Author Topic: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch  (Read 1211 times)

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Offline 4nthony

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What are you guys using to apply Rubio Monocoat to your rip cut edges on baltic birch?

I built a desk with 18mm BB. The majority of the pieces have 1/8" round overs and have been sanded to 120-150. I'm applying the wax using white Scotch-Brite pads and am constantly snagging the edges, either embedding the white fibers into the grain or ripping out small pieces. The edges are smooth to the touch but the fibers are still finding their way under the grain.

I've got some narrow parts and even when going in the direction of the grain, I'll snag the opposite side. Applying the wax perpendicular to the edge grain somewhat helps but

T-shirt material snags less than the Scotch-Brite but also absorbs a lot more wax.

Any tips and tricks?

Thanks!
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Anthony

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Offline Packard

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Re: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2022, 03:34 PM »
I think you are going to have to poly the edges before applying the wax.  You are not likely to build film thickness on the end grain. 

Let's wait for other opinions.  I have never experienced this.  But then I never tried to use wax as a final finish either.

Offline 4nthony

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Re: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2022, 05:30 PM »
I think you are going to have to poly the edges before applying the wax.  You are not likely to build film thickness on the end grain. 

Let's wait for other opinions.  I have never experienced this.  But then I never tried to use wax as a final finish either.

The Scotch-Brite pads work great when used on large, flat surfaces. It's only on thinner pieces where I'm experiencing snags.

Though, it's most likely my technique.
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Anthony

"The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you." - Kevin Kelly

Offline serge0n

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Re: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2022, 05:00 PM »
The Scotch-Brite pads work great when used on large, flat surfaces. It's only on thinner pieces where I'm experiencing snags.

Though, it's most likely my technique.

Nope, I had the same problem when I was applying Rubio to rounded over edges of BB drawer boxes. I ended up sanding just the edges to 220 and the issue mostly went away. Still a few snags here and there, but nothing terrible.

Offline kevinculle

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Re: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2022, 05:16 PM »
I made a walnut (ply with solid trim) floating TV console about a year ago finished with Rubio Monocoat.  I followed their guidelines and sanded up to 180 grit.  I like how it turned out appearance wise but there is a definite grain on the surfaces in one direction that picks up fuzz when dusting.  I think the sanding needs to go to at least 220 and perhaps 320 to end up with a smooth non-directional surface.  I am considering sanding the top surfaces of the piece with 220 and 320 and then lightly recoating with Rubio Monocoat.

Online Michael Kellough

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Re: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2022, 09:37 PM »
Rubio Monocoat is a pigmented oil with some wax. It doesn't produce a finish coat like a varnish or shellac so wood grain will always be present on the surface. You definitely want to raise the grain with water after the initial sanding and sand again.

Did you try a brush?

Since another coat won't stick to a dried coat you can't build color by layering. The sanding has to be fairly coarse (Rubio says 100-120 grit) to provide deep enough scratches to hold enough product to get the color you want in one (Mono) coat after wiping the excess.

You can sand finer but the finer you sand the more the product becomes a stain rather than a finish. I'm not a fan.

Offline 4nthony

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Re: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2022, 10:20 PM »
Nope, I had the same problem when I was applying Rubio to rounded over edges of BB drawer boxes. I ended up sanding just the edges to 220 and the issue mostly went away. Still a few snags here and there, but nothing terrible.

Good to know. The desk I built was a knockdown desk and I finished it today. After snapping a few close-up pictures, I noticed the round overs are a bit rough. I think I hit this edge by hand with maybe a 150 grit 3M sanding pad, which is probably why in other areas where I was less careful, it was snagging the pad



Overall, I do like the finish I get with Rubio, especially "Natural" on Baltic Birch. It has a white/yellowish pigment which keeps the baltic birch looking a little closer to its raw color, whereas "Pure" tends to lean orange. This is only my second project using Rubio. The first project it was used on a bunch of kitchen drawer boxes retrofitted into old cabinets. It has held up well so far in the kitchen. I'll have to see how well it holds up on a desktop.



Rubio Monocoat is a pigmented oil with some wax. It doesn't produce a finish coat like a varnish or shellac so wood grain will always be present on the surface. You definitely want to raise the grain with water after the initial sanding and sand again.

I read somewhere it was more or less derived from Linseed oil. I did not raise the grain. I had watched in a Jason Bent video where I think he said Rubio recommends raising the grain only after sanding above 150. I'll have to go back and rewatch it to see if I missed something.

Did you try a brush?

No, I did not try a brush. The only brushes I had on hand were foam brushes which probably would've snagged as well.

Since another coat won't stick to a dried coat you can't build color by layering. The sanding has to be fairly coarse (Rubio says 100-120 grit) to provide deep enough scratches to hold enough product to get the color you want in one (Mono) coat after wiping the excess.

You can sand finer but the finer you sand the more the product becomes a stain rather than a finish. I'm not a fan.

That's one of the things I like about Rubio. You can sand over an existing finish, reapply, and the color doesn't look patchy.

Maybe another day, I'll take the desk apart and repair some of the wood snags, but for now, lesson learned.
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Anthony

"The best way to get a correct answer on the internet is to post an obviously wrong answer and wait for someone to correct you." - Kevin Kelly

Online Michael Kellough

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Re: Snagged edges when applying Rubio Monocoat to Baltic Birch
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2022, 11:07 PM »
I like these brushes. They don’t hold much product but they spread it very smoothly. They clean easily but if you don’t have time they’re cheap enough to toss.