Author Topic: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture  (Read 2538 times)

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« on: June 10, 2021, 11:07 PM »
We've got a bunch of teak furniture that sits on our bluestone patio 365 days a year. The patio is great but it also presents challenges such as water being sucked up the end grain of the chair/table legs from the bluestone surface, and even if the legs are spaced off of the surface of the bluestone, any splashing water on the bluestone also gets sucked up by the end grain on the legs.

If you add in less than great furniture covers and cold, freezing Minnesota winters then you have a recipe for disaster.

I've heard people say that teak doesn't need to be covered/protected and doesn't need to be maintained. "Just let it silver naturally" is a popular expression. Well, I'll present some photos and you can choose what remediations you feel you need to put in place.

Some of this furniture has been around for 17 years and some has been around for 8 years. What's interesting is that there is no direct correlation between years of service and the amount of degradation. It's all premium furniture if you consider Smith & Hawken to be a premium brand.

My initial mission was after many years, to finally tackle this refinishing project and bring every piece of furniture back to some level of visual/tactile acceptance for a long-term solution as time is running out.  [smile]  I knew there were a lot of issues to take care of but never realized the scope of this project until I took a closer look and got out the sander.




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Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 416
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2021, 11:35 PM »
Is a marine-grade sealant the sort of thing that would help take care of the end grain ingestion issues?  Total Boat Penetrating Epoxy is something my brother mentioned to me as an option to preserve the uniquely-shaped hollowed-out log I got from one of our downed trees, but I never really looked that much into it.

Then again, you may already be halfway through the project and just starting a thread to update, so don't mind my thinking-out-loud musings...

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2021, 12:00 AM »
No problem with thinking out loud...sometimes when that's done the answer becomes obvious.  [big grin]

You are correct, in that I was looking for a sealant that would wick up into the table & chair legs and prevent them from further damage. My first thought was to go to the marine industry and see what they had to offer.

After a ton of various claims (both factual and fictitious), I finally settled on this stuff, Smith's CPES.




Offline jeffinsgf

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Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2021, 06:28 AM »
 [popcorn] [popcorn]

Offline Cheese

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Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2021, 09:27 AM »
Just to give a sense of scope to the project the main table is rectangular, 7 feet long but extends to 12'. It has 6 armchairs along with 2 regular chairs.

There are 2 larger club chairs along with a small 2' square table that resides between them.

Finally, there is a chaise lounge that contains a pull-out shelf/tray on each side to hold sunglasses, a book, a beverage...whatever.

This is what the chairs look like from a distance, not too bad, just very rough feeling and rather dirty.




The closer you get though the rougher they look.




These photos aren't from a particular chair, each chair has an issue or several issues that need to be fixed.

Where the arm and the back meet.




Where the arm and the leg meet.




Where the leg, arm & seat meet.




Underneath the arm where it attaches to the arm support.




Here's a weird one, on the uppermost part of the seat back that's somewhat shielded/protected by the top rail of the chair.




The top rail of the chair from the side and from the back.






There was an earlier discussion on the merits of 3M Cubitron sandpaper. I could have used Granat paper on this project as I have a ready supply, however I wanted to give Cubitron a try. I managed to order it in sample packs for only .30 per sheet.






The original thought was to use maybe 180, 220 or 240 on the main surfaces and 80 or 120 on the bottom of the legs that rest on the bluestone.

So far, what's been working well is Cubitron 180 & 220 on the main surfaces and 80 grit on the leg. I've tried Granat but the Cubitron seems to last longer. It's not a huge difference but it is noticeable.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2021, 10:24 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

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Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2021, 10:47 AM »
This is the equipment I'm using so far on the dining table chairs, this may change when I start on the club chairs, the dining table and the chaise lounge. For the larger stuff I'll probably be pulling out the ETS EC 125/150, maybe the RS 2 and the MIDI I.

So for now, it's the DTSC with Granat, ETSC with Cubitron, Festool interface pad with Cubitron, Mirka hand sander with Cubitron & some Granat foam hand squares.




I have noticed that the dust collection with the ETSC/Cubitron combination isn't particularly great, matter of fact it's horrible. However, I kind of expected that the small holes combined with no ACTIVE dust extraction would have its own set of issues. We'll see how much it improves once I bring out the MIDI.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4160
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2021, 12:53 PM »
@Cheese, I've got to ask - how could you characterize the Cubitron vs. Granat, grit-for-grit, extraction aside?   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1088
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2021, 04:28 PM »
Best long term solution is probably going to be Sunbrella covers that get a DWR treatment every couple of years. At least it doesn't snow much in the Twin Cities. Got a heavy duty sewing machine?

