked well.  I have to admit in times past I have had a bit of a problem getting a roux to turn out just right, so I was plenty pleased to find this method.

Speaking of Jambalaya....  [big grin] [big grin]

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 951
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #701 on: February 21, 2020, 03:21 PM »
Thanks Rob.

Authentic Indian food is definitely tastier and spicier than the stuff I've made.

Yup, there are a couple of Harris Teeters near me.  I don't shop there very often though.  Thanks for the heads up on the salmon!

Don't forget, next Tuesday is Mardi Gras!  Perfect time to make lots of cajun/creole food.  Last year I had live crawfish delivered.  I don't think we're gonna do that this year.  Maybe just make some gumbo and/or BBQ shrimp.

I also really wanna make Swedish Meatballs.  I think it's going to be hard to find lingonberries though.
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Offline Cheese

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What's Cooking, Jalapeño Pie
« Reply #702 on: February 23, 2020, 11:18 AM »
Getting back to the Louisiana food theme, this is a Paul Prudhomme recipe from 1991. Twenty-one different ingredients but it's worth the effort.

Here are 7 Jalapeños, 7 New Mexico's and a yellow onion ready to sauté...before & after.






The final product baked in a CI skillet then served with a very large dollop of sour cream and some cilantro. The brown crust on the top is white cheddar which along with the sour cream removes some of the heat.




Here's a view of the center. The toasted cornmeal crust on the bottom rises up because of the baking powder and also contains brown sugar which contrasts nicely with the heat and also tames it a bit. The egg center contains the peppers & onion.

Call it a frittata or a quiche it's a wonderful tasting egg dish that even my 96 year old mother likes...I brought her over a slice last week and she ate it cold.  [eek]





« Last Edit: February 24, 2020, 08:18 AM by Cheese »

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 951
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #703 on: February 23, 2020, 11:50 AM »
Were the jalapenos spicy? 

I've had some jalapenos that had about the heat of a bell pepper and then occasionally you get some are "blow your mind" spicy.

Last night I made Swedish Meatballs.  I combined two different recipes that I had seen.  Turned out pretty good.  We also made some sous vide bread and butter pickles as a side and mashed potatoes.  I tried a different technique and boiled the whole yukon gold potatoes in heavily salted water.  Normally I always cube up the potatoes and boil in plain, unsalted water and season the potatoes after I've riced them.  I kinda liked this technique.















As I expected, I couldn't find any whole frozen lingonberries, but I did manage to find 2 different jars of lingonberry sauce/jam.  The lingonberries tasted to me just like cranberry sauce.  I wasn't really worth the trouble of finding or the cost.  The lingonberry sauce was $8.99!





This morning I made corned beef hash with an over easy egg and a slice of toast.





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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #704 on: February 24, 2020, 08:49 AM »

1. Were the jalapenos spicy? 

2. Last night I made Swedish Meatballs.   

3. As I expected, I couldn't find any whole frozen lingonberries, but I did manage to find 2 different jars of lingonberry sauce/jam.  The lingonberries tasted to me just like cranberry sauce.  I wasn't really worth the trouble of finding or the cost.

4. I tried a different technique and boiled the whole yukon gold potatoes in heavily salted water.  Normally I always cube up the potatoes and boil in plain, unsalted water and season the potatoes after I've riced them.  I kinda liked this technique.

5. This morning I made corned beef hash with an over easy egg and a slice of toast.


1. The jalapeños are just slightly hot because the seeds & membranes have been removed. It's that slight heat at the back of your throat contrasted with the sweetness of the corn meal & brown sugar crust and the sour cream. 

2. The Swedish meatballs look delicious, just the way I remember them. What's the sauce on the meatballs & potatoes?

3. I needed some lingonberry jam for a recipe. Found it at the local grocer...made in France...$9.99...tasted like cranberries.
Then I found some lingonberry jam at Williams Sonoma...made in Italy...$14.99...tasted like cranberries.
I'll not travel that path again. [smile]

4. I like to cut the potatoes into quarters and then boil in heavily salted water, it's easy & quick to cook.

5. The corned beef hash & egg looks delicious. I've never cooked that but I think I'm going to try it.

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 879
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #705 on: February 24, 2020, 08:59 AM »
Wow, I love corned beef hash with an egg on top! My mom used to make that all the time when I was a kid.  [smile]

Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #706 on: February 24, 2020, 09:07 AM »
Sometimes, something simple is very good and satisfying  [big grin] .  Working at my desk yesterday, and Mrs. Z delivered this to me. [eek]   With the bonus slice of ham included !  [big grin]

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 951
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #707 on: February 24, 2020, 09:12 AM »
1. The jalapeños are just slightly hot because the seeds & membranes have been removed. It's that slight heat at the back of your throat contrasted with the sweetness of the corn meal & brown sugar crust and the sour cream. 

