Author Topic: A Website to Check Regularly  (Read 75365 times)

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Offline Peter Halle

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A Website to Check Regularly
« on: July 09, 2011, 06:43 PM »
As a public service announcement type of post, I just wanted to let members in North America know that there is a website that you should check occasionally:  The Consumer Products Safety Commission.  This website has a listing of all recalls in effect.  I am posting this because just the other day I was in a Lowe's store returning extra materials and turned around and saw a flyer on the wall that was a recall for my kitchen range that had been issued in 2009.  Although I registered my range I was never notified of the recall.  In 2001 I had a fire in my house caused by a faulty fax machine.  Luckily I was there to put it out, but if not?  Again, I had registered that product and had not been notified.  The manufacturer chose to put a sticker on the ink jet refills for that machine instead of sending written notice to owners.

I am not being a sky is falling kind of guy here, just bringing it to your attention.

Here is the link:  US Consumer Protection Saftey Commission Website.

A link to the area where you can check by categories:  Searching by category  (When you select your category you need to click the find button.)

Be safe my friends!

Peter
« Last Edit: July 09, 2011, 06:50 PM by Peter »

Offline Sal LiVecchi

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2011, 09:04 AM »
Peter   Thank You, just found a recall on one of my freezers , I had no clue about


Sal
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Offline Alan m

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2011, 11:01 AM »
great site to know about. if you find one for our side of the pond can you post it
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2011, 11:49 AM »
Alan,

Ask and ye shall receive to some degree:  European Recalls


Peter
« Last Edit: July 10, 2011, 11:51 AM by Peter »

Offline Festoolfootstool

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2011, 12:46 PM »
Hmmm to a small degree perhaps... certain fridges burning houses down and killing people very late to let anyone know there was an issue [sad]
If the milk turns out to be sour, I ain't the kind of **** to drink it.......

Why do Festool accessories only have a two month guarantee here in the UK ?

Offline ghart33

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2011, 10:03 PM »
Thanks for the note, it's good to be aware.

Offline dwillis

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2011, 05:41 PM »
 [scared] Great, just found my Rigid table saw with a recall notice dated 2009.  Fortunately I haven't used a stacked dado set (the cause of shaft failures), so now I have to find out if they will make repairs...
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Offline TomLewis

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2011, 09:01 PM »
My radial arm saw was a subject to a recall back in 2000. Though the saw was from about 1974, they sent me half the saws components, all modified to be 'safer'. I decided to chuck the saw and stick with my AT 65.
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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2012, 08:26 PM »
Peter, thanks for posting this, you never know when you will end up being the guy who dodges the stray bullet...

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Deke

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2012, 08:54 AM »
Thanks very much for this. My wife thinks I am nuts for always unplugging the coffee maker (and phones and anything else charging) for fire issues, but one look at the coffee maker page convinced me I am not crazy (at least on this topic). I can't imagine there is too much money in this, but imagine an app where you could list all your appliances and tools and then receive an alert if one is recalled or the the subject of some notice. I can program google alerts to message me when anything with the string "Festool" goes on our local Craigslist (uh oh, my secret weapon is out now), so this seems doable.

Offline Paul G

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2013, 12:38 PM »
I wonder if this site has different info than www.recalls.gov, or did we just stumble upon some of that duplicate govt we're all paying for? (I keep searching that site for a recalled defective politician but they must be exempt ;))
+1

Offline Slappy

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2013, 01:12 PM »


(I keep searching that site for a recalled defective politician but they must be exempt ;))

The defective ones haven't been re-called yet .
Mike

Offline Richard D.

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2013, 11:31 PM »
Oh my, I just found out there is a recall on the TS55!   [big grin]
RD

Offline wow

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2013, 10:15 PM »
My wife thinks I am nuts for always unplugging the coffee maker (and phones and anything else charging) for fire issues

If you have one of those plug-in air fresheners - regardless of brand - get rid of it NOW. A member of my family is a Fire Marshall and goes absolutely CRAZY if they see any of us with one of those. Or I should say SAW any of us...since all such fire hazards have been banished from our homes permanently.

