Author Topic: What's Cooking  (Read 65681 times)

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Offline six-point socket II

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  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #360 on: January 01, 2019, 09:42 AM »
Happy New Year everyone! :)

Your pizza looks fantastic @GoingMyWay !!

--

Starter: Escargot, main course: confit Goose legs with potato croquettes and baked apples/oranges  + cranberries







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 885
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #361 on: January 01, 2019, 09:58 AM »
I have never had success with pizza on the grill using a stone.  Even when using my Bubba Keg (poor man's version of an egg).  For grilled pizza I use basically this recipe and technique:  https://barbecuebible.com/recipe/grilled-pizza/

For pizza in the oven I use Chef John's Wolfgang Puck recipe that I think was referenced here before.  We don't get as perfect a crust but we prefer more sauce and MORE CHEESE.  And other stuff.

Peter

DOH!  I wish I had thought things through a little longer before I bought the Weber pizza stone.  Oh well, I guess I can also use it in the oven (assuming I can scrape all the burnt stuff off).  Good thing I didn't also buy another pizza stone I saw on Amazon.

I hear that the Kettle Pizza is supposed to get you pretty close to a wood fired brick pizza oven, but the cost is a little high and it's also kind of a big contraption that won't get very much use.

We had used America's Test Kitchens's pizza recipe before for cooking in the oven.  We found that it was just best as cheese pizza because the toppings tended to just ooze out water and then the top wouldn't really cook properly.

Your pizza looks fantastic @GoingMyWay !!

Thanks Oliver!  The crust came out nice and chewy!

Your escargot look great.  You even have the shell holder and the little fork!

Last night my wife made nabeyaki udon and buffalo and fish sauce wings.  We made peach cobbler for dessert and rang in the New Year with some Champagne from Costco.

















Happy New Year!!
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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6519
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #362 on: January 01, 2019, 11:13 AM »
DOH!  I wish I had thought things through a little longer before I bought the Weber pizza stone.  Oh well, I guess I can also use it in the oven (assuming I can scrape all the burnt stuff off). 

I have an All Clad pizza stone that I use in the oven year round. After a year or so of usage it collects bits of cheese, olive oil, pepperoni grease, tomato sauce, corn meal...you name it. It all gets baked into a nasty hard mass on the soapstone. I just pull out a Festool sander and place 60/80/100 grit Granat on it and sand the stuff off. It usually takes 2 pieces of Granat to remove all the gunk. It works well. [big grin]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 1041
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #363 on: January 01, 2019, 02:22 PM »
And todays dinner on New Years Day. :smile:

French/ Parisian onion soup



Venison ragout on Spätzle





Jelly roll.



Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 885
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #364 on: January 02, 2019, 10:04 AM »
Last night, for New Year's Day we made black eyed peas with collard greens and corn bread.









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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #365 on: January 03, 2019, 06:35 PM »
DOH!  I wish I had thought things through a little longer before I bought the Weber pizza stone.  Oh well, I guess I can also use it in the oven (assuming I can scrape all the burnt stuff off). 

I have an All Clad pizza stone that I use in the oven year round. After a year or so of usage it collects bits of cheese, olive oil, pepperoni grease, tomato sauce, corn meal...you name it. It all gets baked into a nasty hard mass on the soapstone. I just pull out a Festool sander and place 60/80/100 grit Granat on it and sand the stuff off. It usually takes 2 pieces of Granat to remove all the gunk. It works well. [big grin]

I believe the Weber pizza stone is made out of cordierite stone.  I wonder if that can also be sanded with Granat.  When you say it usually takes 2 pieces of Granat, do you mean 2 different grits or you actually have to change the paper because it's clogged?
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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #366 on: January 03, 2019, 09:51 PM »
When you say it usually takes 2 pieces of Granat, do you mean 2 different grits or you actually have to change the paper because it's clogged?

The grunge on the pizza stone plugs up the sandpaper pretty quickly. That’s the reason I went from a 2-3 year maintenance schedule to a yearly schedule.  Try using 80 grit and then go from there.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 885
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #367 on: January 05, 2019, 10:12 PM »
Oooh.  I'm still kinda scared to take a power sander to a pizza stone.  For now, I just scraped the one we keep in the oven with a cooking bench scraper.  Even just the bench scraper seemed to take some of the top finish off. especially at the edge.  Maybe I can try the Weber pizza stone since that's practically brand new, I have no "attachment" to it.

