Author Topic: What's Cooking  (Read 64424 times)

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Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #390 on: February 07, 2019, 02:11 PM »
Hi Cheese,

The Sauce is a Honey-Dill-Mustard Sauce.

Fish was: Angler-Fish, Sole, Gilthead, Catfish and a Scampi.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #391 on: February 07, 2019, 05:38 PM »
A slow cooker is great for...think about it...it’s coming up... corned beef for March 17th.

They’re also good for stews, chili’s and my fav...beef bourguignon. Anything that needs to “stew in it’s own juices” is a good candidate.

Some people have bragged about baking a cake in a slow cooker...but that’s certainly not my thing.

Just as as side note to this, Corned Beef can be made sous vide.  Here is a great link for those who like the science of it all (it does take longer than in a crock pot slow cooker BUT you can select the doneness you desire):  https://www.seriouseats.com/2011/03/how-to-make-corned-beef-st-patricks-day-simmering-brisket-meat-the-food-lab.html

Peter
« Last Edit: February 07, 2019, 05:40 PM by Peter Halle »

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #392 on: February 07, 2019, 10:59 PM »

The Sauce is a Honey-Dill-Mustard Sauce.

Fish was: Angler-Fish, Sole, Gilthead, Catfish and a Scampi.


Thanks Oliver, it's always interesting to experience different cuisines from different worlds.  [big grin] The green sauce contrasts nicely with the salmon.  [smile] Looks delicious. I wonder what gives it the green color? Parsley possibly?

That looked like raw salmon or is it a ceviche? Producing a ceviche has been on my priority list for the last 4-5 years now.  [tongue]

Angler-fish & gilt head...I'm unfamiliar with both.  [tongue]

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking: St. Patty's Day
« Reply #393 on: February 08, 2019, 12:10 AM »
Just as an aside to this, Corned Beef can be made sous vide.  Here is a great link for those who like the science of it all (it does take longer than in a crock pot slow cooker BUT you can select the doneness you desire): 

Great article Peter...I haven't finished reading it yet because of all the side ways elements contained within, but I will.  [smile]

My ears really perked up with the reference to Jewish and Irish families living side by side because that's also been my experience.  [big grin]

I'll also throw the Italians into that mix because that was the way it was locally 80-90 years ago...a true melting pot. [thumbs up]

That's the Essence (thank you Emeril) that's made us such a great country.

Different thoughts...different methods...but the same final product/goal.

Rather like this conversation as a matter of fact.  [smile]

So, speaking about corned beef and March 17th...can you tell that I'm Irish?

My biggest St. Patties no-no is to take the cabbage, carrots & potatoes and throw them into the corned beef. I did that for years, and I hated the results for years until I decided to just think through the situation.

Corned beef in a slow cooker (or any cooker for that matter) renders the fat from the meat very slowly over hours of time. Where does that fat gravitate to?...the vegetables. So if you want your cabbage to be greasy & taste like corned beef, if you want your carrots to be greasy and taste like corned beef and if you want your potatoes to be greasy and taste like corned beef, then by all means, just throw them in with the corned beef.

So over the years, I've learned to cook my vegetables separately from the corned beef and the taste is amazing. Vegetables with subtle flavors need to taste like vegetables while corned beef with it's in-your-face flavor needs to be the star of the show.

A second suggestion is to purchase a flat cut corned beef or a Waygu eye of round corned beef. Both shrink less than a typical corned beef brisket.

I'll also add a couple of bottles of Shiner's Bock or Guiness to the slow cooker to add a little pizazz. Then I obviously need to consume what's left of the beer to make sure it's not spoiled.  [smile]

Here's a shot of last years celebration before I added a few potatoes and carrots. This happens to be a Waygu eye of round.Notice how lean it is yet it's not dry at all, just very moist.




« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 10:10 AM by Cheese »

Offline Tinker

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #394 on: February 08, 2019, 04:32 AM »
quote>>>Great article Peter...I haven't finished reading it yet because of all the side ways elements contained within, but I will.  [smile]

My ears really perked up with the reference to Jewish and Irish families living side by side because that's also been my experience.  [big grin]

I'll also throw the Italians into that mix because that was the way it was locally 80-90 years ago...a true melting pot. [thumbs up]

That's the Essence (thank you Emeril) that's made us such a great country.

Different thoughts...different methods...but the same final product/goal.