My boat had a teak platform. Teak is beautiful once cleaned up. I would let it silver then sand and oil every once in a great while. Epoxy couldn't hold up the scratching a swim platform experiences.

Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 66
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2021, 08:22 PM »
Great choice.  I’ve refinished a number of outdoor items using Smith’s CPES, epoxy putty and Epifanes varnish, and they’re all holding up well.  The main enemy here (CA) is sun and it never freezes, for what that’s worth.  My only complaint about CPES is the VOC content — be sure you get plenty of fresh air while applying it.  Even outdoors I’m in the habit of using a respirator. 
I second the suggestion to get covers. I really like the ones made by KoverRoos; I’ve had several custom ones made, and they are also holding up well.
You might also consider getting a LS sander and the pad you can shape to match the profile of the seat rails.  I think it saved me a fair chunk of hand sanding.
Mario

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3480
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2021, 08:48 PM »
I’d think buy all new.
Birdhunter

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2021, 11:04 PM »
@Cheese, I've got to ask - how could you characterize the Cubitron vs. Granat, grit-for-grit, extraction aside?   [smile]

Hey Sparky @Sparktrician the only way to characterize longevity of sandpaper life is to sand for hours...with the different variants, which I did and which is not fun in 90º weather outside.  [big grin]  The thing I notice with the Cubitron is it stays "sharper" for a longer period of time. Just passing your hand over a used Cubitron disc and you'll notice that it does indeed feel "sharper".

I mentioned earlier an issue with dust collection using the in-machine fan on an ETSC 125 with the small holes in the Cubitron discs. So I broke out the MIDI I today and hooked it up to the ETSC...what a huge difference. Dust was no longer an issue (I originally had piles of the stuff on the patio) and the Cubitron now lasted even longer than it did before. I think I'll be using the MIDI for the rest of the sanding chores.

If you're interested in trying the stuff, you can order sample packs.

#87435 with 5 each of 240, 320 & 400.

#87338 with 3 each of 80, 120, 150 180 & 220.  The price is around 30 cents per disc. Come on, 30 cents per disc is like almost free.  [big grin]



I ordered locally from

https://www.rshughes.com

I'd consider them to be a good vendor...no issues, fast shipment, fair shipping prices.

I checked on Amazon earlier and they priced this stuff like liquid gold...so...similar to the price of Granat.  [big grin]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2021, 11:38 PM »
Best long term solution is probably going to be Sunbrella covers that get a DWR treatment every couple of years. At least it doesn't snow much in the Twin Cities. Got a heavy duty sewing machine?

My boat had a teak platform. Teak is beautiful once cleaned up. I would let it silver then sand and oil every once in a great while. Epoxy couldn't hold up the scratching a swim platform experiences.

Ya, believe it or not this teak grouping has been covered its entire life. The previous covers started with some inexpensive Target items and then I decided to purchase premium covers from, Smith & Hawkins, Restoration Hardware & Thos Baker. Unfortunately, all were water penetrable and thus left visible marks on the furniture and obviously physical damage which meant I had to refinish these items yearly...this post is my attempt to outgrow that nasty habit.

I found a custom cover manufacturer last year and had covers made for all the furniture. My thought was that until I got the furniture cover problem under control, I'd be refinishing this stuff till the day I died...that's not a pleasant thought.

Here's what I decided upon and I'm totally satisfied. I've had them for a year and have no regrets, be aware that if you order the heaviest gauge vinyl like I did, they do become very heavy. The next time I'd opt for the lighter version because high winds are not an issue.

https://www.alcocovers.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIvPn9yJKR8QIVjm5vBB1H8QNGEAAYASAAEgJyUPD_BwE

As far as snowfall is concerned, the average for Minnesota is from 38" to almost 70".  [eek]
« Last Edit: June 12, 2021, 09:55 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2021, 11:56 PM »
I’d think buy all new.

I like that idea because it's easy...however, my wallet likes it not so much.  [smile]

Between the teak furniture, the individual cushions that are always an option and the custom furniture covers, we're looking at an expenditure of somewhere between $12K to $15K. Not an insignificant amount of chump change for a retired guy. I guess I'll just carry on with the elbow grease, sweat equity and the purchase of more 3M sanding discs.