Tonight we made spaghetti and meatballs with "house salad."















P.S. I downloaded and bought the Desktop and Android version of the Paprika App.  It is pretty slick, especially the recipe scaling.  Now, hopefully I'll input all the printed out recipes we have laying around (including handwritten modifications)!!
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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #368 on: January 06, 2019, 09:14 AM »
Oooh.  I'm still kinda scared to take a power sander to a pizza stone.  For now, I just scraped the one we keep in the oven with a cooking bench scraper.  Even just the bench scraper seemed to take some of the top finish off. especially at the edge. 

P.S. I downloaded and bought the Desktop and Android version of the Paprika App.  It is pretty slick, especially the recipe scaling.  Now, hopefully I'll input all the printed out recipes we have laying around (including handwritten modifications)!!

I'm curious what type of finish is on the stone, is it an anti-stick? The stones I'm familiar with are just plain.

Paprika:
The recipe scaling is really slick. I also like the pin feature. I've pinned 3 recipes at once and can just flip flop between the 3 as I'm cooking different courses.

Remember you can also add multiple photos to a single recipe. So if I'm cooking something in layers, think a layered pasta dish, I can take a photo of each layer and add them to the recipe while still keeping the finished food item as the main photo.

Keep up your enthusiastic attitude towards adding printed recipes to Paprika...It's been 3-4 years for me and I'm still finding scraps of paper around the house with recipes/directions/corrections scribbled on them.  [big grin]

Beef, pork & veal for the meatballs?

Can you believe that I've only made home made meatballs 3 or 4 times...EVER!!  They're so delicious but they just take so long. I have 2 Italian neighbors, one from Rome & one from Brooklyn. In the summer I can always tell when they're making meatballs. That wonderful aroma starts around 10:00 AM and doesn't quit until 6:00 or 7:00.

The salad makes me hungry even at 7:30 AM.  [tongue]  The colors really pop. [smile]
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 09:17 AM by Cheese »

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #369 on: January 06, 2019, 02:39 PM »
Maybe it's actually not a finish at all.  The top surface of the pizza stone was kind yellowish before.  Right after I ran the bench scraper over the surface I saw some chips of the yellow surface had come off revealing "white" stone underneath.  I just checked again today and now it doesn't look so bad.  Maybe the coloring I'm seeing is more or less from the stone oxidizing in the air?  It might be a little hard to see in this picture, but today everything looks to be the same color again.

290222-0

Adding photos would be super helpful and useful.  It would almost become like a personal cookbook.  Only thing is that I'm too lazy to go back in to upload/attach the photos to the recipe after the fact.  This is despite the fact that I take pictures of all the food we cook and eat.

I know the feeling of finding recipes that were jotted down.  The worst part is is that I can't read my own handwriting half the time.

Yup, 1.5 lbs of ground beef, .5 lbs of ground pork, and .5 lbs of ground veal.  In the past I've just bought the prepackaged meatball/meatloaf mix since it's super convenient, but I think those are usually equal parts of each meat (that's what the store had yesterday anyway).  This time I wanted to get the "correct" ratio so I bought 3 separate packages and weighed and mixed it myself.

I haven't made meatballs that often either.  Last attempt I sous vide them and they turned out terribly!!  They were way too soft (which is supposed to be one of the "desirable" reasons to cook them sous vide.  I have to say that these meatballs turned out really well.  Frying them basically one by one in oil was a little tedious, but worth it I think.  I think the 1/2 cup of grated pecorino romano cheese inside really made it.  I bought a $10 jar of italian marinara sauce to cook the meatballs in since I didn't have time to make a marinara sauce at the same time as the meatballs.  I liked the sauce but was kinda floored at the cost - $10 for a regular jar.  Last night I used 2 28 ounce cans of whole san marzano tomatoes to make a homemade marinara.  It cooked for 4 hours and yielded probably the same amount of sauce as the $10 jar.  I think each can of tomatoes was about $5 so it basically ended up costing more than the store bought sauce when I figure the time and the gas used to cook it!  Here are some pictures of the homemade marinara sauce.