Another quick note - did you know that you need to replace your smoke/fire alarms every 10 years? They become ineffective over time. I didn't know that until just recently!
Trying to be one of the most helpful members on the FOG.

Offline gkaiseril

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2014, 06:16 PM »
My wife thinks I am nuts for always unplugging the coffee maker (and phones and anything else charging) for fire issues

If you have one of those plug-in air fresheners - regardless of brand - get rid of it NOW. A member of my family is a Fire Marshall and goes absolutely CRAZY if they see any of us with one of those. Or I should say SAW any of us...since all such fire hazards have been banished from our homes permanently.

Another quick note - did you know that you need to replace your smoke/fire alarms every 10 years? They become ineffective over time. I didn't know that until just recently!

Many smoke detectors use decaying radioactive material to detect the smoke so not only do they need to be replaced but properly disposed of. There are smoke detectory that use a only a photo optical detector so these do not have the radio active material. But there are combination units that use both types of detectors.

Besides regularly replacing the batteries one should make make sure dust is not building up on the detector. It wold also be a good idea to check the detector with me smoking paper.

When you install the smoke detector, you can write the installation date on the back of the alarm unit with a permanent marker.

Another home appliance that requires special care is the toaster oven. Many may think the oven automatically turns off like the toaster, but that might not always be the case. I have seen many designs for the timer where one can try to turn the unit off but because the know spins 360 degrees the know ends up at the "On" position. Also the "oven" is not as well insulated as large oven and the housing can become very hot. This type of appliance should never be operated unattended.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2014, 06:27 PM by gkaiseril »
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Offline Greg Powers

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2014, 04:26 PM »
Another quick note - did you know that you need to replace your smoke/fire alarms every 10 years? They become ineffective over time. I didn't know that until just recently!

Some have even a shorter lifespan 7 or 8 years. Others start to squawk when they have exceeded there lifespans 
Greg Powers
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Offline charley1968

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2015, 08:19 PM »
Thanx,Peter!
Just for today..

Offline Tinker

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2015, 06:41 AM »
I only just discovered this thread.

I am sure most of us have fire extinguishers in our shops.
Some of us carry them in our vehicles. 
They should be checked regularly.
they should be checked as a minimum once per year.
some types even shorter periods between checking.
Tinker
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Offline slalom

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2016, 11:54 AM »
This is a tread that can be a life saver - literally.

By searching the site I found that my kit of Apple adapters has been recalled due to a safety hazard. Nothing like plugging a defective adapter into 220v 7.5A mains to light up your day!. Apple is shipping the replacement bits and I should have them by the end of the week. Apple gets an A for good customer service.

Had an issue with a Festool ETC125 EQ sander - Festool followed up, suggested that I take it to the dealer (beyond 30 warranty) and together we solved the problem. That is good service.

These companies know that repeat business is important.

In checking the recalls I found that my Ryobi lithium battery charger had been recalled. Apparently they can overheat and have damaged workbenches. If the charger overheats, I have seen what happens when a lithium battery gets too hot. Not something to take risks with. So I called and the process is very different. I have to call the shipping company, box up the charger and send it back. When they get the charger, they will ship me a replacement. So I asked "How am I to charge my batteries in the interim?". Answer, "Buy another tool with a charger and battery". Ok it is Ryobi. Not the best tools, but before I was making furniture for others, it was what I could justify to my wife and CFO.

I think I will buy another tool, a Festool.  [smile]

Offline danbox

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #19 on: May 24, 2016, 04:56 PM »
I wonder if this site has different info than www.recalls.gov, or did we just stumble upon some of that duplicate govt we're all paying for? (I keep searching that site for a recalled defective politician but they must be exempt ;))

What are you saying? Politicians don't act in the best interests of the people that they are supposed to represent.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #20 on: May 24, 2016, 07:43 PM »
That post was a long time ago.  The website I posted is about real recalls.  Don't worry about trash posts .

