Author Topic: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture  (Read 11351 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« on: June 10, 2021, 11:07 PM »
We've got a bunch of teak furniture that sits on our bluestone patio 365 days a year. The patio is great but it also presents challenges such as water being sucked up the end grain of the chair/table legs from the bluestone surface, and even if the legs are spaced off of the surface of the bluestone, any splashing water on the bluestone also gets sucked up by the end grain on the legs.

If you add in less than great furniture covers and cold, freezing Minnesota winters then you have a recipe for disaster.

I've heard people say that teak doesn't need to be covered/protected and doesn't need to be maintained. "Just let it silver naturally" is a popular expression. Well, I'll present some photos and you can choose what remediations you feel you need to put in place.

Some of this furniture has been around for 17 years and some has been around for 8 years. What's interesting is that there is no direct correlation between years of service and the amount of degradation. It's all premium furniture if you consider Smith & Hawken to be a premium brand.

My initial mission was after many years, to finally tackle this refinishing project and bring every piece of furniture back to some level of visual/tactile acceptance for a long-term solution as time is running out.  [smile]  I knew there were a lot of issues to take care of but never realized the scope of this project until I took a closer look and got out the sander.




Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 775
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2021, 11:35 PM »
Is a marine-grade sealant the sort of thing that would help take care of the end grain ingestion issues?  Total Boat Penetrating Epoxy is something my brother mentioned to me as an option to preserve the uniquely-shaped hollowed-out log I got from one of our downed trees, but I never really looked that much into it.

Then again, you may already be halfway through the project and just starting a thread to update, so don't mind my thinking-out-loud musings...

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2021, 12:00 AM »
No problem with thinking out loud...sometimes when that's done the answer becomes obvious.  [big grin]

You are correct, in that I was looking for a sealant that would wick up into the table & chair legs and prevent them from further damage. My first thought was to go to the marine industry and see what they had to offer.

After a ton of various claims (both factual and fictitious), I finally settled on this stuff, Smith's CPES.




Online jeffinsgf

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 428
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2021, 06:28 AM »
 [popcorn] [popcorn]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2021, 09:27 AM »
Just to give a sense of scope to the project the main table is rectangular, 7 feet long but extends to 12'. It has 6 armchairs along with 2 regular chairs.

There are 2 larger club chairs along with a small 2' square table that resides between them.

Finally, there is a chaise lounge that contains a pull-out shelf/tray on each side to hold sunglasses, a book, a beverage...whatever.

This is what the chairs look like from a distance, not too bad, just very rough feeling and rather dirty.




The closer you get though the rougher they look.




These photos aren't from a particular chair, each chair has an issue or several issues that need to be fixed.

Where the arm and the back meet.




Where the arm and the leg meet.




Where the leg, arm & seat meet.




Underneath the arm where it attaches to the arm support.




Here's a weird one, on the uppermost part of the seat back that's somewhat shielded/protected by the top rail of the chair.




The top rail of the chair from the side and from the back.






There was an earlier discussion on the merits of 3M Cubitron sandpaper. I could have used Granat paper on this project as I have a ready supply, however I wanted to give Cubitron a try. I managed to order it in sample packs for only .30 per sheet.






The original thought was to use maybe 180, 220 or 240 on the main surfaces and 80 or 120 on the bottom of the legs that rest on the bluestone.

So far, what's been working well is Cubitron 180 & 220 on the main surfaces and 80 grit on the leg. I've tried Granat but the Cubitron seems to last longer. It's not a huge difference but it is noticeable.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2021, 10:24 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2021, 10:47 AM »
This is the equipment I'm using so far on the dining table chairs, this may change when I start on the club chairs, the dining table and the chaise lounge. For the larger stuff I'll probably be pulling out the ETS EC 125/150, maybe the RS 2 and the MIDI I.

So for now, it's the DTSC with Granat, ETSC with Cubitron, Festool interface pad with Cubitron, Mirka hand sander with Cubitron & some Granat foam hand squares.




I have noticed that the dust collection with the ETSC/Cubitron combination isn't particularly great, matter of fact it's horrible. However, I kind of expected that the small holes combined with no ACTIVE dust extraction would have its own set of issues. We'll see how much it improves once I bring out the MIDI.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4187
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2021, 12:53 PM »
@Cheese, I've got to ask - how could you characterize the Cubitron vs. Granat, grit-for-grit, extraction aside?   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1159
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2021, 04:28 PM »
Best long term solution is probably going to be Sunbrella covers that get a DWR treatment every couple of years. At least it doesn't snow much in the Twin Cities. Got a heavy duty sewing machine?

My boat had a teak platform. Teak is beautiful once cleaned up. I would let it silver then sand and oil every once in a great while. Epoxy couldn't hold up the scratching a swim platform experiences.

Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 72
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2021, 08:22 PM »
Great choice.  I’ve refinished a number of outdoor items using Smith’s CPES, epoxy putty and Epifanes varnish, and they’re all holding up well.  The main enemy here (CA) is sun and it never freezes, for what that’s worth.  My only complaint about CPES is the VOC content — be sure you get plenty of fresh air while applying it.  Even outdoors I’m in the habit of using a respirator. 
I second the suggestion to get covers. I really like the ones made by KoverRoos; I’ve had several custom ones made, and they are also holding up well.
You might also consider getting a LS sander and the pad you can shape to match the profile of the seat rails.  I think it saved me a fair chunk of hand sanding.
Mario

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 3545
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2021, 08:48 PM »
I’d think buy all new.
Birdhunter

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2021, 11:04 PM »
@Cheese, I've got to ask - how could you characterize the Cubitron vs. Granat, grit-for-grit, extraction aside?   [smile]

Hey Sparky @Sparktrician the only way to characterize longevity of sandpaper life is to sand for hours...with the different variants, which I did and which is not fun in 90º weather outside.  [big grin]  The thing I notice with the Cubitron is it stays "sharper" for a longer period of time. Just passing your hand over a used Cubitron disc and you'll notice that it does indeed feel "sharper".

I mentioned earlier an issue with dust collection using the in-machine fan on an ETSC 125 with the small holes in the Cubitron discs. So I broke out the MIDI I today and hooked it up to the ETSC...what a huge difference. Dust was no longer an issue (I originally had piles of the stuff on the patio) and the Cubitron now lasted even longer than it did before. I think I'll be using the MIDI for the rest of the sanding chores.

If you're interested in trying the stuff, you can order sample packs.

#87435 with 5 each of 240, 320 & 400.

#87338 with 3 each of 80, 120, 150 180 & 220.  The price is around 30 cents per disc. Come on, 30 cents per disc is like almost free.  [big grin]



I ordered locally from

https://www.rshughes.com

I'd consider them to be a good vendor...no issues, fast shipment, fair shipping prices.

I checked on Amazon earlier and they priced this stuff like liquid gold...so...similar to the price of Granat.  [big grin]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2021, 11:38 PM »
Best long term solution is probably going to be Sunbrella covers that get a DWR treatment every couple of years. At least it doesn't snow much in the Twin Cities. Got a heavy duty sewing machine?

My boat had a teak platform. Teak is beautiful once cleaned up. I would let it silver then sand and oil every once in a great while. Epoxy couldn't hold up the scratching a swim platform experiences.

Ya, believe it or not this teak grouping has been covered its entire life. The previous covers started with some inexpensive Target items and then I decided to purchase premium covers from, Smith & Hawkins, Restoration Hardware & Thos Baker. Unfortunately, all were water penetrable and thus left visible marks on the furniture and obviously physical damage which meant I had to refinish these items yearly...this post is my attempt to outgrow that nasty habit.

I found a custom cover manufacturer last year and had covers made for all the furniture. My thought was that until I got the furniture cover problem under control, I'd be refinishing this stuff till the day I died...that's not a pleasant thought.