The salad was pretty good too - only problem was it was a little too salty.  I think it might have been that the canned olives were very salty and/or also that the lemon pepper had salt in it too.  I'm not sure if lemon pepper normally also has salt.  The lemon pepper we had might have also had salt as it was sold as "lemon pepper seasoning" and not just lemon pepper.  I'll know for next time though.  My wife really wanted to add cucumbers to the salad, but that wasn't in the original recipe that I was using so I wanted to try to stay true to the recipe at least for the first go around.  Next time cucumbers would be good in there.  I'd also really like to add in some strips of yellow and red bell pepper.

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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #370 on: January 06, 2019, 08:27 PM »
Back by popular demand is pizza for dinner tonight.

















I try not to re-post a meal that we've already had, but we had some lessons learned from last week's pizza making exercise:

Make double the amount of dough and freeze the extra.
Don't try to stretch the middle of the dough too much at first.
Put the pizza stone on the top rack of the lower oven instead of the top rack of the upper oven.
Don't put too much sauce.
Sauce closer to the edge.
Don't make the pizza too far ahead of putting into the oven.
Parmigiano Reggiano cheese tastes better than pre-grated pecorino romano cheese.

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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking: Duxelles Pizza with Arugula & Balsamic Reduction
« Reply #371 on: January 07, 2019, 11:05 AM »
I bought a $10 jar of italian marinara sauce to cook the meatballs in since I didn't have time to make a marinara sauce at the same time as the meatballs.  I liked the sauce but was kinda floored at the cost - $10 for a regular jar.  Last night I used 2 28 ounce cans of whole san marzano tomatoes to make a homemade marinara.  It cooked for 4 hours and yielded probably the same amount of sauce as the $10 jar.

That's funny...I've done/thought the same thing.  [smile]

How did the home made sauce compare flavor-wise to the $10 jarred sauce? 

I also made pizza last night.  [big grin]

I made a "Duxelles Pizza with Arugula and Peach Balsamic Reduction"  It was absolutely delicious!!! It's now on the list of keepers.  [cool]

As I mentioned yesterday, this is one of those dishes that I like to take pictures of each stage, so when I make this again in a few months, I'll more easily remember how it was done. Easier and faster to just look at the photos than read the text.

I'll enter all these photos into Paprika but use the final photo as the recipe photo.

Home made crust with the duxelles slathered across the surface.



Fresh mozzarella sprinkled on the duxelles



A blend of mushrooms placed over the mozzarella



The cooked pizza is pulled from the oven and...



the arugula and balsamic reduction is added.




Then it's sliced & served. Like I said, it was delicious. Next time I'll give it a minute or two longer so that the crust crisps up a bit more.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 10:13 AM by Cheese »

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 885
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #372 on: January 09, 2019, 09:38 AM »
How did the home made sauce compare flavor-wise to the $10 jarred sauce? 

I also made pizza last night.  [big grin]

I made a "Duxelles Pizza with Arugula and Peach Balsamic Reduction"  It was absolutely delicious!!! It's now on the list of keepers.  [cool]

As I mentioned yesterday, this is one of those dishes that I like to take pictures of each stage, so when I make this again in a few months, I'll more easily remember how it was done. Easier and faster to just look at the photos than read the text.

I'll enter all these photos into Paprika but use the final photo as the recipe photo.

I actually think the store bought sauce was slightly better than the homemade, though I think that's mainly because I didn't add enough salt to our sauce and maybe reduced it down a little too much.

Wow we both made pizza on the same night!  That looks really good.  I never really would have thought of using a duxelle of mushrooms in lieu of tomato sauce.  A balsamic vinegar reduction would go great with the arugula.  I wish I had thought to do that on our pizza.

Adding the step by step pictures along the way is great.  As I was saying, I'm probably too lazy to upload them after the fact.  I also sometimes forget to take a picture of a step when I get in a hurry and/or my hands are messy and don't want to touch my phone.
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #373 on: January 14, 2019, 10:18 AM »
I forgot to upload the mozzarella and Tawainese spinach omelet that I made last week using the leftover spinach from the udon and the cheese from the pizza.







Saturday night we made a take on Olive Garden's Zuppa Tuscano.















Sunday we had a snow day.  We had dried scallop congee for brunch.







Dinner was an indoor picnic of sorts. Hot dogs with homemade coleslaw,  2 kinds of potato salad - trying to recreate my grandpa's recipe and a korean version, and Boston baked beans. This is my first time ever trying to make coleslaw and mayo based potato salad.
