2. The Swedish meatballs look delicious, just the way I remember them. What's the sauce on the meatballs & potatoes?

3. I needed some lingonberry jam for a recipe. Found it at the local grocer...made in France...$9.99...tasted like cranberries.
Then I found some lingonberry jam at Williams Sonoma...made in Italy...$14.99...tasted like cranberries.
I'll not travel that path again. [smile]

4. I like to cut the potatoes into quarters and then boil in heavily salted water, it's easy & quick to cook.

5. The corned beef hash & egg looks delicious. I've never cooked that but I think I'm going to try it.


1. Ah, you removed the "good" parts of the jalapeno [wink].

2. This was the first time ever making Swedish meatballs.  The sauce is just the remnants of the canola oil used to fry the meatballs, the fat/juice from the meatballs themselves, some butter, and finally heavy cream.  One of the recipes I saw made the gravy from 4 cups of veal stock and 2 cups of heavy cream.  That seemed like a lot of extra work whereas the other recipe just pan the pan sauce from the drippings and heavy cream.

3. I kinda wished I had done a bit more research on what exactly lingonberries tasted like.  On the other hand, I might have read other's descriptions as "cranberry" and probably not believed it until I tried it myself.  I wonder if frozen whole berries taste any different - I suspect they most likely taste just like a cranberry.

4.  The whole potatoes (albeit were on the small size) surprisingly only took about 20-22 minutes to cook through.  I might have actually slightly over cooked them as some of them split in half and fell apart as I was using a fork to transfer the cooked potato into the ricer.  I do really like the idea of cooking in salted water.  I think that seasons the potatoes more than just adding salt at the end.  That should have been obvious to me as I always insist on seasoning a soup broth at the beginning versus adding salt at the very end.  I also always cook my pasta in very heavily salted water.

5. We always buy Mary Kitchen Corned Beef Hash: https://www.amazon.com/Hormel-Mary-Kitchen-Corned-Hash/dp/B07GG7FNZW/ref=sr_1_1_sspa.  It's much better than Libby's in my opinion.  For some reason the corned beef hash at home never tastes like the generic kind served at most diners.  This is sorta like my quest to find the same tasting cottage cheese that you find on salad bars.  I've even bought the large industrial sized can of corned beef hoping it would taste the same as a diner, but alas it didn't.

Wow, I love corned beef hash with an egg on top! My mom used to make that all the time when I was a kid.  [smile]

Having the yolk run on top of the corned beef hash is the best!

Sometimes, something simple is very good and satisfying  [big grin] .  Working at my desk yesterday, and Mrs. Z delivered this to me. [eek]   With the bonus slice of ham included !  [big grin]

Is that a grilled cheese and ham sandwich?  What kind of cheese is that?  The way it's melted looks amazing.
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Offline Rob Z

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #708 on: February 24, 2020, 09:23 AM »
GMW,  Yes, that is a grilled ham and cheese, or "toastie" as our friends in the UK call it. [big grin]

I just went to kitchen to check but it looks like the package of cheese was finished. I think it was Boars Head cheddar. That bread is a brioche that HT carries. It makes amazingly tasty grilled cheeses and also French toast .

HT has ribs on sale so Mrs. Z loaded up yesterday. I need to buy some more lump charcoal for my Primo so we can have ribs later this week.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 7012
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #709 on: February 24, 2020, 09:28 AM »

That bread is a brioche that HT carries. It makes amazingly tasty grilled cheeses and also French toast .


The brioche for French toast would really be amazing.


Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 662
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #710 on: February 24, 2020, 10:12 AM »
Costco Filet's for daughter's fifth birthday



St. Louis style ribs last night for family:



Chicken wings last week for weeknight dinner, Bad Byron's BBQ rub and tossed in Nando's Medium sauce to finish:



Costco brats and peppers for a weeknight meal:


« Last Edit: February 24, 2020, 10:16 AM by DynaGlide »
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Online Gregor

  • Posts: 1586
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #711 on: February 24, 2020, 02:15 PM »
Costco Filet's for daughter's fifth birthday
St. Louis style ribs last night for family:
Chicken wings last week for weeknight dinner, Bad Byron's BBQ rub and tossed in Nando's Medium sauce to finish:
Costco brats and peppers for a weeknight meal:
For some reason I got hungry 30 seconds ago...