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 327
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2021, 06:50 AM »
I have a garden table with teak slats on it that sits outside the whole year. During the summer it is exposed to the weather. During the winter it is stored in an open shed (only a back wall and one side wall). No covers are used. Since I started using Osmo I have seen no degradation at all. I refinish the table about once every three years, but that is more out of habit and being cautious, than that it is due to the finish wearing out. It does not crack, nor does it peel off. In other words, I am quit happy with it. Maybe it is something for you as well?

I think (not 100% sure) these are the US equivalents of the products I use (strangely the names given on the US site are in German...):

Terrassen-Öl (despite the name it is not only for decking)

Holz-Imprägnierung WR (I use it to treat end grain before using the öl)

UV-Schutz-Öl/Extra (beware though, this one give a satin shine to your surfaces)

Just a thought...

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 805
  • Michigan
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2021, 07:12 AM »
On my boats I always used something like this

https://www.totalboat.com/product/2-part-teak-cleaner/

Teak doesn't weather to the silver color talked about because of all the pollutants in the air these days.  Instead it goes to gray and blotchy black.

The cleaner/brighteners do an amazing job of restoring the teak color/appearance with comparatively little effort compared to sanding.  You will still need to sand afterwards to smooth the grain as the cleaner doesn't affect the raised and weathered grain but it will be less sanding than try to clean it up by sanding.

If you plan to finish the teak in any way take a look at Sikkens cetol.  It holds up better than spar varnish and is a lot less work to apply. 

Fred



Fred

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2021, 11:16 AM »
Since I started using Osmo I have seen no degradation at all. I refinish the table about once every three years, but that is more out of habit and being cautious, than that it is due to the finish wearing out. It does not crack, nor does it peel off. In other words, I am quit happy with it. Maybe it is something for you as well?

I think (not 100% sure) these are the US equivalents of the products I use (strangely the names given on the US site are in German...):

Terrassen-Öl (despite the name it is not only for decking)

Holz-Imprägnierung WR (I use it to treat end grain before using the öl)

UV-Schutz-Öl/Extra (beware though, this one give a satin shine to your surfaces)

Just a thought...

Thanks for the info on Osmo I will check out their products. Even though I've committed to certain wood treatments now, they are certainly not cast in stone and they'll probably change as I monitor & watch the results of this refinishing project. I view this project as a starting point only as exterior wood finish products seem to be getting better all the time.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2021, 11:30 AM »
On my boats I always used something like this

https://www.totalboat.com/product/2-part-teak-cleaner/

If you plan to finish the teak in any way take a look at Sikkens cetol.  It holds up better than spar varnish and is a lot less work to apply. 

Ya, I'm familiar with TotalBoat products. Good to know that their 2-part teak cleaner works well. I'll pick some up and try it. I was actually looking at the TotalBoat penetrating epoxy first before I decided to use the Smith's CPES.

Is there a particular Sikkens Cetol that you're familiar with? They offer 19 different flavors.  [smile]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2021, 11:54 AM »
Great choice.  I’ve refinished a number of outdoor items using Smith’s CPES, epoxy putty and Epifanes varnish, and they’re all holding up well. 

You might also consider getting a LS sander and the pad you can shape to match the profile of the seat rails.  I think it saved me a fair chunk of hand sanding.

Interesting idea about using the LS 130 for the seat and chair back rails, thanks, that never occurred to me. As luck would have it, I already own a LS so I just need to purchase the profile kit for it.  [smile]

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 346
Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2021, 12:01 PM »
I did a similar project last year on 12 year old Kwila furniture. No snow here but hot Aussie sun and plenty of rain.

Sanded back with RO150 using 80, 120, 150 plus the DTS for the chairs with same grits, both using the MIDI. Great dust extraction. The RO150 was fantastic for this.

Used Osmo Outdoor plus UV protect to finish. Looked great when done. Don’t know how it’s holding up because I sold it when finished tho, but used the same finish on the new table I made from New Guinea Rosewood so will see how that goes, albeit it is under cover now.








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« Last Edit: June 12, 2021, 12:07 PM by CeeJay »

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 346
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2021, 12:09 PM »
The patio is now covered but you can see the new table. Still gets a bit of rain in storms, and is exposed to the morning sun.




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Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 469
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2021, 12:43 PM »
The patio is now covered but you can see the new table. Still gets a bit of rain in storms, and is exposed to the morning sun.