Here's what I decided upon and I'm totally satisfied. I've had them for a year and have no regrets, be aware that if you order the heaviest gauge vinyl like I did, they do become very heavy. The next time I'd opt for the lighter version because high winds are not an issue.

https://www.alcocovers.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIvPn9yJKR8QIVjm5vBB1H8QNGEAAYASAAEgJyUPD_BwE

As far as snowfall is concerned, the average for Minnesota is from 38" to almost 70".  [eek]
« Last Edit: June 12, 2021, 09:55 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2021, 11:56 PM »
I’d think buy all new.

I like that idea because it's easy...however, my wallet likes it not so much.  [smile]

Between the teak furniture, the individual cushions that are always an option and the custom furniture covers, we're looking at an expenditure of somewhere between $12K to $15K. Not an insignificant amount of chump change for a retired guy. I guess I'll just carry on with the elbow grease, sweat equity and the purchase of more 3M sanding discs.

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 353
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2021, 06:50 AM »
I have a garden table with teak slats on it that sits outside the whole year. During the summer it is exposed to the weather. During the winter it is stored in an open shed (only a back wall and one side wall). No covers are used. Since I started using Osmo I have seen no degradation at all. I refinish the table about once every three years, but that is more out of habit and being cautious, than that it is due to the finish wearing out. It does not crack, nor does it peel off. In other words, I am quit happy with it. Maybe it is something for you as well?

I think (not 100% sure) these are the US equivalents of the products I use (strangely the names given on the US site are in German...):

Terrassen-Öl (despite the name it is not only for decking)

Holz-Imprägnierung WR (I use it to treat end grain before using the öl)

UV-Schutz-Öl/Extra (beware though, this one give a satin shine to your surfaces)

Just a thought...

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 810
  • Michigan
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2021, 07:12 AM »
On my boats I always used something like this

https://www.totalboat.com/product/2-part-teak-cleaner/

Teak doesn't weather to the silver color talked about because of all the pollutants in the air these days.  Instead it goes to gray and blotchy black.

The cleaner/brighteners do an amazing job of restoring the teak color/appearance with comparatively little effort compared to sanding.  You will still need to sand afterwards to smooth the grain as the cleaner doesn't affect the raised and weathered grain but it will be less sanding than try to clean it up by sanding.

If you plan to finish the teak in any way take a look at Sikkens cetol.  It holds up better than spar varnish and is a lot less work to apply. 

Fred



Fred

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2021, 11:16 AM »
Since I started using Osmo I have seen no degradation at all. I refinish the table about once every three years, but that is more out of habit and being cautious, than that it is due to the finish wearing out. It does not crack, nor does it peel off. In other words, I am quit happy with it. Maybe it is something for you as well?

I think (not 100% sure) these are the US equivalents of the products I use (strangely the names given on the US site are in German...):

Terrassen-Öl (despite the name it is not only for decking)

Holz-Imprägnierung WR (I use it to treat end grain before using the öl)

UV-Schutz-Öl/Extra (beware though, this one give a satin shine to your surfaces)

Just a thought...

Thanks for the info on Osmo I will check out their products. Even though I've committed to certain wood treatments now, they are certainly not cast in stone and they'll probably change as I monitor & watch the results of this refinishing project. I view this project as a starting point only as exterior wood finish products seem to be getting better all the time.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2021, 11:30 AM »
On my boats I always used something like this

https://www.totalboat.com/product/2-part-teak-cleaner/

If you plan to finish the teak in any way take a look at Sikkens cetol.  It holds up better than spar varnish and is a lot less work to apply. 

Ya, I'm familiar with TotalBoat products. Good to know that their 2-part teak cleaner works well. I'll pick some up and try it. I was actually looking at the TotalBoat penetrating epoxy first before I decided to use the Smith's CPES.

Is there a particular Sikkens Cetol that you're familiar with? They offer 19 different flavors.  [smile]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2021, 11:54 AM »
Great choice.  I’ve refinished a number of outdoor items using Smith’s CPES, epoxy putty and Epifanes varnish, and they’re all holding up well. 

You might also consider getting a LS sander and the pad you can shape to match the profile of the seat rails.  I think it saved me a fair chunk of hand sanding.

Interesting idea about using the LS 130 for the seat and chair back rails, thanks, that never occurred to me. As luck would have it, I already own a LS so I just need to purchase the profile kit for it.  [smile]

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 375
Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2021, 12:01 PM »
I did a similar project last year on 12 year old Kwila furniture. No snow here but hot Aussie sun and plenty of rain.

Sanded back with RO150 using 80, 120, 150 plus the DTS for the chairs with same grits, both using the MIDI. Great dust extraction. The RO150 was fantastic for this.

Used Osmo Outdoor plus UV protect to finish. Looked great when done. Don’t know how it’s holding up because I sold it when finished tho, but used the same finish on the new table I made from New Guinea Rosewood so will see how that goes, albeit it is under cover now.








Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk in
« Last Edit: June 12, 2021, 12:07 PM by CeeJay »

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 375
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2021, 12:09 PM »
The patio is now covered but you can see the new table. Still gets a bit of rain in storms, and is exposed to the morning sun.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 488
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2021, 12:43 PM »
The patio is now covered but you can see the new table. Still gets a bit of rain in storms, and is exposed to the morning sun.


@CeeJay setting aside the fine workmanship on the table and your success w/ the Osmo UV product, that is a stunning patio.  I am envious.


Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 375
Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2021, 07:47 PM »
setting aside the fine workmanship on the table and your success w/ the Osmo UV product, that is a stunning patio.  I am envious.

Thanks! It’s made a huge difference. Rather than sitting out in the garden once a month or so it’s now 2-3 times a week.

Can’t take credit for the construction. The guys who originally built our house put it together.

I do have the breakfast bar to construct next tho….


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: June 12, 2021, 08:33 PM by CeeJay »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2021, 11:29 PM »
That outside area is really nice...would kill for. That's my style, very very nice.  [big grin]


« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 10:57 AM by Cheese »

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1159
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2021, 03:30 AM »
Unfortunately, all were water penetrable and thus left visible marks on the furniture and obviously physical damage which meant I had to refinish these items yearly...this post is my attempt to outgrow that nasty habit.

I found a custom cover manufacturer last year and had covers made for all the furniture. My thought was that until I got the furniture cover problem under control, I'd be refinishing this stuff till the day I died...that's not a pleasant thought.
Even Sunbrella which is the standard for the marine industry must have a DWR (Durable water repellent.) If it needs to be done yearly so be it. I stored my boat outside full sun in California. Normally we actually do get rain here, although the storms in MN enthralled me. I would wash my cover in an industrial machine at a laundry mat, using something like Woolite or Nikwash wash. After washing the cover, apply Nikwax to the load. The difference in water repellency after was night and day. Sunbrella is breathable which is what keeps the mold down. Gortex chair covers might be a little expensive.

For clothing, especially for rain coats in MN, I'd first wash a couple of loads, then add the DWR to the load and run the machine but wouldn't let it drain. You can run a whole bunch of clothing thru on a single bottle.
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-TX-Direct-Wash-in-Waterproofing/dp/B07P61CQ96
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-Hardshell-Cleaning-Waterproofing-DUO-Pack/dp/B000PGOOIS/ref=pd_lpo_card_3?pd_rd_i=B000PGOOIS&psc=1

Vinyl would still need the thread penetrations sealed with a seam sealant. Aquaseal mixed with Cotol240 to thin it works great, or buy the single part tent seam sealer. in maintaining multiple drysuits (White water kayaking in MN after the ice breaks up can be cold), so I buy the BIG tubes of Aquaseal and freeze it between uses. Last for years that way. The quart of Cotol240 lasts years to. Sometimes it is a 50/50 mix for penetration, or for a fast dry time to get back in the water.