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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #374 on: January 20, 2019, 10:21 AM »
I made chicken ala king last night. It was my first time ever making it and it turned out pretty good. Tasted like Stouffers, but better. 
The seared chicken ended up being a little rubbery so I think I might cook it differently next time.  I'd also use chopped pimentos instead of sliced pimentos.























Yesterday was National Popcorn Day so we had popcorn and a root beer float for dessert.



We also made the oven roux for tonight's seafood gumbo.



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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #375 on: January 22, 2019, 11:15 AM »
Sunday night we made seafood gumbo.











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Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #376 on: January 22, 2019, 12:55 PM »
Looks good...I need to do this. [big grin] Haven't cooked this in a while.  [sad]   I'll usually cook a crawfish jambalaya instead because it's quicker.

I see the Trinity with some garlic.

I don't see the Andouille.

Frozen okra, how's the flavor?

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #377 on: January 22, 2019, 01:15 PM »
Do you use frozen crawfish tails?  Yes, it is a rather time consuming endeavor to make the gumbo.  At least we have 2 more batches of the roux frozen for next time.

Our version of gumbo is likely to be considered not real gumbo by aficionados.  We're breaking all kinds of laws, including putting in tomatoes [oops].

Yup, Trinity with a little bit of garlic.

We don't put Andouille sausage in this recipe.  I can't remember if the original recipe called for Andouille or not, but we have trouble finding an authentic Andouille around here, so I think that might be why I removed it from the recipe.  I ordered some frozen crawfish tails, frozen gator tail meat, and Andouille sausage last February, just before Fat Tuesday from www.lawcrawfish.com.  I think we still have 1 package of the Andouille sausage left.  I'm saving that to make chicken and Andouille jambalaya again.  I'm gonna need to reorder from them again soon! 

The original recipe also called for oysters and I think some other kind of seafood, which I also omitted because it may be difficult to acquire and it would also increase the total cost of the dish.

The frozen okra is ok I guess.  It still imparts its sliminess.  We have used fresh okra in the past and I guess it is slightly more slimier, but not a world of difference to me.  It's cooked for 1 hour so it basically cooked down to nothing.  Fresh okra is sometimes hard to find locally also and sometimes it can be pricey.  The frozen okra is easy and it's already sliced so I can just dump 2 bags in.  Plus it's a standard measurement.  Often the store sells the okra prepackaged so it can make it difficult to get just the right amount that we need.  One of my pet peeves with recipes is when they call for like "2.5 cups of chopped bell peppers or 1/2 cup of chopped onion."  I don't know how many peppers chopped up will yield 2.5 cups so I change the recipe to call for "4 bell peppers" or "6 stalks of celery" or "1 20oz can of whole peaches" units of measure that make sense to me.
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Offline ctfeet

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #378 on: January 22, 2019, 01:29 PM »
Maybe this is way off base and most people are not at all interested. But I thought I'd give it a go.

Being a foodie and someone who likes to cook (I like to think that I'm a better cook than a woodworker), I thought it might be a nice to start a thread of people showing what they've been cooking.

Last night we made sous vide duck breast with broad bean tips, leftover scalloped potatoes, and jasmine rice:


I've done some sous vide cooking myself and I love it, but my searing NEVER comes out that good! How do you sear your food? Do you a torch, pan or grill?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6519
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #379 on: January 22, 2019, 01:54 PM »
One of my pet peeves with recipes is when they call for like "2.5 cups of chopped bell peppers or 1/2 cup of chopped onion."  I don't know how many peppers chopped up will yield 2.5 cups so I change the recipe to call for "4 bell peppers" or "6 stalks of celery" or "1 20oz can of whole peaches" units of measure that make sense to me.

Yes I purchase frozen crawfish from Coastal Seafood. There's one right up the street so I can walk the 2 dogs and purchase the mud-bugs at the same time.  Multi-tasking at its best.  [smile]

I also have a difficult time finding good Andouille.  [sad]  Some of it just tastes like pork sausage run amok.

Fresh oysters around here are $2 each, so adding fresh oysters bumps up the grocery tab significantly. Especially for a dish that was basically meant to be a "use what you have on hand" dish.

I've used fresh okra but it's never available locally until the fall. I'll check out the frozen variant. It's really just used as a thickener?