Peter

Offline Shane Holland

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Offline Peter Halle

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Ford Transit Safety Recall - North America
« Reply #22 on: July 02, 2017, 06:11 PM »
I just wanted to let fellow Transit owners in North America know that most likely there is a safety recall on your van.  Here is a link to the official statement from Ford.  This was only announced a few days ago so you may not have received any notification from Ford.

https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2017/06/28/ford-issues-one-safety-recall-and-two-safety-compliance-recalls.html

Drive safely!

Peter

Offline bobfog

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #23 on: July 02, 2017, 06:17 PM »
FORD - Fix Or Repair Daily.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2019, 07:36 AM »
I know that sometimes a less expensive corded drill exists in shops, trucks, and homes.  There is a recall on certain Dewalt corded drills.  You might also want to take a few minutes and scroll thru the other pages.

I am not being an alarmist or dissing a manufacturer but rather just passing some info that popped onto one of my internet feeds:
 https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls

Peter

Offline tomp

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2019, 09:29 AM »
I know that sometimes a less expensive corded drill exists in shops, trucks, and homes.  There is a recall on certain Dewalt corded drills.  You might also want to take a few minutes and scroll thru the other pages.

I am not being an alarmist or dissing a manufacturer but rather just passing some info that popped onto one of my internet feeds:
 https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls

Peter

Thanks, I bookmarked the page so I can check now and then.

Tom

Offline Peter Halle

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Offline Charles959

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2020, 09:22 PM »
You can sign up at this US Govt. Website to be notified of various types of recalls:

https://www.recalls.gov/list.html

Ten years ago, I had an iPod Touch. For 99 cents, I bought an app called All Recalls. I was astonished at how many recalls there were, and how little attention they received. That app appears to be defunct.

Even a book can be recalled:

http://activerain.com/blogsview/992433/wiring-books-recall

Offline Charles959

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2020, 08:40 AM »
Ring Recalls Video Doorbells (2nd Generation) Due to Fire Hazard

https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2020/ring-recalls-video-doorbells-2nd-generation-due-to-fire-hazard

Name of product:
Ring Video Doorbells (2nd Generation)
Hazard:
The video doorbell’s battery can overheat when the incorrect screws are used for installation, posing fire and burn hazards.
Remedy:
New Instructions
Recall date:
November 10, 2020
Units:
About 350,000 (In addition, about 8,700 were sold in Canada)


You can check to see if your sample is affected here:

https://support.ring.com/hc/en-us/articles/360050949611

Excerpt: The video doorbell’s battery can overheat when the incorrect screws are used for installation, posing fire and burn hazards. This recall involves Ring Video Doorbell (2nd Generation), model number 5UM5E5 smart doorbell cameras. Only Ring Video Doorbell (2nd Generation) models with certain serial numbers are included.

If the doorbell is installed correctly, there is no risk to consumers or potential hazard present.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 08:42 AM by Charles959 »

Offline Alex

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2020, 09:54 AM »
Wow, imagine your design being so vulnerable that the use of the wrong type of screws can mean the difference between fire and not fire. I can't wrap my head around that, seems to me you'd better avoid such a product entirely.

Offline DeformedTree

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2020, 10:29 AM »
Wow, imagine your design being so vulnerable that the use of the wrong type of screws can mean the difference between fire and not fire. I can't wrap my head around that, seems to me you'd better avoid such a product entirely.

It's not hard to see at all.  This is the very thing that the vast majority of recalls are about.  Something could be loose, something could be over tight,  something could be a bit to close, if installer does something just a hair off.  Recalls are rarely some major thing or obvious thing, it's the whole reason this happens.  Folks designing stuff can plan for a fair bit of things, but they can't plan for everything.   Plan for someone using too big of a screw, someone will find an even bigger screw.  And when any of that happens it's on the manufactures because no one will accept they installed it wrong and they are at fault, everyone runs right back to the manufacture and blames them.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 11:57 AM by DeformedTree »

Offline Bob D.

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2020, 10:47 AM »
Of course if you think an over 1 inch long wood screw should be used to secure the doorbell to the mounting bracket then you probably didn't read the installation instructions and don't have a clue as how to install anything. It would be like using a 16d nail to hang sheetrock.