Here's what I decided upon and I'm totally satisfied. I've had them for a year and have no regrets, be aware that if you order the heaviest gauge vinyl like I did, they do become very heavy. The next time I'd opt for the lighter version because high winds are not an issue.

https://www.alcocovers.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIvPn9yJKR8QIVjm5vBB1H8QNGEAAYASAAEgJyUPD_BwE
I buy rolls of Sunbrella from Ebay for cheap when needed. Having an industrial sewing machine opens up lots of options. When I actually have some free time I plan to make a hanging chair. Hmmm...I should start looking for the right hard piece of oak still somewhere in a tree as I have been trimming them back and removing dead branches for fire prevention along with tree health. I chipped up a bunch that were dry and hard as a hickory baseball bat or so it seemed. Gotta start using more local resources.

As far as snowfall is concerned, the average for Minnesota is from 38" to almost 70".  [eek]
I was freaked out when I moved to MN because of the winters. Turned out other than being cold, it's icy sometimes even with salt, but the snow storms were often pretty tame. Used to sit on the couch and enjoy them while toasty warm. A couple years in MN there wasn't enough snow to go cross country skiing more than a couple times in the winter. Being from NorCal..."Lake Tahoe gets an average of 215.4 inches of snowfall, or a little under 18 feet. Upper elevations can get between 300 and 500 inches per year." I really didn't need my Audi Quattro in MN but sometimes it was nice to have. My wife took the campus connector to the lab most every day so she rarely drove, other than to the store, and she got exercise walking to the bus stop.

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 810
  • Michigan
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2021, 07:28 AM »
On my boats I always used something like this

https://www.totalboat.com/product/2-part-teak-cleaner/

If you plan to finish the teak in any way take a look at Sikkens cetol.  It holds up better than spar varnish and is a lot less work to apply. 

Ya, I'm familiar with TotalBoat products. Good to know that their 2-part teak cleaner works well. I'll pick some up and try it. I was actually looking at the TotalBoat penetrating epoxy first before I decided to use the Smith's CPES.

Is there a particular Sikkens Cetol that you're familiar with? They offer 19 different flavors.  [smile]

I'm using this

https://www.amazon.com/Interlux-IVA316-QT-Natural-Fluid_Ounces/dp/B0017KQKX8

Fred
« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 07:32 AM by bruegf »
Fred

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2021, 10:55 AM »
For clothing, especially for rain coats in MN, I'd first wash a couple of loads, then add the DWR to the load and run the machine but wouldn't let it drain. You can run a whole bunch of clothing thru on a single bottle.
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-TX-Direct-Wash-in-Waterproofing/dp/B07P61CQ96
https://www.amazon.com/Nikwax-Hardshell-Cleaning-Waterproofing-DUO-Pack/dp/B000PGOOIS/ref=pd_lpo_card_3?pd_rd_i=B000PGOOIS&psc=1

Interesting...didn't know that even existed.  [smile]  Thanks, there could be a lot uses for that stuff.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2021, 11:14 AM »
I'm using this

https://www.amazon.com/Interlux-IVA316-QT-Natural-Fluid_Ounces/dp/B0017KQKX8


Thanks...that seems very similar to the Star Brite product I'm using. Last spring I sanded the table legs and applied this stuff.



Typically I oil or use Surfix on the legs but that stuff only lasts for 3-4 months before it starts to go away. Short unexpected rain showers, splash back from the patio and my wife with a garden hose all take their toll. The legs water stain, then turn brown/black and finally become rough probably because of the raised grain.

So I sanded the legs and applied Star Brite. One year later the legs still look like they did last spring. No stains, a uniform color and the surface is still smooth. After those results I decided to use Star Brite or Sikkens on the structural parts of the table and then use Surfix on the table top. That way the largest area that's visible has that luxurious look and smooth feel of a oiled/waxed finish.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2021, 10:50 PM »
So, after the first look-see of the teak furniture, I detected many areas that needed attention. The question then became where do you start and what is the largest potential for failure if something is not done.

I decided that the end grain of the table legs & chair legs presented the largest liability. Once those things go soft, the only solution is to start cutting them back to good wood.

Also, knowing that it takes days to dry out the end grain, that also prompted me to attack those areas first as we'd had a week of very hot & dry weather. So, first thing is to mask the legs and sand them with 80 grit to prepare them for the epoxy.

Here's a shot of 32 of the legs masked and pointed to the heavens for drying.




The issue is that despite the fact that I installed 1/4" thick glides on every leg, the bounce-back of the rain from the patio still got sucked up into the legs and most of them started to split. Here's a shot of the leg from the chaise lounge with the glide still installed, notice the 2 cracks.



The epoxy I decided to use is Smith's Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer™, there has been some testing done and it will wick into the endgrain of wood up to 12". The drill I followed, was to use a foam brush and dab a large dose of the EPES on every leg and then minutes later apply another dose. Continue to do this until the leg surface begins to gloss over. I think I averaged 7-8 coatings before the legs refused to absorb more CPES. This stuff is quite popular in the wooden boat market.

http://www.smithandcompany.org/CPES/


Here's a shot of the bottom of a leg after 7-8 coats of CPES. Note the original nail hole for the glide that I attached years ago.

« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 10:53 PM by Cheese »

Offline CeeJay

  • Posts: 375
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2021, 02:36 AM »
I watched a Wood Whisperer video about outdoor furniture. He tapes the ends of the legs and pours a solid ‘foot’ of epoxy about 5-10mm thick to seal the ends.

He’s in Colorado and seemed pretty positive about the results after a few years.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2021, 10:41 AM »
I watched a Wood Whisperer video about outdoor furniture. He tapes the ends of the legs and pours a solid ‘foot’ of epoxy about 5-10mm thick to seal the ends.

He’s in Colorado and seemed pretty positive about the results after a few years.


That's good to know, seems like I'm on the right path.  [smile]  I'll be reinstalling new glides on all of the legs, that keeps the epoxied bottom about 1/4" above the blue stone surface. It also means that as the chairs are slid across the stone surface, any wear will be on the glides and not on the epoxied legs.

When I removed all of the old glides, probably 40% of them were worn down to the surface of the nail head that attaches them, so glides do prevent a lot of wear on the chair legs. The glides also dramatically reduced the legs from chipping.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2021, 11:22 AM »
So as I mentioned earlier, all of the dining table chair legs have been epoxied and new glides installed, that means the chairs can be repositioned around the table, right side up and covered if necessary.

So, on to the chaise lounge which has 2 legs and 2 wheels. The wheels have end grain on 2 sides (obviously) and are in pretty rough shape. The plan is to epoxy the 2 legs and epoxy the entire wheel along with a small end grain surface that faces the bluestone.

While looking at removing the wheel assembly I noticed a crack in the frame of the chaise lounge on both sides. So this entire wheel assembly will need to be removed to work on the wheels and repair the frame.








I'll need to drill out the teak dowels to remove the wheel assembly.






The wheel assembly was attached in a rather unique manner, a tenon and a large dowel along with the 2 small 8 mm dowels.





« Last Edit: June 14, 2021, 03:34 PM by Cheese »

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2021, 08:49 PM »
So, slowly but surely I'm working my way through these teak "left au naturel" issues. Here's an earlier shot of one of the the chaise lounge feet that had a glide attached for 10-15 years. Despite the leg being elevated off the patio surface, because the teak is untreated end grain, the splash back of rain on the patio still cracked the leg in two places. 




This photo shows what the leg looks like after 6 applications of Smith's CPES. This stuff just keeps absorbing into the grain, both face grain and end grain. If I remember correctly, up to 12" in DAMAGED end grain and up to 2" in DAMAGED face grain.




This photo is after 8 applications of CPES when the internal wicking finally stopped. I then added the new glide. So, one leg finished, only 49 left to go.  [smile]

« Last Edit: June 19, 2021, 11:17 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #32 on: June 17, 2021, 10:57 PM »
As mentioned earlier, the top part of the chair back has the most exposure to weather and is also most vulnerable to leaky furniture covers. If the cover leaks, the cover becomes saturated with water and just continually transfers that moisture to the top of the chair back which is end grain wood.  [eek]

Thus, cracks develop and some of them are severe. Here's a small one but even small ones are all over the top of the chair...on every chair. After looking at the 8 dining table chairs plus the 2 club chairs and finding cracks in all the top rails, I decided to coat every top chair end grain rail with CPES to seal up the surface. Here's what it looks like.