Rather like this conversation as a matter of fact. <<<quote

When I was 8 years old, my brother and I were shipped off to stay with my father's uncle and cousin for two weeks while Mom and Dad sorted out their differences. We ended up staying with the cousins for six years of the best life that ever happened to me. The uncle and aunt were very active in the church (Congregational) and the cousin was the type who just about any kids were welcome into her family. At one time, her son and I (who grew up as best friends)counted up the number who had been "dropped off" and had become part of her family. We got to between 50 and 60 and stopped counting. During the periods of our stay and others with the same good fortune, Mary, my dad's cousin, took each kid to his or her church. We grew up going to Protestent churches all denominations, Catholic, Jewish services and even Seventh Day Adventists and Jehovahs Witnesses. A couple from India stayed with us for a couple of weeks. I think they were Budists. They conducted their own services and some of us kids attended. Eventually, I decided that since I almost always fell asleep during any service, i would not go to church anymore. I did go to my cousin's grandfather and help him with his Sunday chores. (he was a small dairy farmer) I learned a lot about other folks ways during those years.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #395 on: February 08, 2019, 10:19 AM »
Eventually, I decided that since I almost always fell asleep during any service, i would not go to church anymore. I did go to my cousin's grandfather and help him with his Sunday chores. (he was a small dairy farmer) I learned a lot about other folks ways during those years.

That's funny... [big grin]

My grandparents on both sides of the family are 1st Gen born Americans. When their parents made the great voyage to America they all settled in an area known as the levee. The space was tight but the housing was affordable. They'd borrow and use each other's clothes lines to hang their laundry out to dry. Automobiles didn't yet exist. Electricity didn't exist. One of my great, great uncles was a lamp lighter while another sold rags in the downtown area out of the back of a horse drawn wagon.

Jews, Germans, Italians, Austrians, Irish and then add in the odd Swede, Bohemian or Czech. They all grew together as friends, started businesses, raised families and eventually purchased their own homes. It was the beginning of the America we know today.

As you said Tinker, you can learn a lot from other people.  [big grin]

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #396 on: February 10, 2019, 08:42 AM »
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...


4 lb. store bought corned brisket


Start time


180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #397 on: February 10, 2019, 09:40 AM »
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.


So this will be interesting. [popcorn] [popcorn] [popcorn]

You're right Peter, whether an apple pie or corned beef, the smell does make a difference.  [smile]

Offline Tinker

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #398 on: February 10, 2019, 12:12 PM »
All this talk about the smells, as I look (drool) over all the wonderful pics in this discussion, all the great roasts and desserts, I can just smell all the goodness. I love the smell of my wife's cooking. As I am watching TV in the other room, or doing bookkeeping right in the same room where a meal is cooking, I just love the smells coming from the stove.  Suddenly, the smell of burning wax starts to invade. I no longer need to investigate. After nearly 53 years of wedded bliss, I now know the source. My wife thinks the smell of cooking is an assault to the senses and she lights candles all around the kitchen and living room to hide those smells. Those candles remind me of the days when my mom's house had the kerosene stove for cooking. I even prefer the smell of burning good food to the odor of that old kerosene stove. The first thing we did once we got electricity into Mom's house was to get rid of the kerosene cookstove and get an electric stove. That was even before we got the refrigerator to replace the Ice Box. My problem now is I just don't want to replace my wife. I will just have to put up with those (expletive) candles.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #399 on: February 10, 2019, 12:20 PM »
@Tinker , I admit that I am old enough to remember the colder days of the 1970's and 1980's and was a witness to efforts taken to stay warm by those who used fuel oil to heat their homes.  Kerosene space heaters became common in the US.  The stench of a kerosene heater running out of fuel or being turned off is one not to be forgotten.

Glad those days are behind me.

Peter

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #400 on: February 10, 2019, 12:26 PM »
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.


So this will be interesting. [popcorn] [popcorn] [popcorn]

You're right Peter, whether an apple pie or corned beef, the smell does make a difference.  [smile]

Speaking of smells, if there are people out there who like the taste of cabbage but can't stand the smell of cooking cabbage, there are numerous suggestions out on the internet.  Vinegar, lemon juice, vinegar in a bowl, walnuts, baking, etc.

Also you can try savoy cabbage instead of the cheapest green cabbage.

Peter

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #401 on: February 11, 2019, 11:11 AM »
Saturday my wife made Vietnamese beef stew (bo kho). It didn't turn out too good.  It was too salty and there was a bit of an aftertaste.  She thinks the aftertaste is because she burnt the beef stew seasoning when she was trying to toast it.






Sunday we made wonton noodle soup.













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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #402 on: February 15, 2019, 09:48 AM »
For Valentine's Day I made a small ~8oz Wagyu ribeye steak, a regular ribeye, and a lobster tail with sauteeed bok choy and a baked potato.  I used the America's Test Kitchen Technique of poking some holes in the potato and then dipping into salt water and cooking in a 450 degree oven until the internal temperature reached 205 degrees.



The steaks were cooked sous vide at 135 degrees (normally I always cook steaks at 124 degrees ) and and the lobster tail was cooked at 140 degrees.  The lobster tail was very disappointing.  The texture was odd and really needed seasoning.  I didn't preseason since I didn't think much would penetrate through the shell.