I have the doorbell in question. Reading the instructions I had no trouble understanding them and using the correct screw in the correct location. The instructions clearly describe and illustrate which screw to use where.

This recall is about protecting those who refuse to read the manual from themselves.
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Offline DeformedTree

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2020, 12:02 PM »

This recall is about protecting those who refuse to read the manual from themselves.

Ding!

Type in IKEA in the search, it's tons of this sort of thing.  Everything at IKEA is a laceration danger.   Not sure how it works elsewhere in the world, but in the US, companies have to live in constant fear of people suing them because the people refused to read/use correctly/understand physics/etc.

Offline RustE

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2020, 12:14 PM »
...
Not sure how it works elsewhere in the world, but in the US, companies have to live in constant fear of people suing them because the people refused to read/use correctly/understand physics/etc.

Hence instruction manuals with chainsaws have “DO NOT ATTEMPT TO STOP CHAIN WITH HANDS” only in English (American).  Once upon a time, I heard or read a comment that anywhere else in the world a person would be too embarrassed to admit to doing such.

Offline Charles959

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #34 on: November 11, 2020, 01:07 PM »
The revised installation instructions for the Ring Video Doorbell (2nd Generation) are here:

https://support.ring.com/hc/en-us/articles/360040763632

The illustration showing the difference between the correct short security screws and the incorrect lengthy wood screws is funny. I will not spoil the other amusing detail.

From the dramatic conclusion:

Secure your Video Doorbell.

CAUTION!


If you use the wrong screws to secure the Video Doorbell, you could damage the battery during installation, create a fire hazard, and be seriously injured.

DO NOT USE any screw other than the included short security screws when securing your Video Doorbell to the bracket.
Use the star-shaped end of the included screwdriver to drive the two security screws into the bottom of your
 Video Doorbell.
 

Offline DeformedTree

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2020, 01:24 PM »
interesting there is Europe and US instructions.   They are laid out different, but in the end the same.  I like how in the US it is "use a 1/4" drill bit",  in the EU it's "use the included drill bit".  So sounds like they rather include a drillbit for Europe verses ship with metric anchors?  Not like anyone ever uses included hardware for stuff like that.   I figured that was where the issue was, but no, it's the screw internal to the setup.  Why would someone not use the screw?  I'm left to assume it's an oddball screw so if someone drops/looses it, they have no idea what do and probably just grab a handy drywall screw.  Maybe time for captive hardware.

Offline Charles959

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #36 on: November 11, 2020, 01:57 PM »
interesting there is Europe and US instructions.   They are laid out different, but in the end the same.  I like how in the US it is "use a 1/4" drill bit",  in the EU it's "use the included drill bit".  So sounds like they rather include a drillbit for Europe verses ship with metric anchors?  Not like anyone ever uses included hardware for stuff like that.   I figured that was where the issue was, but no, it's the screw internal to the setup.  Why would someone not use the screw?  I'm left to assume it's an oddball screw so if someone drops/looses it, they have no idea what do and probably just grab a handy drywall screw.  Maybe time for captive hardware.

If the screw that the Ring people include is a security screw, rather than a regular Torx screw, then including a security screwdriver significantly increases the number of such tools owned by the general public. I recall that years ago, buying such screwdrivers online required submitting a scan of a company letterhead.

Offline Alex

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #37 on: November 11, 2020, 02:21 PM »
It's not hard to see at all.  This is the very thing that the vast majority of recalls are about.  Something could be loose, something could be over tight,  something could be a bit to close, if installer does something just a hair off.  Recalls are rarely some major thing or obvious thing, it's the whole reason this happens.

Well, I wasn't talking about the reasons and merits of recalls in general, but about this specific case.

Which was described on that website as an OVERHEATING problem, due to using the wrong screws. And that just sounded weird in my head. User installed screws should have no bearing on the heat a battery generates or dissipates. If it does, that's a mayor design flaw.