@CeeJay setting aside the fine workmanship on the table and your success w/ the Osmo UV product, that is a stunning patio.  I am envious.


Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 346
Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2021, 07:47 PM »
setting aside the fine workmanship on the table and your success w/ the Osmo UV product, that is a stunning patio.  I am envious.

Thanks! It’s made a huge difference. Rather than sitting out in the garden once a month or so it’s now 2-3 times a week.

Can’t take credit for the construction. The guys who originally built our house put it together.

I do have the breakfast bar to construct next tho….


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« Last Edit: June 12, 2021, 08:33 PM by CeeJay »

Offline Cheese

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Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2021, 11:29 PM »
That outside area is really nice...would kill for. That's my style, very very nice.  [big grin]


« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 10:57 AM by Cheese »

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1088
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2021, 03:30 AM »
Unfortunately, all were water penetrable and thus left visible marks on the furniture and obviously physical damage which meant I had to refinish these items yearly...this post is my attempt to outgrow that nasty habit.

I found a custom cover manufacturer last year and had covers made for all the furniture. My thought was that until I got the furniture cover problem under control, I'd be refinishing this stuff till the day I died...that's not a pleasant thought.
Even Sunbrella which is the standard for the marine industry must have a DWR (Durable water repellent.) If it needs to be done yearly so be it. I stored my boat outside full sun in California. Normally we actually do get rain here, although the storms in MN enthralled me. I would wash my cover in an industrial machine at a laundry mat, using something like Woolite or Nikwash wash. After washing the cover, apply Nikwax to the load. The difference in water repellency after was night and day. Sunbrella is breathable which is what keeps the mold down. Gortex chair covers might be a little expensive.

For clothing, especially for rain coats in MN, I'd first wash a couple of loads, then add the DWR to the load and run the machine but wouldn't let it drain. You can run a whole bunch of clothing thru on a single bottle.
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-TX-Direct-Wash-in-Waterproofing/dp/B07P61CQ96
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-Hardshell-Cleaning-Waterproofing-DUO-Pack/dp/B000PGOOIS/ref=pd_lpo_card_3?pd_rd_i=B000PGOOIS&psc=1

Vinyl would still need the thread penetrations sealed with a seam sealant. Aquaseal mixed with Cotol240 to thin it works great, or buy the single part tent seam sealer. in maintaining multiple drysuits (White water kayaking in MN after the ice breaks up can be cold), so I buy the BIG tubes of Aquaseal and freeze it between uses. Last for years that way. The quart of Cotol240 lasts years to. Sometimes it is a 50/50 mix for penetration, or for a fast dry time to get back in the water.

Here's what I decided upon and I'm totally satisfied. I've had them for a year and have no regrets, be aware that if you order the heaviest gauge vinyl like I did, they do become very heavy. The next time I'd opt for the lighter version because high winds are not an issue.

https://www.alcocovers.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIvPn9yJKR8QIVjm5vBB1H8QNGEAAYASAAEgJyUPD_BwE
I buy rolls of Sunbrella from Ebay for cheap when needed. Having an industrial sewing machine opens up lots of options. When I actually have some free time I plan to make a hanging chair. Hmmm...I should start looking for the right hard piece of oak still somewhere in a tree as I have been trimming them back and removing dead branches for fire prevention along with tree health. I chipped up a bunch that were dry and hard as a hickory baseball bat or so it seemed. Gotta start using more local resources.

As far as snowfall is concerned, the average for Minnesota is from 38" to almost 70".  [eek]
I was freaked out when I moved to MN because of the winters. Turned out other than being cold, it's icy sometimes even with salt, but the snow storms were often pretty tame. Used to sit on the couch and enjoy them while toasty warm. A couple years in MN there wasn't enough snow to go cross country skiing more than a couple times in the winter. Being from NorCal..."Lake Tahoe gets an average of 215.4 inches of snowfall, or a little under 18 feet. Upper elevations can get between 300 and 500 inches per year." I really didn't need my Audi Quattro in MN but sometimes it was nice to have. My wife took the campus connector to the lab most every day so she rarely drove, other than to the store, and she got exercise walking to the bus stop.

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 805
  • Michigan
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2021, 07:28 AM »
On my boats I always used something like this

https://www.totalboat.com/product/2-part-teak-cleaner/

If you plan to finish the teak in any way take a look at Sikkens cetol.  It holds up better than spar varnish and is a lot less work to apply. 