The nice thing about this product is that it wicks into the interior surface so that you can remove the glaze coat from the outside surface but it will still protect the wood from penetrating water. This is what it looks like sanded. You can still see the crack in the teak but it is now filled with epoxy while the rest of the surfaces look like...teak.  [smile]




Again, CPES has been applied to the end grain of the top of the chair, it darkens the wood after each application but the excess can be sanded off revealing the natural color of the teak while also filling up the end grain. The end grain has been sealed and you are now free to top coat with whatever product you prefer.








Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #33 on: June 18, 2021, 09:35 AM »
The chaise lounge has 2 small pull-out teak shelves under the frame of the chaise. They originally functioned well however, they've been gradually getting more difficult to operate. I decided to pull the assembly apart and fix the problem.

Once the shelf assembly was removed I noticed several cracks on the shelf guide rail and ultimately one of the guide rails was cracked for about 8". I decided to cut the cracked item out with the Vecturo so that I could get better glue coverage when I reassembled it.

A photo of the disassembled shelf assembly along with the broken rail.

In the 2nd photo, the rail on the LH side attaches to the 8" long piece on the upper RH side.







Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 72
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #34 on: June 18, 2021, 01:23 PM »
Did you consider immersion to seal the ends of the legs? 

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #35 on: June 18, 2021, 02:10 PM »
Did you consider immersion to seal the ends of the legs?

Yes I did, that was originally the method I was going to use because it seemed so simple, however, when I started to think about the logistics of immersing 50 legs into 50 small petri dishes my head started to hurt.  [smile]

The second concern was trying not to waste too much of the CPES. A 2 quart kit costs about $100 so I wanted to maximize the coverage.

And interesting enough, this CPES wasn't even purchased for this project. It was purchased for a window project to stiffen up some soft frames because of an excess of indoor humidity over the winter. I hadn't started the window project yet when I decided this stuff would work well for the teak furniture. 

Offline Dr. P. Venkman

  • Posts: 167
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #36 on: June 18, 2021, 02:31 PM »
That’s looking terrific! Quite a project.

What are you using to sand in between the slats of the chair backs and seats?

Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 72
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #37 on: June 18, 2021, 04:27 PM »

Yes I did, that was originally the method I was going to use because it seemed so simple, however, when I started to think about the logistics of immersing 50 legs into 50 small petri dishes my head started to hurt.  [smile]

The second concern was trying not to waste too much of the CPES. A 2 quart kit costs about $100 so I wanted to maximize the coverage.

Fair enough.  None of the projects I’ve undertaken were amenable to immersion (too big) but I wondered about finding a few jars just wide enough to hold a leg.  From my experience curing of an open container of mixed resin takes days so you could have immersed a couple of chairs for a few hours, topped up the jars, and repeated.
But what you’re doing is great.  I’m just curious as to how well immersion works. And I’ll add my thanks for your posting details and great photos.

Mario



Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #38 on: June 18, 2021, 05:56 PM »
That’s looking terrific! Quite a project.

What are you using to sand in between the slats of the chair backs and seats?

Thanks...for the seat bottoms I'm not going to sand between the slats as the chairs always have Sunbrella cushions on them.

For the chair backs I'm also going to not sand between the slats because they also always have cushions covering them, however, the backs are open from the rear and if the slats from the side look tacky, then I'll sand between them. So, I'll finish a chair first and see what it looks like, that'll dictate the direction I take.

I did pick up a LS 130 profile kit as @mwolczko suggested so I could go that route and I also have a DX 93 that should reach between the slats.  So I do have some options. [smile]



Offline rst

  • Posts: 2684
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #39 on: June 18, 2021, 07:00 PM »
When I refinished my Adirondacks a couple years ago I found the extended delta pads for the RO90 handy.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #40 on: June 19, 2021, 12:51 AM »
When I refinished my Adirondacks a couple years ago I found the extended delta pads for the RO90 handy.

And that’s my 3rd backup position.  [big grin]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #41 on: June 20, 2021, 12:57 AM »
Teak does rot...here's the reason these shelves were no longer freely sliding like they should. Rotting teak on the bottoms and the sides of the shelves.






And rotting teak inside the channels that the shelves and the guide dowels ride in.






So, all of these rotting items were sloughing off rotten/soft teak and the stuff was piling up and re-solidifying in the shelf guide channels, therefore impairing movement.

Once I figured out what the real issue was with the sliding shelves, I decided to coat all of the sliding elements in CPES. As CPES will penetrate into face grain as well as end grain it seemed to be the ideal solution to prevent further deterioration and harden the sliding surfaces . Everything other than the sliding surfaces was masked and 5 applications of CPES was applied. It was left to cure, lightly sanded with 400 grit and then a final coat of CPES was applied and very lightly sanded with 600 grit.

Here's one of the shelf bottoms before and after receiving the CPES treatment.






The shelf assembly is reassembled using screws and new teak plugs/dowels. I decided not to use glue just incase I needed to revisit the solution.  [unsure] 

This really became the charm, as once assembled, the shelves literally slid out on their own...no human intervention.



« Last Edit: June 20, 2021, 10:37 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #42 on: June 20, 2021, 11:10 AM »
On to the wheels of the chaise...after withstanding 15+ years of weather, the wheel assembly was in pretty rough shape. The end grain on the wheels needed a lot of help. It's tough to see in this photo but the bottom of the wheel housing has several small cracks because of the splash back of water from the patio surface.




The entire wheel will be covered with CPES along with the bottom end grain of the wheel housing.




Again, after 7 to 8 coats on the end grain and 4 coats on the face grain, the CPES quits wicking in.




Here's the finished product. The treated end grain of the wheel housing can only be seen because of its different gloss level, the colors are the same.





Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3050
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #43 on: June 20, 2021, 09:11 PM »
I debated teak years ago and went with wrought iron that was painted black.  After 25 years, it had developed some rust, so I had it all picked up and professionally dipped, sand blasted and then powder coated.  Worked great.  Cost was about 1/2 the cost of the furniture new, so not cheap.  I think I had maybe 3500 in the original set, and about 1600 in the recoating.

You're doing a great job on the repairs and refurbishment.  But I don't think I've ever seen teak furniture that stood up to the elements long term.

But since you are retired, what else do you have to do now!

Great photos and process.  Thanks!

Offline Koamolly

  • Posts: 126
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #44 on: June 21, 2021, 03:53 AM »
Looks like you’re doing a very nice job.  I tried Smith's but ultimately went with West Systems and a heat gun to heat the wood before applying epoxy. I hated the fumes/smell of Smith's.  West has some of their own thoughts on penetrating epoxies you might find interesting. 

https://www.epoxyworks.com/index.php/penetrating-epoxy-legend-myth/

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #45 on: June 21, 2021, 09:11 AM »
Hey @neilc just curious how you prevented rust stains on the deck or on the patio?

Yup powder coating isn't cheap...and I also found out that locally, there's an up-charge if you want primer.  [huh]  So all the local powder coaters will give you an estimate MINUS primer.

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3050
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #46 on: June 21, 2021, 09:22 AM »
Furniture was on blue stone.  Plastic tips on the bottom of the furniture.  No rust stains.  The rust was mostly where the wire mesh met the frame for the chairs / table / glider.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #47 on: June 21, 2021, 09:30 AM »
Looks like you’re doing a very nice job.  I tried Smith's but ultimately went with West Systems and a heat gun to heat the wood before applying epoxy. I hated the fumes/smell of Smith's.  West has some of their own thoughts on penetrating epoxies you might find interesting. 

https://www.epoxyworks.com/index.php/penetrating-epoxy-legend-myth/

Thanks for the link to Epoxyworks.  [smile]  In their testing/evaluation, Epoxy A is obviously Smith's CPES, do you know who they're referring to as Epoxy B? They don't say much about it either good or bad.