But the real trouble here is PUNCTURING the battery. Now I understand that a battery bursting in flames due to the reaction of lithium and water can technically be called a form of overheating, but I think most people would call it PUNCTURING.   [tongue]

Folks designing stuff can plan for a fair bit of things, but they can't plan for everything.   

They could, and should have anticipated this. The volatility of lithium-ion batteries is a well known fact in the engineering world. As problems with them can lead to sincere consequences including death due to a fire, guarding the battery's safety is a top priority during the design. Which means you don't give an a-technical user who screws up the opportunity to drive a screw into the battery in the first place. A dumb mistake.

It is also a dumb mistake of the manufacturer to solve the problem with a mere amendment in the installation instructions. This will not absolve them in an American court when another doorbell bursts into flames. They should have installed a metal plate in the doorbell to protect the battery.

Offline DeformedTree

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #38 on: November 11, 2020, 02:25 PM »
Why would someone not use the screw?  I'm left to assume it's an oddball screw so if someone drops/looses it, they have no idea what do and probably just grab a handy drywall screw.  Maybe time for captive hardware.

If the screw that the Ring people include is a security screw, rather than a regular Torx screw, then including a security screwdriver significantly increases the number of such tools owned by the general public. I recall that years ago, buying such screwdrivers online required submitting a scan of a company letterhead.

"security screws" have always been a BS idea.  They just cause more screw types to be invented, more tools needed, etc. They are secure for all of the couple days till someone makes the matching tool for them so people can work on their stuff.  Apple has been bad about this for years. If someone wants to steal rings, they will just find the correct screw driver and start stealing them.

Between the potential for being lost and no easy way to have a replacement, or the possibility it's a security torx and folks don't have the tool, this just sets things up for people to find another way.

This could be a case of people may not be using the product right, but if you set it up where they have few options but to use it wrong, then it comes back on Ring.   Use a common fastener, put information in the documentation on what the screw is. If it said "use a M6x20 screw" (I have no idea the size, thus the point), then folks could find alternative screw.  This gets to a way to reduce a lot of hazards with products.  Provide good information that helps people support the products they buy.  Don't act like everything about it is special, and usage of any other part but OEM bits will cause death and destruction.  People will find a way, it's best to show them how to do it right.

Offline Alex

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #39 on: November 11, 2020, 02:28 PM »
Hmm, how does hacking a doorbell get you into the house ....  [scratch chin]

Offline Charles959

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #40 on: November 11, 2020, 02:38 PM »
It's not hard to see at all.  This is the very thing that the vast majority of recalls are about.  Something could be loose, something could be over tight,  something could be a bit to close, if installer does something just a hair off.  Recalls are rarely some major thing or obvious thing, it's the whole reason this happens.

Well, I wasn't talking about the reasons and merits of recalls in general, but about this specific case.

Which was described on that website as an OVERHEATING problem, due to using the wrong screws. And that just sounded weird in my head. User installed screws should have no bearing on the heat a battery generates or dissipates. If it does, that's a mayor design flaw.

But the real trouble here is PUNCTURING the battery. Now I understand that a battery bursting in flames due to the reaction of lithium and water can technically be called a form of overheating, but I think most people would call it PUNCTURING.   [tongue]

Folks designing stuff can plan for a fair bit of things, but they can't plan for everything.   

They could, and should have anticipated this. The volatility of lithium-ion batteries is a well known fact in the engineering world. As problems with them can lead to sincere consequences including death due to a fire, guarding the battery's safety is a top priority during the design. Which means you don't give an a-technical user who screws up the opportunity to drive a screw into the battery in the first place. A dumb mistake.

It is also a dumb mistake of the manufacturer to solve the problem with a mere amendment in the installation instructions. This will not absolve them in an American court when another doorbell bursts into flames. They should have installed a metal plate in the doorbell to protect the battery.

Just puncturing the battery can cause a fire, due to the reaction of lithium and water you mentioned. The puncture can also cause a spark.