I share your pain with the measurement conundrum. I'm cooking Ore House Stew today and they want me to add 5 cups of cubed stew meat...what the HEY?  Why not just say 2 1/2 #?

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 885
Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #380 on: January 22, 2019, 03:30 PM »
I've done some sous vide cooking myself and I love it, but my searing NEVER comes out that good! How do you sear your food? Do you a torch, pan or grill?

@ctfeet  I've tried all 3 methods: torch, pan, and grill.  I never really had any luck with the torch.  I've tried using propane and MAPP gas, with and without the Searzall attachement and it was just soooo slow.





I was using the TS4000 burner tip so that might account for part of the problem.  I just recently bought the TS8000 burner, which is supposed to have a much better output than the TS4000.  I'm going to try that on International Sous Vide day, which is coming up on January 26.  I would like to have a good method for searing without needing to normally go outside because otherwise the house fills with smoke.

Using a cast iron pan is my favorite way of searing something that has been cooked sous vide.  For steaks, I go outside and place my cast iron skillet (filled with some avocado oil because of its high smoke point) either directly over my Vortex grill accessory, or more conveniently I'll use my Iwatani butane stove and crank the heat until the pan reaches about 500 degrees.  Then I'll sear the steak on each side for about 1.5-2 minutes.  That really develops a nice crust.













I've also tried place the cast iron over the chimney and over the charcoal baskets .











I actually cooked the duck breasts inside in a stainless steel skillet.



I didn't crank the heat that high because I don't want the whole house to get all smokey, but also because I want to try to render some of the fat from the duck breast.  I don't remember the exact cooking time, but I think I preheated some canola oil in the pan and then seared over medium high heat for 3-5 minutes.  The duck breast had been cooked at 135 degrees.  I cook my steaks at 124 degrees, which I think helps the meat tolerate the longer and higher heat searing outside without being overcooked.  I  have ended up overcooking a steak slightly (gray branding below the crust) when using a torch because of the intense concentrated heat from the flame.

Grilling looks nice from an appearance perspective, but the grill marks are really just parts of the meat that burnt from contact with the grill grate.  I only have a charcoal grill so the standard thin grill grates don't make the best grill marks.  If I want really awesome looking grill marks I'll use my GrillGrates over my Slow N Sear.  That only takes about 1 or 1.5 minutes per side, including turning the steak 45 degrees to get that diamond pattern.  As nice as the diamond grills marks look, I'd still rather have a nice all over sear in oil.











I've also tried grilling over the coals in the charcoal basket and directly over the chimney.  In both cases I found the steak just burned too much.







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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #381 on: January 22, 2019, 03:55 PM »
Yes I purchase frozen crawfish from Coastal Seafood. There's one right up the street so I can walk the 2 dogs and purchase the mud-bugs at the same time.  Multi-tasking at its best.  [smile]

I also have a difficult time finding good Andouille.  [sad]  Some of it just tastes like pork sausage run amok.

Fresh oysters around here are $2 each, so adding fresh oysters bumps up the grocery tab significantly. Especially for a dish that was basically meant to be a "use what you have on hand" dish.

I've used fresh okra but it's never available locally until the fall. I'll check out the frozen variant. It's really just used as a thickener?

I share your pain with the measurement conundrum. I'm cooking Ore House Stew today and they want me to add 5 cups of cubed stew meat...what the HEY?  Why not just say 2 1/2 #?

Do they let your dogs inside or do they have to wait outside?

Yup, worse yet I've seen some Andouille with chicken, that's definitely not right!

I saw a pint of "extra small oysters" at Costco yesterday for $7.99.  That sounds like a pretty reasonable price.  I'm not sure how much it is at the asian supermarket where we usually shop.  It is annoying to have to go to Costco to get one or 2 ingredients to make a recipe though.  Another reason we omitted the oysters is that I often find they are gritty, and I'm always the first one to cry when I find grit in my shrimp, clam, oyster, etc.  We did remind ourselves that this is "seafood gumbo."  A chicken and Andouille gumbo would probably be considerably cheaper to make.  Out of curiosity I added up the approximate cost of the seafood gumbo.  It was about $38.58 before tax.  That's enough for 3 meals for 2 people each meal so the final cost per person is less than $7 per person per meal.  That's really not bad - I often feel like there are times when it's really cheaper to eat out than cooking at home.