I like West products a lot, I've used them for slab cracks. When I started this project I first considered West because of my previous experience, I also looked at TotalBoat and MAS. I only considered Smith's after reading a ton of boat rebuilding articles most of which weren't very complimentary towards TotalBoat.

Offline Koamolly

  • Posts: 126
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #48 on: June 21, 2021, 01:04 PM »
No, I don’t know who B might be. 

I used Smith's on redwood end grain I was using for a small entry bridge to my house which is in a rainforest so very wet environment.  I soaked the wood in containers.  It was a hassle soaking the end grain of a 2 X 12 X 12' etc.  Plus it’s so volatile, the fumes lingered in the house.  But it worked fine.  After I had finished my project I ended up doing a deck for a friend in another very wet area.  His neighbor was a distributor for West Systems so I had access to a unlimited supply of West (and as it turns out, quite a bit of really good red wine).  Their container and stirrers are also great and reusable many times.  So used a lot of West for coating all end grain on all the framing.  Also, cutting out rot and laminating new lumber in on house framing, filling countless carpenter bee damage and termite damage.  Since then I’ve been hooked on West regardless of any discount I might get.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #49 on: June 23, 2021, 01:00 AM »
Plus it’s so volatile, the fumes lingered in the house.
I had access to a unlimited supply of West (and as it turns out, quite a bit of really good red wine). 

Now that's weird, I've mixed up 8-10 batches of the Smith's stuff and I've yet to smell the volatiles. And I'm the one with the fine nose as my wife always asks me if something is still good to eat.  [smile]  Maybe it's because I've done everything outside?

I'm also using the Smith's winter formula which contains more volatiles so they flash off quicker during cool temperatures. This stuff can be used in temps from 70º down to 32º.

However, the free red wine could get me to switch vendors.  [big grin] [big grin]
« Last Edit: June 23, 2021, 10:40 AM by Cheese »

Offline Vondawg

  • Posts: 438
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #50 on: June 23, 2021, 08:22 AM »
Great job/work! I applaud you for your patience…Cheese from the looks of it you filled/sanded the chair back end grain and the joint cracks, which I guess receives the moisture as well, (under the leaking cover) do you think the CPES penetrated enough and the joint movement won’t cause it to fail/crack open up?
I see another quart of CPES in your future  [wink] …thanks
There are no mistakes....just new designs.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #51 on: June 23, 2021, 11:24 AM »
Great job/work! I applaud you for your patience…Cheese from the looks of it you filled/sanded the chair back end grain and the joint cracks, which I guess receives the moisture as well, (under the leaking cover) do you think the CPES penetrated enough and the joint movement won’t cause it to fail/crack open up?
I see another quart of CPES in your future  [wink] …thanks

Thanks...Vondawg  [smile] I do think the CPES penetrates enough but what do I know?  [smile]  Any process I employ or any product I select will ultimately be graded only after the passage of time.  [sad]   That's the reason I leaned heavily on the information from the boat building community.

I think this is a good example of it's penetrating capabilities.
Photo 1 is the chaise leg as I originally found it with 2 large cracks about 3/4" long.




I then masked the leg and applied 7-8 coats of CPES. Photo 2 is when I removed the masking tape. The 2 dark spots are where the CPES wicked from the end grain to the outer leg surface. The masking tape was stuck to the leg and I had to remove it with my finger nail and a scalpel.




Photo 3 is after sanding. You can see the veins of cured CPES on the leg surface. And while the crack is visible on the bottom surface of the leg, it will not catch a fingernail and it is fully encapsulated.




Actually the epoxy process isn't that time intensive, it's the sanding that's slow. The cold weather formula has a pot life of 2 hours at 70º. So even though the legs took 7-8 coats, every leg was completely coated within 30 minutes. I just use a loaded foam brush and dabbed on the CPES very thick. By the time I get back to the first chair (3-4 minutes), the CPES has soaked in and I start the process all over again. It goes really fast at first, it just starts to slow down a bit after about 6 coats have soaked in. Then it will take 12-24 hours for it to fully cure.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2021, 11:28 AM by Cheese »

Offline Koamolly

  • Posts: 126
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #52 on: June 23, 2021, 11:28 AM »
Plus it’s so volatile, the fumes lingered in the house.
I had access to a unlimited supply of West (and as it turns out, quite a bit of really good red wine). 

Now that's weird, I've mixed up 8-10 batches of the Smith's stuff and I've yet to smell the volatiles. And I'm the one with the fine nose as my wife always asks me if something is still good to eat.  [smile]  Maybe it's because I've done everything outside?

I'm also using the Smith's winter formula which contains more volatiles so they flash off quicker during cool temperatures. This stuff can be used in temps from 70º down to 32º.

However, the free red wine could get me to switch vendors.  [big grin] [big grin]

Hmmm.  I wonder if Smith's changed their formula at some point?  This was a few years ago.   I also worked outside with all the house windows closed and it lingered.   

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #53 on: June 23, 2021, 11:43 AM »
Hmmm.  I wonder if Smith's changed their formula at some point?  This was a few years ago.   I also worked outside with all the house windows closed and it lingered.

Well now that you bring it up, I am going to give it an extensive sniff test the next batch I mix. Smith's may have changed the formula to try to minimize the noxious odors. I know they've made at least 3 adjustments to the mixture since it's birth. Steve Smith is a physicist and an aerospace engineer so he might always be tweaking the product a little .  Just a technical rendition of "Too many cooks in the kitchen". [smile]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #54 on: June 23, 2021, 12:45 PM »
Here's the sanded chaise. I actually like the natural wood look with some teak oil or some Surfix applied. However, the maintenance schedule for an older guy with this much furniture is overwhelming. So I decided to apply a teak sealer with UV-inhibitors. The sealant is Star Brite Teak Sealer in Natural Teak color. 




Here's the finished product...legs sealed, sliding trays fixed and reattached and the wheel assembly reinstalled with teak dowels. I'll easily trade less than 1 year of the natural look for 4-5 years of the sealed look.  [big grin]  As I mentioned earlier, only time will tell.

Next up are 2 teak entrance mats and the large club chairs and small table.







« Last Edit: June 24, 2021, 08:56 AM by Cheese »

Offline Vondawg

  • Posts: 438
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #55 on: June 24, 2021, 06:37 AM »
Thanks , really looks great, I’m happy to know of the product. I think the UV protectant will be well worth it….like you say time will tell
There are no mistakes....just new designs.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #56 on: June 25, 2021, 10:42 PM »
So, as we slowly muddle along, some of the refinishing is actually becoming easier. Here are a couple of teak door mats that I made maybe about 10 years ago before the price of teak skyrocketed. These things were cheap to execute but expensive to purchase.

I usually refinish these with Surfix every year so they have a maximum finished life span of 6-7 months. The Surfix finish is beautiful and soooo smooth but then you walk on the stuff every day with boots, shoes and dog paws, rain does its damage and the sun just cripples the surface.

Again, I'll try Star Brite Sealer and see what happens.  [smile]  This is really an ongoing experiment...as much as I hate that fact.

So, the 3 photos are; after 6 months of use, sanded with 180 grit and sealed with Star Brite which is really very close to the natural oiled finish.







« Last Edit: June 25, 2021, 11:19 PM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #57 on: June 26, 2021, 12:13 AM »
This is the small teak table that sits between the club chairs. It has been finished on all surfaces with Surfix Outdoors finish. The last application was about 12 months ago where it remained under chair covers on and off for the last 12 months.

And a note to remember...in my experience, Surfix has been a far better preservative than ANY OTHER surface preparation (never tried Osmo) that I've ever used...just list the options and I've used them all.

Notice the dirt, the streaks and every other disgusting element on an otherwise beautiful table. It's all the vertical elements subjected to water splash-back that really look bad. The top of the table after 2 coats of Surfix Outdoor doesn't look too bad but it's starting to lighten up and wear off.