4.  The whole potatoes (albeit were on the small size) surprisingly only took about 20-22 minutes to cook through.  I might have actually slightly over cooked them as some of them split in half and fell apart as I was using a fork to transfer the cooked potato into the ricer.  I do really like the idea of cooking in salted water.  I think that seasons the potatoes more than just adding salt at the end.  That should have been obvious to me as I always insist on seasoning a soup broth at the beginning versus adding salt at the very end.  I also always cook my pasta in very heavily salted water.
I cook skinned potatoes in salt water, while whole ones (to peel after cook - or eat as-is for fresh/young ones that have soft skin) get to bath in unsalted water that is laced with caraway and some rough ground pepper.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 951
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #712 on: February 24, 2020, 02:35 PM »
I cook skinned potatoes in salt water, while whole ones (to peel after cook - or eat as-is for fresh/young ones that have soft skin) get to bath in unsalted water that is laced with caraway and some rough ground pepper.

Is there a difference between peeling before cooking versus after cooking in terms of taste/texture?  I normally peel before because it's easier and faster - don't have to wait for the potato to cool before peeling and/or having the cooked potato start to crumble in your hands.
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Offline mike_aa

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #713 on: February 24, 2020, 03:28 PM »
@GoingMyWay  @Cheese   Have you tried IKEA Lingonberry Jam?  It's what they serve at the store with their Swedish Meatball Platter.

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/p/sylt-lingon-lingonberry-preserves-organic-10308626/

Smaklig måltid!

Mike A.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 951
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #714 on: February 24, 2020, 03:33 PM »
I guess I tried some of Ikea's lingonberry jam when I ate there, but that was 5.5 years ago so I don't remember what it tasted like really.  The closest Ikea is over 20 miles away so I we don't go there very often.

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Online Gregor

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #715 on: February 24, 2020, 07:52 PM »
Let's see: lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) translates to Preiselbeere in german, translating it back we're at the choices of:

cowberry [BOT.]   
lingonberry [BOT.]   
mountain cranberry [BOT.]   
lowbush cranberry [BOT.]

Pick one. All are tasty to meats when you want it sweater and fruity, whatever name you call it (because they're basically the same plant).

Is there a difference between peeling before cooking versus after cooking in terms of taste/texture?  I normally peel before because it's easier and faster - don't have to wait for the potato to cool before peeling and/or having the cooked potato start to crumble in your hands.
Sure there is, cooking them peeled bleeds them taste wise.

I would suggest to chat with a potato guy at your local farmers market, a good one will have more variety than 'potatoes' - not only in size and firmness but also in taste. You might be surprised should you usually only use the industry kind (which IMHO is bland and uninteresting).

To peel them after cooking make a cut around their waist pre-boiling and quench them in ice/cold water for just some seconds afterwards:

I suggest to not let them sit in the ice/cold water, 5-10 seconds exposure should be enough given quality potatoes.

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #716 on: February 24, 2020, 08:37 PM »
Have you tried IKEA Lingonberry Jam?  It's what they serve at the store with their Swedish Meatball Platter.

So @mike_aa .........does it still taste like cranberries?  [poke] [poke]

Offline mike_aa

  • Posts: 1128
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #717 on: February 25, 2020, 03:00 PM »
Have you tried IKEA Lingonberry Jam?  It's what they serve at the store with their Swedish Meatball Platter.

So @mike_aa .........does it still taste like cranberries?  [poke] [poke]
@Cheese   Jeeez, I dunno!  It tastes good to me, but I don't have the same discerning taste buds as all you aficionado cooks!  [not worthy]

Mike A.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3738
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #718 on: February 27, 2020, 03:44 AM »
>>>Sure there is, cooking them peeled bleeds them taste wise.<<< quote from @Gregor about potatoes.
I agree.  We never peel potatoes before cooking. I grew up on a farm in the Massachusetts Berkshires. We raised all of our veggies in the family garden, including our potatoes. The early "spuds" (Irish Cobblers) were very thin skinned and melted in our mouths. They were very small and tender, but with a lot of taste. Our late potatoes were much larger (Green Mountain) which were stored in the root cellar. Those, after a winters storage, we used to peel before cooking. In the earlier winter, we never peeled. The skins were left on whenever we baked them. We scooped the insides out, mashed them with our forks and covered with butter, gravy or other vegetables. The  skins, we would load with butter (I still do) and once the butter melts (very quickly) we just eat along with the rest of the meal. Hold the skins with our fingers and try not to let the butter dribble to much.
Tinker
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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 951
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #719 on: March 04, 2020, 05:17 PM »
I tried making pickled eggs for the first time, two different ways.  The dyed eggs with beets have a very mild flavor (only used 1/4 cup of vinegar). 







The other jar is too sour as the liquid is 100% vinegar.









Are there any other pickled egg fans out there?
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