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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #403 on: February 15, 2019, 11:35 PM »
So 1 question and 1 statement...

What were your thoughts on the Waygu?

My go-to recipe for baked potatoes is:
Wash & scrub the potato clean of all dirt and let dry
Oil the outside lightly with EVOO
Dust with kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper
Bake in an oven at 350º for 45-60 minutes

If you like crispy/blackened potato skins (I do) bake for 30 minutes in the oven and then finish on the grill over hot coals.


Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #404 on: February 16, 2019, 09:06 AM »
So 1 question and 1 statement...

What were your thoughts on the Waygu?

My go-to recipe for baked potatoes is:
Wash & scrub the potato clean of all dirt and let dry
Oil the outside lightly with EVOO
Dust with kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper
Bake in an oven at 350º for 45-60 minutes

If you like crispy/blackened potato skins (I do) bake for 30 minutes in the oven and then finish on the grill over hot coals.

That sounds very good! But (exposing my ignorance again) what is EVOO?

Offline rvieceli

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #405 on: February 16, 2019, 09:14 AM »
EVOO = Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Ron

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #406 on: February 16, 2019, 09:18 AM »
That sounds very good! But (exposing my ignorance again) what is EVOO?

Sorry Michael  [tongue]  That's Rachael Ray speak for Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Ya for me the potato skins are the best part of the potato, they contain all the nutritional goodness. Break open the potato, place some butter inside and let it melt. Then cut pieces of the potato so that you get some of the soft inside while also some of the crisp skin. The additional fresh black pepper and kosher salt baked onto the skin of the potato adds just a little pop.

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #407 on: February 16, 2019, 09:35 AM »
A decade ago or so I built a set for a tv show on a stage right next to Rachel Ray’s stage so I got to watch her work occasionally. She’s good and her crew was happy.

Crispy seasoned potato skin is delicious, I know that much, but we’re pretty specialized at my house. I dont work in the kitchen (except at the sink and dishwasher) and my wife stays out of the shop.

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #408 on: February 16, 2019, 10:33 AM »
So 1 question and 1 statement...

What were your thoughts on the Waygu?

My go-to recipe for baked potatoes is:
Wash & scrub the potato clean of all dirt and let dry
Oil the outside lightly with EVOO
Dust with kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper
Bake in an oven at 350º for 45-60 minutes

If you like crispy/blackened potato skins (I do) bake for 30 minutes in the oven and then finish on the grill over hot coals.

It was good.  Very rich!  I think the Kobe Beef I had in Kobe, Japan was better, but the chef was doing the cooking right in front of us.  The Wagyu might have been better if I just quickly seared it in a pan instead of cooking sous vide, but I was a little afraid of overcooking it since it's so thin.  I'd definitely buy it again if it's available.  I have been thinking about this Wagyu since I first saw back in September.

I used to always just microwave the potato but the exact timing was hit or miss.  For some reason I always find that a baked potato at a restaurant always tastes better than what I make at home.  I found a recipe for "steakhouse style" baked potatoes.  That said to rub the outside with oil and sprinkle with salt and bake at 425 degrees.    It still wasn't as good as the baked potato at Outback!

I also HATE potato skins.  I know it's the most nutritious part and people love it, but I really dislike potato skins.  I always have to ask at restaurants if the potatoes in the mashed potatoes are peeled, or in like a potato soup.  I'll often cut the skins off of home fried potatoes is they're not peeled.  I am able to tolerate the little bit of skins on french fries, like Boardwalk Fries.
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Offline Tinker

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #409 on: February 16, 2019, 01:32 PM »
A decade ago or so I built a set for a tv show on a stage right next to Rachel Ray’s stage so I got to watch her work occasionally. She’s good and her crew was happy.

Crispy seasoned potato skin is delicious, I know that much, but we’re pretty specialized at my house. I dont work in the kitchen (except at the sink and dishwasher) and my wife stays out of the shop.

Ditto and ditto
Tinker
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #410 on: March 03, 2019, 08:13 AM »
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

(Attachment Link)
4 lb. store bought corned brisket

(Attachment Link)
Start time

(Attachment Link)
180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter

  Sooooo Pete, how did the corned beef taste using the sous vide method?
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #411 on: March 03, 2019, 08:39 AM »
For Valentine's Day I made a small ~8oz Wagyu ribeye steak, a regular ribeye, and a lobster tail with sauteeed bok choy and a baked potato.  I used the America's Test Kitchen Technique of poking some holes in the potato and then dipping into salt water and cooking in a 450 degree oven until the internal temperature reached 205 degrees.

(Attachment Link)

The steaks were cooked sous vide at 135 degrees (normally I always cook steaks at 124 degrees ) and and the lobster tail was cooked at 140 degrees.  The lobster tail was very disappointing.  The texture was odd and really needed seasoning.  I didn't preseason since I didn't think much would penetrate through the shell.