Sanded with 180/220 grit and Star Brite teak sealer applied to the legs and the core structure.




And here's where the beauty resides. The top of the table is finished with 3 coats of Surfix Outdoor oil. The top surface is silky smooth and the color match of the other surfaces to the top of the table is darn close to perfect. But as I've said before, lets give it some time.






« Last Edit: June 26, 2021, 11:14 AM by Cheese »

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 448
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #58 on: June 26, 2021, 09:00 AM »
Reading this thread has prompted deja vu for me...we just moved from a house we owned for 35 years.  About 7 years ago I redid all the decks (3 of them) in Ipe.  When early May came along the first week long stretch of decent weather signaled the annual season of Ipe servitude.  Power wash for 2 days, then treat with brightener, then two or three days applying Ipe Oil.  When finished they looked drop dead gorgeous, by late July still very good but losing some luster, in September you imagined they still looked decent until you moved the dock box holding furniture cushions and saw the glory that was there before a season of UV and weathering.  Then winter, snowmelt and suddenly it was May servitude time again.  We're pushing 70 now and the new house will have a composite deck built by guys a lot younger than me.  Nice job on the teak!

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #59 on: June 26, 2021, 11:05 AM »
We're pushing 70 now and the new house will have a composite deck built by guys a lot younger than me.  Nice job on the teak!

I absolutely hear you...this yearly duty, like your deck, didn't seem so bad many, many years ago.  [smile]  Eighteen years ago I'd do the refinishing using a 1/4 sheet Milwaukee sander, a 1/2 sheet Milwaukee sander and a 5" Dewalt RO sander along with a 3M rubber sanding block (everyone has one of those at the bottom of a drawer)...and I considered myself well equipped for the task.  [huh]

Time does change perspectives.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4187
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #60 on: June 26, 2021, 11:28 AM »
@Cheese, that little table really looks spectacular after the work you did on it.   [smile]
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #61 on: June 26, 2021, 12:13 PM »
@Cheese, that little table really looks spectacular after the work you did on it.   [smile]

Thanks Sparky....I really like the 3 coats of Surfix on the top, I'm going to do that on the large dining table for its refurb. The finish seems deeper and harder than usual and the hand (if that's applicable for wood) is unbelievable. The only thing I did differently other than an additional application of Surfix, was that I "buffed" in the Surfix using the ETS EC 125 in the RO mode rather than using the Rotex in the rotary mode. I think that left more Surfix on the surface and allowed for additional finish build. The look is also more luxurious...photos can't accurately reveal the depth/look.

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1013
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #62 on: June 26, 2021, 06:47 PM »
Following this thread, I’m impressed by your commitment by doing this “light” restoration.
Having persuaded teak on boats, and later outdoor furniture I haven’t touched my deck chair (which is the last of the furniture I have in teak) for maybe 10 years, apart from pressure washing it in the spring. I still have deck details on one of my smaller boats - that’s the only one I’ll persue this year. And I’ll use an oil that you can apply wet on wet until you end up with a highly flexible top coat which resembles flat clear lacquer, but it won’t flake.
I’ve given up on the saturated but still exposed wood fibre surface.

A very nice job Cheese  [smile]
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #63 on: June 26, 2021, 10:56 PM »
Thanks Festita...this thread is really all about those that say Teak...Ipe...Cedar...Redwood...just name your poison, does not need to be taken care of and it will just silver and take care of itself. These are all low maintenance woods but certainly not NO maintenance woods. That fact became quite evident when I disassembled the sliding shelves in the chaise and found rotted teak inside the runners.

So the bottom line is, appreciate and enjoy your wood of choice but realize that it still needs some semblance of maintenance for a reasonable life expectancy.

I fully expect as time goes by, that the surface treatments I've employed will change as the chemistries continue to improve. It's just part of the game.

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 810
  • Michigan
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #64 on: June 27, 2021, 06:46 AM »
I've got several hundred board feet of burmese teak shorts that I'd be willing to sell for far less than the current market price if anyone is interested.  It's been sitting in my basement for a couple decades now and I'd rather have the room than the wood.

Fred
Fred

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #65 on: July 05, 2021, 10:53 AM »
Following this thread, I’m impressed by your commitment by doing this “light” restoration.
Having persuaded teak on boats, and later outdoor furniture I haven’t touched my deck chair (which is the last of the furniture I have in teak) for maybe 10 years, apart from pressure washing it in the spring. I still have deck details on one of my smaller boats - that’s the only one I’ll persue this year. And I’ll use an oil that you can apply wet on wet until you end up with a highly flexible top coat which resembles flat clear lacquer, but it won’t flake.
I’ve given up on the saturated but still exposed wood fibre surface.

A very nice job Cheese  [smile]

That's interesting @FestitaMakool ...because my very FIRST major refinishing project was helping a friend of mine refinish the complete exterior of a 24' wooden Norwegian sailboat about 40 years ago. Everything on the boat was either painted wood or oiled wood except for the mast which had spar varnish applied. An interesting and very pretty little boat, the perfect size for a 1-3 man crew. It was supposed to be quite rare as there were only a dozen or so imported into the US.

I first got involved because the boat had a 2 cylinder diesel engine and the owner was having issues with electricity and wiring. So...I showed up for the mechanical issues but stayed around for the wood finishing issues. [big grin]

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1013
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #66 on: July 11, 2021, 09:40 AM »
Following this thread, I’m impressed by your commitment by doing this “light” restoration.
Having persuaded teak on boats, and later outdoor furniture I haven’t touched my deck chair (which is the last of the furniture I have in teak) for maybe 10 years, apart from pressure washing it in the spring. I still have deck details on one of my smaller boats - that’s the only one I’ll persue this year. And I’ll use an oil that you can apply wet on wet until you end up with a highly flexible top coat which resembles flat clear lacquer, but it won’t flake.
I’ve given up on the saturated but still exposed wood fibre surface.

A very nice job Cheese  [smile]

That's interesting @FestitaMakool ...because my very FIRST major refinishing project was helping a friend of mine refinish the complete exterior of a 24' wooden Norwegian sailboat about 40 years ago. Everything on the boat was either painted wood or oiled wood except for the mast which had spar varnish applied. An interesting and very pretty little boat, the perfect size for a 1-3 man crew. It was supposed to be quite rare as there were only a dozen or so imported into the US.

I first got involved because the boat had a 2 cylinder diesel engine and the owner was having issues with electricity and wiring. So...I showed up for the mechanical issues but stayed around for the wood finishing issues. [big grin]

Cool.. I think I know which boat that is, picturing it.. It had a small cabin and oval windows?

My first and only wooden boat was also a classic sailboat. That was about 34 years ago, me and my late best friend had some of our best memories in this boat.
It was a BB11 - Norwegian designed and built in mahogany. There was quite a few exported to US as well.

Here’s a photo of a few:

“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #67 on: July 13, 2021, 12:12 AM »
Hey Festita, it had a full cabin that slept 2, that meant the 3rd crew member was always odd man out...that was usually me.  [smile]

And now that you mention it, teak was only on the deck surfaces, it was truly a boat constructed of mahogany. For a small sailboat it had a lot of draft and that's the reason we kept catching it on wing dams. But in rough weather the extra draft stabilized the craft and you never felt like you were going to turtle it, even with a lot of sail out.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #68 on: July 13, 2021, 11:10 AM »
There was some earlier discussion about how well the Smith's CPES actually penetrates wood. The second series of photos will answer that question.

The first photos are the before & after of the damaged chair back. Originally, this piece of the chair was close to separating completely and falling off. The chair was tilted backwards so that the crack was vertical. Everything was masked and tape was also placed over the back of the chair crack to contain the CPES. After many, many applications of CPES the epoxy wicked down the crack and eventually completely filled the void, this thing is now solid and just needs to be sealed.