Maybe it's not quite as good of a thickener as fresh okra, but pretty close.  It's a little hard to say as our gumbo is rather thin to begin with.  I was considering reducing the amount of shrimp stock by 2 cups to make it a little thicker, but my wife said she likes it the consistency that we have.

I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one with the measurement conundrum.  Sometimes unless you go to an actual butcher it's hard to get "2lbs of ground beef" or whatever.  In those cases, I'll modify the recipe to just say the "large or family size pack of ground beef" since I'm usually at the mercy of whatever is prepackaged.  I think the original recipe for the zuppa tuscano we made the other day called for "an 8 ounce can of chicken broth."  Someone in the comments felt our pain and asked who even sells chicken broth in an 8 ounce can.
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #382 on: January 29, 2019, 05:51 PM »
Saturday was the 2nd annual International Sous Vide day (when I first mentioned it the other day I didn't realize it was a relatively new anniversary date).

I made the so called "perfect" 63 degree egg for breakfast.  The egg is cooked at 63.2 degree C for 45 minutes.





For dinner we had sous vide steak with sous vide potatoes. I put in too much kosher salt so they ended up too salty. The potato flavor was also rather intense, in this case that wasn't really a good thing for me (tasted very "earthy").






I finished the steak using the Searzall with my newly acquired TS8000 tip. I think the Searzall was more efficient and faster with the TS8000 tip. I still think cast iron is the best way to finish a sous vide steak.







For dessert I made sous vide creme brulee. I first tried to torch the sugar with the Searzall, but I think it didn't work very well because I couldn't get the flame close enough to the sugar. I switched to a cheaper propane tip with the flame turned way down.







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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #383 on: February 04, 2019, 03:14 PM »
On Saturday night, we made california rolls, which I've already shown pictures of.  We found some hamachi kama (yellowtail collar) at the asian market.  I roasted them in the oven and served them with some ponzu soy sauce.



Last night I made a salt and pepper roast chicken from a NY Times recipe.  I bought an expensive organic air chilled chicken from Whole Foods thinking it was going to taste like the best chicken ever - it tasted like any other regular chicken that I've bought.  I'm pretty disappointed with the recipe.  I seasoned the outside and inside of the chicken with 2 1/2 tsp of sea salt and 2 tsp of pepper about 6 hours before cooking,  but the bird still came out under seasoned.  I wonder if dry brining over night would have make a difference. The chicken baked at 450 degrees, which resulted in a very smokey oven.






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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #384 on: February 06, 2019, 09:07 PM »
 
 OK,  an admittedly dumb question. But here goes. What is the real deal difference between cooking  something in a slow cooker and cooking sous-vide?
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #385 on: February 06, 2019, 09:16 PM »
The French term sous vide translates to under vacuum.  By using a sous vide cooker with a bagged item that has minimal air in the bag you allow heat transfer to all outside areas of the item being cooked at the same rate (slow) without creating areas that cook slower or faster.  Just like someone could be cooked in a hot tub.  It will be enjoyable for a while, but over time  [eek]

Sous vide cookers are precise.  Slow cookers are not.

Peter

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #386 on: February 06, 2019, 09:42 PM »
In addition ^^^^

      It has a different cooking effect than a slow cooker. You will get less of a caramelized blending of flavors with sous vide than a slow cooker.

     Slow cooker is great for stew.

     Sous vide is great for proteins that you want cooked but to have an almost uncooked result. Sous vide tends to preserve the natural food state better than a slow cooker.

    Hard to describe but that is probably sort of close.

Seth

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #387 on: February 07, 2019, 01:05 AM »
A slow cooker is great for...think about it...it’s coming up... corned beef for March 17th.

They’re also good for stews, chili’s and my fav...beef bourguignon. Anything that needs to “stew in it’s own juices” is a good candidate.

Some people have bragged about baking a cake in a slow cooker...but that’s certainly not my thing.

Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #388 on: February 07, 2019, 02:57 AM »

(...)

They’re also good for stews, chili’s and my fav...beef bourguignon. Anything that needs to “stew in it’s own juices” is a good candidate.

(...)

Someone called my name?

From a couple of days ago.




And a visit to our favorite "every day" casual restaurant.











Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #389 on: February 07, 2019, 12:55 PM »

Someone called my name?


 [smile]

Hey Oliver, the 3rd photo is salmon and what kind of sauce?

And the fish dish in the 5th photo, what different fish have been plated up?