From Why Lithium Batteries Catch Fire

How Lithium Batteries Work
A lithium battery consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte. Typically, the batteries transfer electrical charge from a lithium metal cathode through an electrolyte consisting of an organic solvent containing lithium salts over to a carbon anode. The specifics depend on the battery, but lithium-ion batteries usually contain a metal coil and a flammable lithium-ion fluid. Tiny metal fragments float in the liquid. The contents of the battery are under pressure, so if a metal fragment punctures a partition that keeps the components separate or the battery is punctured, the lithium reacts with water in the air vigorously, generating high heat and sometimes producing a fire.


Why Lithium Batteries Catch Fire or Explode
Lithium batteries are made to deliver high output with minimal weight. Battery components are designed to be lightweight, which translates into thin partitions between cells and a thin outer covering. The partitions or coating are fairly fragile, so they can be punctured. If the battery is damaged, a short occurs. This spark can ignite the highly reactive lithium.

Another possibility is that the battery can heat to the point of thermal runaway. Here, the heat of the contents exerts pressure on the battery, potentially producing an explosion.

https://www.thoughtco.com/why-lithium-batteries-catch-fire-606814

Update: I just found out that the battery in the Ring Video Doorbell is a lithium-ion (as in rechargeable) battery, not a lithium primary battery. I do not know whether that has any effect on the details of the fire hazard posed by a puncture.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/9/16112752/ring-video-doorbell-2-security-camera-review

« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 04:04 PM by Charles959 »

Offline DeformedTree

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2020, 11:16 PM »
Hmm, how does hacking a doorbell get you into the house ....  [scratch chin]

I assume you are responding to me.  I said nothing about getting into the house.  I was talking about stealing the Ring Doorbell, if it is using some sort of security screw to prevent the theft of the ring doorbell, that will be defeated.

Offline Alex

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #42 on: November 12, 2020, 03:45 AM »
Hmm, how does hacking a doorbell get you into the house ....  [scratch chin]

I assume you are responding to me.  I said nothing about getting into the house.  I was talking about stealing the Ring Doorbell, if it is using some sort of security screw to prevent the theft of the ring doorbell, that will be defeated.

No, I was not responding to something you said, just wondering why it was necessary for the designers to fit the doorbell with security screws. As if tampering with a doorbell gets you anywhere.

Offline JimH2

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #43 on: November 12, 2020, 11:03 AM »
interesting there is Europe and US instructions.   They are laid out different, but in the end the same.  I like how in the US it is "use a 1/4" drill bit",  in the EU it's "use the included drill bit".  So sounds like they rather include a drillbit for Europe verses ship with metric anchors?  Not like anyone ever uses included hardware for stuff like that.   I figured that was where the issue was, but no, it's the screw internal to the setup.  Why would someone not use the screw?  I'm left to assume it's an oddball screw so if someone drops/looses it, they have no idea what do and probably just grab a handy drywall screw.  Maybe time for captive hardware.

The purpose of the screw is to make it harder for a casual prankster or criminal to futz with your doorbell. The various security screw drivers can be purchased from multiple places online.
If the screw that the Ring people include is a security screw, rather than a regular Torx screw, then including a security screwdriver significantly increases the number of such tools owned by the general public. I recall that years ago, buying such screwdrivers online required submitting a scan of a company letterhead.

Offline Packard

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2021, 09:26 AM »
No need to check regularly.  They offer a subscription service and they will email you recall notices each day at the end of the business day.  A quick scan of the items is all that you need to do. 

There is a blue toggle bar down towards the bottom of the page that says:

 Recalls

Never Miss a Recall
Choose Your Recall Emails


Fill in your email address and click what delivery option you want and you will get daily notices.

Offline mike_aa

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #45 on: January 27, 2021, 10:01 AM »
It also pays to check the CPSC when selling old equipment. 

I have a 25 year old bench radial arm saw in storage that I just recently decided to sell.  In searching for the manual online I stumbled upon a recall issued in 2006 for this saw and I was relieved to find it since I definitely did not want to unknowingly sell a recalled product.  I called the company and they had me remove the motor/arbor to put in a box for Fedex to pick up to return.  They are supposed to send me a recall reimbursement check when it arrives there.

Mike A.   