When I started working on the club chairs I noticed a lot of leg damage on both chairs that's not evident unless the chair is turned upside down.  [crying]




Sanded...




After 6 coats of CPES applied with a foam brush dabbed on, not brushed.




This stuff just keeps soaking in, this is 11 coats later.




15 coats later and it's still wicking in.




Finally after 20+ coats the crack is filled.




I need to do a little more work on filling the top surface of the leg, then some sanding and a coat of sealer.  [big grin]

« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 11:38 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #69 on: August 03, 2021, 12:50 AM »
So, I mentioned earlier how rough the club chairs were after years of neglect. It's like not waxing a car, sooner or later time will catch up with you.

Raw...




Sanded & epoxied filled...




Sealed...




The view from 5 feet away...

« Last Edit: August 03, 2021, 01:08 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #70 on: August 03, 2021, 01:06 AM »
And the lounge chair grouping is finally finished. It took a while but I think long-term, it will be well worth the effort.

6:00




8:00...the lighting just kicked on.




11:00

« Last Edit: August 03, 2021, 01:18 AM by Cheese »

Offline Vondawg

  • Posts: 438
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #71 on: August 03, 2021, 08:23 AM »
GREAT job Cheese…it’s nice how the epoxy blends in with the teak, repaired finished outcome even looks like a vain of dark grain
There are no mistakes....just new designs.

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1516
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #72 on: August 03, 2021, 10:09 AM »
Looking good @Cheese

Although for all your Herculean effort, I think you could have just welded up some new frames out of stainless and been done  [big grin]

Ron

Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 72
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #73 on: August 03, 2021, 06:44 PM »
Nicely done, and thanks for all the photos and tips.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #74 on: August 10, 2021, 11:11 AM »
So one of the things I didn't previously mention is that when it was time to refinish the club chairs, they seemed to be less stable than the other furniture. Probably just me being an old guy with diminishing cognitive skills...until of coarse it wasn't.  [smile]

So after moving these things around for several days into various positions to apply the penetrating epoxy, I realized that there was a lot of movement between the structural members of the chairs...more than what I'd consider normal. My only solution was to drill out the teak plugs and try to figure out where the problems were.

I drilled out the first teak dowel using a Forstner bit and within a 1/2" I came to a grinding halt. The teak dowel was covering up a metal fastener.




So, going back to the first item that was rebuilt, when I drilled out the teak dowels on the chaise lounge they were dowels used as structural members to connect the various parts of the lounge, they were not used as plugs to hide metal fasteners.

However, on the club chairs the dowels were used as plugs to hide the hidden metal fasteners. The good news was that when the metal fasteners were exposed, some needed to be tightened by almost a full turn, which really pulled all of the elements back together and firmed everything up. The bad news was that if I just plugged up the holes with dowels, I'd be in the same situation next spring when the chairs became loose again after seasonal expansion & contraction.




So, I decided to fabricate some teak dowels that were a little bit longer than normal so I could easily remove them from the chair and tighten the hidden metal fasteners if needed. I also pressed into the end a double layer of magnets so they would not easily fall out when these chairs were being moved about. 




When I turned down the teak dowel stock to fit the fastener holes, I sized it so it was a nice sliding fit so that the plugs could be removed easily. Thus, rather than sealing the plugs like I've been doing with the furniture which would build a finish, I used Surfix Outdoor Oil to retain the sliding fit. I purchased the teak dowel stock from these folks...2-day service.  [smile]

https://shop.midwestdowel.com/shop/dowels-15/teak-28/




Everything came out fine and I actually like the looks of the protruding plugs better than when they were flush. It has more of a finished look to it.


Offline Dr. P. Venkman

  • Posts: 167
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #75 on: August 10, 2021, 12:11 PM »
Love the dowel solution!

The whole project is looking terrific.  You mentioned 180/220 grit - did you go to 220 on all of the furniture?

I have a single teak bench I want to refinish, and I'm definitely stealing some ideas from your project.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #76 on: August 10, 2021, 12:46 PM »
Love the dowel solution!

The whole project is looking terrific.  You mentioned 180/220 grit - did you go to 220 on all of the furniture?

I have a single teak bench I want to refinish, and I'm definitely stealing some ideas from your project.

Thanks...not really knowing what I was going to need sandpaper wise and having never used this 3M Cubitron before, I ordered a bunch of 120/150/180/220 & 240 grit paper. This Cubitron is a great long lasting paper and for refinishing you could go either 180 or 220. After experimenting a bit, I settled on 180 grit.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5277
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #77 on: August 10, 2021, 01:57 PM »
Agree with Venkman, amazed at the amount of improvement you’ve produced. Almost looks like new furniture.

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/compositions.

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1516
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #78 on: August 10, 2021, 02:30 PM »

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/compositions.

That may mostly be due to the fact that 3M stuff is using the ANSI system for labeling the sandpaper and Festool and other brands you may be familiar with are using the FEPA system for labeling. Lower grits are closer to each other but as you progress up in grits the differences are greater.

Here's a chart with way too much info but it outlines the differences:

https://www.fine-tools.com/G10019.html

Ron

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #79 on: August 10, 2021, 10:09 PM »
Agree with Venkman, amazed at the amount of improvement you’ve produced. Almost looks like new furniture.

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/composition

Thanks Michael... [big grin] ...the results so far have been well worth the effort.

And on another note, the new exterior storm door arrived ahead of schedule so this teak project will be once again put on hold while I prep the opening for a new storm door which in the real world is more important than patio furniture.

Just to vent for a few minutes, I've mounted Pella storm doors on 2 of the 3 door openings. Years & years have gone by and the Pella storm doors are still the best items available. On the 3rd opening, which faces directly west, I decided to mount an Andersen storm door because it was the only thermopane (2 glass panes with a gas fill between them) door available at the time. In the winter the cats & the dogs all love to sit in front of the storm door and watch the wildlife go by. So a thermopane door was a bonus round both for the animals and for the heating bills.

However, the bottom line is, the Pella doors use bronze/oilite bushings to support the weight of the door while the Andersen door with double the glass weight uses PLASTIC bushings to support the weight of the door. So after 2 years of use the Andersen door was sagging on its hinges and refused to close & lock. I'll now be installing a Pella thermopane storm door with louvers between the glass panels to reduce solar gain, I have high hopes.  [big grin]

Now on to the sandpaper, I feel the 3M Cubitron punches above its weight class, meaning it's just more aggressive and it maintains that aggressiveness for a longer time. Is it sharper? Is it harder? Does it have a better binder? I don't know but it really seems to be a lot more aggressive.

Here's a 3M Lab Tech Data Sheet from a number of years ago. You'll notice that USA/ANSI 180, which is how 3M rates their products is the equivalent of P180.

334600-0

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4187
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #80 on: August 11, 2021, 12:04 PM »

I'll now be installing a Pella thermopane storm door with louvers between the glass panels to reduce solar gain, I have high hopes.  [big grin]

 

I installed Pella windows in my last house, @Cheese.  I chose those with the blinds between the glass panes, AND I also got heat mirror coating on the glass.  What a huge difference in keeping the heat out.  One inadvertent side-effect I noted was that all my plants inside the house started dying from a lack of UV light (due to the heat mirror coating), so I had to buy a grow light to make up the difference for the plants. 
« Last Edit: August 11, 2021, 12:06 PM by Sparktrician »
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline TSO_Products

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 384
    • TSO Products LLC
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #81 on: August 14, 2021, 09:03 AM »
@Cheese,
you and Matt of “Plantation Shutter Madness’ fame, have qualified for the Project Completion Olympics. Beautiful work, step after step, you complete projects which are easy to start but an endurance challenge to see through to completion.

My hat’s off to you not only for completing it so beautifully. Your step-by-step pictorial- and narrative documentation pulling in FOG resources to light the way when choices need to be made about methods and materials are an inspiration to "lurkers" to participate.
 