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

  So many fascinating foods and recipes in this thread!Hate to ask, but how much is that Wagyu beef cost per lb?
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #412 on: March 03, 2019, 08:47 AM »
The Wagyu was $124.99/lb, so my little steak was $56.87.

I didn't think that was too outrageous, at least compared to some of the prices of Wagyu I had seen online that were delivered to your house (I think in most cases you had to pay for overnight delivery).
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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking: Chicken Divan
« Reply #413 on: March 03, 2019, 11:23 AM »
I've meant to post this for the last couple of days but keep forgetting.

This is a Paula Dean recipe...Chicken Divan.

A delicious dinner for the winter.  [big grin]

Chicken and broccoli in a sherry cream sauce with some provolone and Reggiano over the top and sprinkled with Marcona almonds.

« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 10:09 AM by Cheese »

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #414 on: March 03, 2019, 12:01 PM »
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

(Attachment Link)
4 lb. store bought corned brisket

(Attachment Link)
Start time

(Attachment Link)
180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter

  Sooooo Pete, how did the corned beef taste using the sous vide method?

The corned beef was good.  Flavors were more concentrated - maybe that would be off-putting to some - because it is not being diluted in a water or beer bath.  Next time I will follow the receipt and do it according to the recipe and refrigerate it after cooking so that the juices can be re-absorbed.  In other words it was a little drier than I would have expected, but in the end it worked out great for my rustic sandwiches.

Peter 

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #415 on: March 06, 2019, 04:19 PM »
On Saturday we made spring rolls (I believe most restaurants call them summer rolls for some reason) and some eggrolls.  We also made some fried silver fish patties.  I forgot to take a picture of the fish by themselves, but they're tiny!  They actually tasted really good and I normally don't like fish because I always manage to find a bone.















For Mardi Gras yesterday,  I ordered 5 lbs of live crawfish and we made our version of a crawfish boil.









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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking: Tuna Steak Burgers with a Beet Salad
« Reply #416 on: March 07, 2019, 10:55 AM »
On Saturday we made spring rolls (I believe most restaurants call them summer rolls for some reason) and some eggrolls.

For Mardi Gras yesterday,  I ordered 5 lbs of live crawfish and we made our version of a crawfish boil.

The spring rolls look delicious. I'm hungry for some.  [cool]

I've never seen 5# of mud bugs, let alone 5# of live mud bugs. Is there a large difference in flavor between fresh & frozen?


Last night I fixed fresh tuna steak burgers on toasted buns and a fresh beet salad. I like to spread a little Sir Kensington's Special Sauce (flavored mayo) on the bun with a little arugula.

The salad has beets, romaine hearts, red grapes, goat cheese with honey and is sprinkled with EVOO and a peach balsamic vinegar while Marcona almonds are scattered over the top.

« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 10:09 AM by Cheese »

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #417 on: March 07, 2019, 12:11 PM »
They were good.  I'm not a very good roller though.  A lot of times my rolls either come out too fat or not tight enough.  It doesn't really matter to me though since it's fast to eat and just roll another.

Funny you should ask.  I feel like the fresh ones have juicier heads.  Now having said that, our favorite place to get crawfish is Hot and Juicy (they have a couple locations around the country).  I believe most of the time their crawfish are frozen and not fresh.  I can't really tell a difference because the juice/broth that they cook everything in tastes so good.

That's a very healthy looking meal you have!  Was the tuna steak cooked all the way through or was it medium rare in the middle?  I only like my tuna raw, or broken up in tuna salad.
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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking: Citrus Herbed baked Chicken
« Reply #418 on: March 08, 2019, 09:45 AM »
Was the tuna steak cooked all the way through or was it medium rare in the middle?  I only like my tuna raw, or broken up in tuna salad.

In a hot cast iron grill pan, cook tuna 2 minutes, rotate 60º to 90º, cook 1 minute, flip tuna and cook 2 minutes, rotate and cook 1 minute.

The 2+1 method always yields med rare to medium tuna depending upon the thickness.

FWIW...I just came across a recipe for citrus herb baked salmon that I'm going to try. I've done citrus herb baked chicken many times and it is delicious. It's especially good cold the next day sliced thick for sandwiches. Here's a photo of how it starts out.



« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 10:08 AM by Cheese »

Offline Mike Goetzke

  • Posts: 341
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #419 on: March 08, 2019, 10:53 AM »
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

(Attachment Link)
4 lb. store bought corned brisket

(Attachment Link)
Start time

(Attachment Link)
180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter

Nice! I'm going to try this.

FYI - I recently bought a Coleman 24 can Party Stacker Cooler and punched a hole in the top for sous.