Author Topic: Sandpaper question: which one do you recommend, and how many of each grit should I first buy.  (Read 1238 times)

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Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
Hi all!

So I just upgraded from my 5” dewalt orbital sander to a rotex 150.
I now need to buy new sandpaper.

1- does anyone one has recommandation on good sand paper.
I’ve seen lots of recommandation for 3m cubitron.

I’ve purchased a test sample pack of mirka abranet I think, of galaxy sample tester pack from 80 to 400. Bought a festool granat 80-120-180-320 (320 was the only grit available after 180 at lee valley)

Didn’t have the time to test them all, but started with festool granat, and I find it ok.

Also, where can I purchase 3m cubitron in Canada?


2- Wanted to have an idea on how much of what grit should I keep on hand?
I only wood work on week end. It’s not a full time job, and even, I dont wood work every weekend.

Like, a box of each grit?
Since I cannot purchased a 60-75$ box of every grit (box of 50qty of 3m cubitron) what grit do you think is the most used? Or, wich grit I should purchased first?

Thanks all!
This sander is a-ma-zing!


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Offline denovo

  • Posts: 89
What type of wood are you sanding and why?

If you are sanding hardwood from a planer that will be stained then you will use/need different grits then if you are sanding MDF panels that are going to be painted. 

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
What type of wood are you sanding and why?

If you are sanding hardwood from a planer that will be stained then you will use/need different grits then if you are sanding MDF panels that are going to be painted.
I just sanded an ikea eucalyptus table top, chairs and bench.

Usually I work more with birch ply. I don’t own a planer, but sometime this summer I’ll borrow one to make a project with hardwood.


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Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 141
You could start using your sample packs to see which grits you use frequently then purchase accordingly.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
You could start using your sample packs to see which grits you use frequently then purchase accordingly.
Make sense!
Was too simple. Didn’t of that


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Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1377
There are some dealers who offer a sand paper kit, which usually comes in a Systainer. They typically have around 10 sheets per grit.

My most used sandpaper for all projects are probably 80 grit, 120 grit, and 220 grit. Changing sanders to something like a Rotex it drops to 24 grit and 36 grit more often than not. I use mostly Granat, but have 3M brand, and Mirka brand too. *shrugs*

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
There are some dealers who offer a sand paper kit, which usually comes in a Systainer. They typically have around 10 sheets per grit.

My most used sandpaper for all projects are probably 80 grit, 120 grit, and 220 grit. Changing sanders to something like a Rotex it drops to 24 grit and 36 grit more often than not.
Rotex is my only sander with my 5” cheap dewalt.

I figured it was a good buy. Reviews says that it’s very good for fast stock removal, but also can achieve a nice finish.

Was looking for the ETS 150 too I believe, but figured it was a bit less good “all around” but better in finishing.

I’ve seen those systainer.
But they are seeking like 210 ou 270 with the systainer, I find a bit pricey, but yeah, you have a nice systainer.

And if I’m adding up the cost of a 50unit box of let’s say 3d cubitron, for 3-4 grit, @ 75ish per box, it’s about the same price at the end.

Didn’t see it that way first -.-‘


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Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1377
Was looking for the ETS 150 too I believe, but figured it was a bit less good “all around” but better in finishing.
Make it a ETS EC 150/5, or buy a ETS EC 125/3 and put a 150 pad on it.

My first sander was a Rotex RO150 too. GREAT SANDER! :) Learn to hold it by the hose for better control. Later I got a ETS EC 150/5 for more comfortable sanding, although not needed it is a nice sander to have even though the RO150 is also a 5mm orbit. So these days I whip out the RO150 when shredding material. Also use it for polishing.

With mesh type sandpaper you also need to use a protection pad.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
Was looking for the ETS 150 too I believe, but figured it was a bit less good “all around” but better in finishing.
Make it a ETS EC 150/5, or buy a ETS EC 125/3 and put a 150 pad on it.

My first sander was a Rotex RO150 too. GREAT SANDER! :) Learn to hold it by the hose for better control. Later I got a ETS EC 150/5 for more comfortable sanding, although not needed it is a nice sander to have even though the RO150 is also a 5mm orbit. So these days I whip out the RO150 when shredding material. Also use it for polishing.

With mesh type sandpaper you also need to use a protection pad.
Did you use your rotex to polish car paint?
I do a bit of car detailing too, and was wondering if I should sell my old DA I was using.


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Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1377
I use my Rotex all the time for polishing cars. Festool does make a special pad for doing so. I use sponges etc from Chemical Guys which can be purchased off Amazon or other places. Also have a 7" polisher that is just rotary for larger surfaces.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
I use my Rotex all the time for polishing cars. Festool does make a special pad for doing so. I use sponges etc from Chemical Guys which can be purchased off Amazon or other places. Also have a 7" polisher that is just rotary for larger surfaces.
And it does a great job?
I could sell my porter cable 7424 and only use the rotex?

How do you make sure wood dust doesn’t get on the car before/while polishing. You spray it with the compressed air before?


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Offline Chainring

  • Posts: 173
There's been threads about using the RO 150 for automotive use. It seems to be really good, though it might not be a replacement for a unit from Flex or Rupes, etc... As a dual function unit, absolutely. Just need to make sure and blow out all the dust before automotive usage.

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
Will make sure to search and read those thread!


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Offline Chainring

  • Posts: 173
If you do end up using it for automotive use, get the green pad Peter_C mentioned. Festool part number 496151.

https://www.festoolusa.com/accessory/496151---pt-stf-d150-fx

Offline sebr023

  • Posts: 20
Thank you!


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Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1377
And it does a great job?
I could sell my porter cable 7424 and only use the rotex?

How do you make sure wood dust doesn’t get on the car before/while polishing. You spray it with the compressed air before?
I would recommend testing both the Porter Cable and Festool side by side and probably keep both anyway, but I did give my Porter Cable to a friend. The RO150 works well for polishing as far as I am concerned. Not my profession or I would have bought a Shinex, or the like professional auto polisher. The 7" polisher I originally bought to keep my boat looking sexy is a Makita non orbital that required finesse. I still use it for boat polishing large surfaces sometimes. Don't currently own a boat :( but the hunt is on for the next RIB project which won't require any polishing fortunately. The smaller RO90 for some is deemed so so. To me it is a very important tool, and used fairly often. It polishes smaller areas the RO150 struggles to get into, along with sanding smaller parts, that often have to be hand held while sanding. Good for faking corners etc.

Changing the pad removes most of the dust, and the hose tubing part detaches from the RO150. Probably should blow it out just to clean it once in a while. Might start doing that. I always worry more about grit already on/in the paint or crevices then wood which is fairly soft. These are not show cars, more like daily drivers that have scrapes. Amazing what a few minutes with a polisher can remove. "Where did the damage go?" Or, "That looks way better", says the happy friend :)