Thank you for providing a head start for anyone else considering a similar project!
Hans

Offline todd_fuller

  • Posts: 28
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #82 on: August 17, 2021, 01:05 PM »
Even Sunbrella which is the standard for the marine industry must have a DWR (Durable water repellent.) If it needs to be done yearly so be it. I stored my boat outside full sun in California. Normally we actually do get rain here, although the storms in MN enthralled me.

Peter,

You may want to check out 303 Fabric Guard. I've been using it on my outdoor umbrella in TX for a few years now. In the past, I tried the Nikwax DWR after Gore sold off their ReviveX DWR line. I think the 303 lasts longer in the sun.

-Todd

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2357
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #83 on: August 23, 2021, 04:38 PM »
Agree with Venkman, amazed at the amount of improvement you’ve produced. Almost looks like new furniture.

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/composition

Thanks Michael... [big grin] ...the results so far have been well worth the effort.

And on another note, the new exterior storm door arrived ahead of schedule so this teak project will be once again put on hold while I prep the opening for a new storm door which in the real world is more important than patio furniture.

Just to vent for a few minutes, I've mounted Pella storm doors on 2 of the 3 door openings. Years & years have gone by and the Pella storm doors are still the best items available. On the 3rd opening, which faces directly west, I decided to mount an Andersen storm door because it was the only thermopane (2 glass panes with a gas fill between them) door available at the time. In the winter the cats & the dogs all love to sit in front of the storm door and watch the wildlife go by. So a thermopane door was a bonus round both for the animals and for the heating bills.

However, the bottom line is, the Pella doors use bronze/oilite bushings to support the weight of the door while the Andersen door with double the glass weight uses PLASTIC bushings to support the weight of the door. So after 2 years of use the Andersen door was sagging on its hinges and refused to close & lock. I'll now be installing a Pella thermopane storm door with louvers between the glass panels to reduce solar gain, I have high hopes.  [big grin]

Now on to the sandpaper, I feel the 3M Cubitron punches above its weight class, meaning it's just more aggressive and it maintains that aggressiveness for a longer time. Is it sharper? Is it harder? Does it have a better binder? I don't know but it really seems to be a lot more aggressive.

Here's a 3M Lab Tech Data Sheet from a number of years ago. You'll notice that USA/ANSI 180, which is how 3M rates their products is the equivalent of P180.

(Attachment Link)
  I use 3M Cubitron II for several uses. I tried the Original Version in a 4 1/2" grinding wheel a few years when it first came out since the video of the wheel 'eating' a solid rod of metal was impressive.  I've got some small 1 x 42" sanding belts for a Jet Combo sander and that one 3M belt in 80 grit really lasts for me.
 The grinding wheels are great too.
 It's more of good stuff from 3M.... [thumbs up] [thumbs up] [thumbs up]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #84 on: August 25, 2021, 12:18 AM »
Wow missed this one... been busy with a storm door.

@Sparktrician That plant UV thing is really weird yet it makes sense, I'm pretty impressed with the capabilities of Pella & Marvin windows.

Thanks Hans @TSO Products , I'm not on another forum nor do I want to be on one....life's too short. My only focus on this forum is to pass on the troubles and travails along with the successes I've had with wood working and metal working and any other craft that's passed across my venue.

@leakyroof I also was introduced to Cubitron II when I chose to use them for .040" cut-off discs. Before then, I'd pretty much sampled all of the variations out there. The 3M Cubitron discs made me sit up and take notice.

FWIW....3M now produces flap discs in Cubitron II



https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/b40064995/

https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/1268693O/cubitron-ii-cutting-grinding-catalog.pdf
« Last Edit: August 28, 2021, 06:04 PM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #85 on: August 28, 2021, 01:30 PM »
So like I've mentioned already, I've recently had to change outdoor project priorities, from teak refinishing to storm door installation. An initial glance of the old door reveals nothing serious only some worn-off paint on the bottom of the sill area.




However, when looked at a bit closer, on the RH upper corner there is a separation of the cedar boards along with a horizontal crack.




While on the LH upper corner there is a separation of cedar again, several small vertical splits along with some putty that is popping from one of the finish nails.




Unfortunately, in the lower RH corner there's a small section of soft cedar that's not noticed until I started to probe the area with the small diameter Starrett scribe. Before I started to probe the area, paint covered all of the damage and only after some serious probing with the scribe did some of the paint lift and then some of the damaged wood flaked off.




All in all not too bad as I installed this about 15 years ago and it faces in a West/South direction so it gets sun from 10:00 AM till sunset and receives the brunt of the weather for 8 months of the year.  Also shame on me, it's never been painted since I first installed it so that's 15 years on SW Duration paint, 1 coat of exterior oil primer & 2 top coats of Duration.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #86 on: August 29, 2021, 10:51 AM »
I'll quickly go over the repairs I made because I learned some things along the way.

There were a lot of screw holes in the trim from the old storm door and with the new door being from a different manufacturer, I'm sure none of the holes were going to line up so I decided to plug them. Some short pieces of poplar dowels and TB III water proof glue fixed those issues.




For the upper areas where the cedar boards separated from each other, my 1st thought was to just caulk, thinking about that for a moment, my 2nd thought then became an epoxy filler, however, noodling for a bit longer I decided on cedar wood filler strips. The more difficult solution to implement but certainly the longest lasting fix. Nothing to peel away and nothing to crack & fall out allowing the weather in.




I produced a different thickness, full depth cedar shim for each side of the door because the gaps were different widths. A couple of trial cedar slices with the bandsaw and some refining with a hard sanding block with 80 grit paper, some trial fitting and they were done.






I mixed up a small batch of Smith's CPES and spread it on both the upper part and the lower part of the gap and I then buttered the cedar shim on both sides with CPES and inserted the shim. As I pushed it into place, some of the CPES oozed out...exactly what I wanted because now I was assured that everything was fully bedded in epoxy. I only wiped off the epoxy that was dripping down the face of the trim. I left any epoxy that was on the surface so that everything became encapsulated.

I let it cure for 24 hours and then hit it with the ETSC 125 with 180 grit Cubitron. It's tough to tell but in the outlined area, everything has been tied together using the CPES. Even the small vertical wood splits are now also filled with CPES. Time for some oil based primer. [smile]




Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8886
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #87 on: September 01, 2021, 10:07 AM »
As part of this storm door rejuvenation, the door bell actuator gave up the ghost several years ago so that became another area to address. Years ago, the door bell button was directly attached to the standard 18 gauge door bell wire, however recently, the latest grouping of LED inspired door bell actuators have instead been using 26/28 gauge silicone jacketed wires permanently attached to the printed circuit board which can become problematic because of the wire's diminutive size. The wire core is only .020" in diameter,




With the new LED door bell buttons no longer being directly wired to the 18 gauge wire, a wire connector now needs to be introduced to connect the 18 gauge wire to the 28 gauge wire. Having enough space for these small connectors behind the door bell button has now become an issue. The hole that the door bell wires exits is usually 1/2" to 3/4" in diameter and roughly 3/4" deep. So finding a quick disconnect connector to fit in that space is problematic. Small wire nuts will not work because the hole/thread diameter is too large. The alternative is to solder the wire connection but that brings along its own baggage.

My solution was to take a Wago 221 5-terminal connector and remove each end connector. I used the 5-terminal connector because it was large enough to hold in the vise. I originally started with the 3-terminal version but it became too small to hold. The interesting thing with these Wago connectors is that there's a common copper buss bar that extends across the entire width of the connector but each connection is self contained with its own closing/latching mechanism so when you cut off an end, it still operates like it should. This way the QD connector is small enough for the hole and you just place both wires into the connector and press the orange lever down.






Quick notes:
I used the vise and a coping saw to section the Wago connector.
Cut into the adjacent connector as close as you can to the connector you want to save, that way you'll only have to cut through the copper buss bar and will miss the stainless actuator spring. If you hit the stainless spring you will rip off all of the teeth on the coping saw blade.




 
« Last Edit: September 01, 2021, 10:13 AM by Cheese »