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #46 on: June 15, 2021, 11:59 PM »

Online squall_line

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #47 on: June 16, 2021, 12:47 AM »
Here is one that may be of interest to people

    https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2021/Non-Contact-Voltage-Testers-Recalled-by-Klein-Tools-Due-to-Shock-Hazard

Seth

I have a couple of NCVTs, I think at least one is a Klein; definitely going to check them in the morning. 

Thanks!

Offline Packard

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #48 on: June 16, 2021, 08:59 AM »
As a public service announcement type of post, I just wanted to let members in North America know that there is a website that you should check occasionally:  The Consumer Products Safety Commission.  This website has a listing of all recalls in effect.  I am posting this because just the other day I was in a Lowe's store returning extra materials and turned around and saw a flyer on the wall that was a recall for my kitchen range that had been issued in 2009.  Although I registered my range I was never notified of the recall.  In 2001 I had a fire in my house caused by a faulty fax machine.  Luckily I was there to put it out, but if not?  Again, I had registered that product and had not been notified.  The manufacturer chose to put a sticker on the ink jet refills for that machine instead of sending written notice to owners.

I am not being a sky is falling kind of guy here, just bringing it to your attention.

Here is the link:  US Consumer Protection Saftey Commission Website.

A link to the area where you can check by categories:  Searching by category  (When you select your category you need to click the find button.)

Be safe my friends!

Peter

You don't have to check it.  You can subscribe to notifications.  I get notifications automatically after I subscribed.  Usually it is one to four items and it usually comes once a week.  It takes seconds to scan the notifications.  I've notified friends when I've seen recalls on products they use.  So far nothing I use has been recalled.  I subscribed a few years back and I don't recall how I did it.  But visit the site and look for the option.  It's there.

Online squall_line

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #49 on: June 16, 2021, 09:28 AM »
You don't have to check it.  You can subscribe to notifications.  I get notifications automatically after I subscribed.  Usually it is one to four items and it usually comes once a week.  It takes seconds to scan the notifications.  I've notified friends when I've seen recalls on products they use.  So far nothing I use has been recalled.  I subscribed a few years back and I don't recall how I did it.  But visit the site and look for the option.  It's there.

Thank you for pointing that out!

It's right on the home page, under "Recalls - Never Miss a Recall", the button marked "Choose Your Recall Emails".  Scroll down just a little on the main home page depending on your screen size.

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #50 on: June 16, 2021, 09:32 AM »
I signed on to receive emails a few months ago. You will  not  get barraged with emails. Works very well.

Seth

Offline Packard

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Re: A Website to Check Regularly
« Reply #51 on: June 16, 2021, 09:36 AM »
I signed on to receive emails a few months ago. You will  not  get barraged with emails. Works very well.

Seth

That has been my experience.  The email comes with a summary of which products are involved, and then you can choose to examine those in detail.  As I said, it takes seconds to scan, and I scan each notification when it arrives.  Not a burden at all.

Offline Peter Halle

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Large Recall on Dehumidifiers
« Reply #52 on: August 07, 2021, 08:14 AM »
Good Morning:

I just received a notice that a dehumidifier that I bought years ago has been recalled due to overheating and fire concerns.  Mine was on the list.

You may want to check out this link if you are in North America and have a portable dehumidifier:  http://www.newwidetech.com/en/news.php?act=view&id=9

Peter

Online squall_line

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Re: Large Recall on Dehumidifiers
« Reply #53 on: August 07, 2021, 10:32 AM »
Good Morning:

I just received a notice that a dehumidifier that I bought years ago has been recalled due to overheating and fire concerns.  Mine was on the list.

You may want to check out this link if you are in North America and have a portable dehumidifier:  http://www.newwidetech.com/en/news.php?act=view&id=9

Peter

Mine wasn't on this list this time, thankfully.  I replaced three of them at the manufacturers' cost in the time span of 2014-2018 under a previous recall, including one that was left behind in a house that my wife (girlfriend at the time) purchased; she hadn't been using the dehumidifier because it wasn't actually drying the air anymore, so it was nice to get a new unit for free.