Ya, I'm familiar with TotalBoat products. Good to know that their 2-part teak cleaner works well. I'll pick some up and try it. I was actually looking at the TotalBoat penetrating epoxy first before I decided to use the Smith's CPES.

Is there a particular Sikkens Cetol that you're familiar with? They offer 19 different flavors.  [smile]

I'm using this

https://www.amazon.com/Interlux-IVA316-QT-Natural-Fluid_Ounces/dp/B0017KQKX8

Fred
« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 07:32 AM by bruegf »
Fred

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2021, 10:55 AM »
For clothing, especially for rain coats in MN, I'd first wash a couple of loads, then add the DWR to the load and run the machine but wouldn't let it drain. You can run a whole bunch of clothing thru on a single bottle.
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-TX-Direct-Wash-in-Waterproofing/dp/B07P61CQ96
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-Hardshell-Cleaning-Waterproofing-DUO-Pack/dp/B000PGOOIS/ref=pd_lpo_card_3?pd_rd_i=B000PGOOIS&psc=1

Interesting...didn't know that even existed.  [smile]  Thanks, there could be a lot uses for that stuff.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2021, 11:14 AM »
I'm using this

https://www.amazon.com/Interlux-IVA316-QT-Natural-Fluid_Ounces/dp/B0017KQKX8


Thanks...that seems very similar to the Star Brite product I'm using. Last spring I sanded the table legs and applied this stuff.



Typically I oil or use Surfix on the legs but that stuff only lasts for 3-4 months before it starts to go away. Short unexpected rain showers, splash back from the patio and my wife with a garden hose all take their toll. The legs water stain, then turn brown/black and finally become rough probably because of the raised grain.

So I sanded the legs and applied Star Brite. One year later the legs still look like they did last spring. No stains, a uniform color and the surface is still smooth. After those results I decided to use Star Brite or Sikkens on the structural parts of the table and then use Surfix on the table top. That way the largest area that's visible has that luxurious look and smooth feel of a oiled/waxed finish.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2021, 10:50 PM »
So, after the first look-see of the teak furniture, I detected many areas that needed attention. The question then became where do you start and what is the largest potential for failure if something is not done.

I decided that the end grain of the table legs & chair legs presented the largest liability. Once those things go soft, the only solution is to start cutting them back to good wood.

Also, knowing that it takes days to dry out the end grain, that also prompted me to attack those areas first as we'd had a week of very hot & dry weather. So, first thing is to mask the legs and sand them with 80 grit to prepare them for the epoxy.

Here's a shot of 32 of the legs masked and pointed to the heavens for drying.




The issue is that despite the fact that I installed 1/4" thick glides on every leg, the bounce-back of the rain from the patio still got sucked up into the legs and most of them started to split. Here's a shot of the leg from the chaise lounge with the glide still installed, notice the 2 cracks.



The epoxy I decided to use is Smith's Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer™, there has been some testing done and it will wick into the endgrain of wood up to 12". The drill I followed, was to use a foam brush and dab a large dose of the EPES on every leg and then minutes later apply another dose. Continue to do this until the leg surface begins to gloss over. I think I averaged 7-8 coatings before the legs refused to absorb more CPES. This stuff is quite popular in the wooden boat market.

http://www.smithandcompany.org/CPES/


Here's a shot of the bottom of a leg after 7-8 coats of CPES. Note the original nail hole for the glide that I attached years ago.

« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 10:53 PM by Cheese »

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 346
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2021, 02:36 AM »
I watched a Wood Whisperer video about outdoor furniture. He tapes the ends of the legs and pours a solid ‘foot’ of epoxy about 5-10mm thick to seal the ends.

He’s in Colorado and seemed pretty positive about the results after a few years.


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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8567
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2021, 10:41 AM »
I watched a Wood Whisperer video about outdoor furniture. He tapes the ends of the legs and pours a solid ‘foot’ of epoxy about 5-10mm thick to seal the ends.

He’s in Colorado and seemed pretty positive about the results after a few years.


That's good to know, seems like I'm on the right path.  [smile]  I'll be reinstalling new glides on all of the legs, that keeps the epoxied bottom about 1/4" above the blue stone surface. It also means that as the chairs are slid across the stone surface, any wear will be on the glides and not on the epoxied legs.

When I removed all of the old glides, probably 40% of them were worn down to the surface of the nail head that attaches them, so glides do prevent a lot of wear on the chair legs. The glides also dramatically reduced the legs from chipping.