Author Topic: Sanding and refinishing kitchen counter - which Festool sander for all round use  (Read 1305 times)

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Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
The good lady is ready to to have her kitchen counter top sanded down and refinished.
Any suggestions?

Which festool sander would you recommend for this project and doing the same to the pine dinner table top?
And pretty much all round woodworking projects as a hobbyist. 
And not where near even pretending to be a professional.  Other than my dreams.

Pics later if needed.

Thanks in advance.
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Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6629
An ETS 125 or an ETS EC 125 for which you can add a 150 mm pad.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 873
What is the condition of the counter tops? Larger divots will require stripping it further with a course grit. For that I would recommend an RO150 or a ETS 150/5 (Prefer EC myself) to take off the top layer. The larger 150 size with a hard pad will do a better job of keeping the surfaces flat. If it is in good shape and you just need to clean the surfaces Alex's suggestion of the ETS EC 125 with a 150 pad would work, but it is a 3mm orbital.

Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
Please pardon the mess.
We are a family in full lockdown and cleaning day is tomorrow.

Loading these photos was excruciating.

If I recall someone asked to see what condition and maybe size of the kitchen cabinets.
There is a bit more but hopefully this will clarify.

She did want the sliding doors and storage area to be removed.
But I don't see a way to separate without major reno.


« Last Edit: July 31, 2020, 09:40 PM by BarrySumpter »
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Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
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May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7511
I’d attack that with an ETS EC 125 with a 150 mm hard pad. I don’t see any serious divots, it just needs to have the finish stripped.

Like Alex mentioned, that can also be attacked with an ETS 125 or an ETSC 125 it will just be a bit slower.

I’d start at 150/180 and adjust from there.

Offline forestmount

  • Posts: 18
Hi Barry, I would like to see how this turns out. Also what finish are you planing to use? I need to redo our bench tops, we just built a laundry bench, the top turned out good but not great. Main issue was lack of experience with the oil we used. I ended up sanding most of the finish off and going again.


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Offline Peter Parfitt

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Hi @BarrySumpter

I have, and would therefore use, the ETS EC 150. However, from the pictures shown it looks like varnish has been used at some point on the wood. I may be wrong and it could just be a well applied oil finish. I would start at 120 grit Granat (Granat is super and I do not use anything else for wood). If the work is really slow I would be tempted to use the Rotex 150. Either way, use a hard pad for the flat surfaces.

After clearing off the old finish switch to 150 grit. I always use Osmo for such work and would recommend their Top Oil for your kitchen. There is no need to go any finer than 150 grit if you are using Osmo.

Peter

Offline kcufstoidi

  • Posts: 902
No one has asked if you are planning on removing the countertops or sanding in place. While I agree with the recommendations you will also need a sander to get into all the tight stops a circular sander can't get into. This is unless you plan on a lot of hand sanding. If this is the case a rectangular or delta pad may be more what you are looking for. RTS or DTS 400. It also looks like sink removal or lifting will be necessary. Hard to tell but it looks like you have water damage along the glue joints which might need further inspection.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2020, 08:06 AM by kcufstoidi »

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7511
Another thing to keep in mind is if there are some divots/dents in the wooden surface, a lot of those may be removed or lessened with some distilled water, a cotton towel and a steam iron.  [smile]

There seems to be some separation of the glue joint...I don't know how that would be easily remedied.  [sad]

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 530

There seems to be some separation of the glue joint...I don't know how that would be easily remedied.  [sad]

Clean out the cracks as best one can with a tiny chisel or slotted driver, wrap sanding paper and sand in the cracks. Sand same type of wood other places after cleaning out dust bag (No DC). Collect dust and later empty dust bag making a mix of sanding dust with colourless wood glue to make a paste. Then paste and later sand the cracks  [smile]
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 873
Beautiful wood throughout the kitchen area :)

I was taught to rip quickly with a lower grit to keep it flat, then move up grits until it is ready for finish. If it were me I would start at 80 grit with an ETS EC 150/5 sander and a hard pad. If buying a sander the ETS EC 125 with a 150mm hard pad should work. Seems like there are divots and the wood will need a fair amount of course sanding.

If needing to fill, after course sanding off the varnish you can then save the dust to mix with a glue.

Offline fuzzy logic

  • Posts: 357
Just curious. 
Are thinking of doing the edges of counter-top as well? 
If the finish is ever so slightly different to the rest of the units - maybe giving the edges the same finish
will somehow be a visual improvement? 

(Don't even know if the way I worded that made sense...  [unsure])

Richard (UK)

Decent people do the right thing - always?

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 530
Just remembered, If you go the route of using course grit to remove old marks, even and restore the counter top, I would advise to finish manually or with a linear sander with the same or similar grit lengthwise with the grain. This also to ensure to have the surface straight and even.
With random orbital sanders you risk ugly cross grain patterns once the varnish is applied.
Less risk if you work all the way with finer and finer grit.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 7511
Clean out the cracks as best one can with a tiny chisel or slotted driver, wrap sanding paper and sand in the cracks. Sand same type of wood other places after cleaning out dust bag (No DC). Collect dust and later empty dust bag making a mix of sanding dust with colourless wood glue to make a paste. Then paste and later sand the cracks  [smile]

Thanks for that Festita  [smile] ...just like what you'd do for flooring... [doh]

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 530
You’re welcome Cheese!
How often do I not remember the obvious in techniques [poke]
That is even if I’ve done it before..  [big grin]
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
Thanks to all for their expertise and time in responding.
Much apprecaited.

Just purchased the RTSC 400.  And am arranging shipping today.

I see a number of recommendations for the ETS EC 150/5.

Wondering now if anyone would recommend it for a first time all round Festool sander or if I should consider another Festool sander for an all rounder?

« Last Edit: August 02, 2020, 05:22 PM by BarrySumpter »
May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
Bit better pics
May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Thanks to all for their expertise and time in responding.
Much apprecaited.

Just purchased the RTSC 400.  And am arranging shipping today.

I see a number of recommendations for the ETS EC 150/5.

Wondering now if anyone would recommend it for a first time all round Festool sander or if I should consider another Festool sander for an all rounder?

I have the ETS EC 150/3 which I use for 90% of all my sanding. It is exceptional. I only use Granat.

Peter

Offline BarrySumpter

  • Posts: 72
Thanks Peter.
Thanks to all who responded.
Much appreciated.


Finally figured out an easy way to reduce the size of my pics.

This one shows where the top of the bench meets the side and back.
I don't see an easy way to remove the sliding door cupboards.

I'm pretty sure the best easiest way is to just sand the counter top and finish.
And leave the sliding door storage where it is.
And let the new owners sort it out in a couple of years.


 

« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 06:02 AM by BarrySumpter »
May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge