Author Topic: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture  (Read 11616 times)

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Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4191
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #60 on: June 26, 2021, 11:28 AM »
@Cheese, that little table really looks spectacular after the work you did on it.   [smile]
- Willy -

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  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

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Offline Cheese

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Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #61 on: June 26, 2021, 12:13 PM »
@Cheese, that little table really looks spectacular after the work you did on it.   [smile]

Thanks Sparky....I really like the 3 coats of Surfix on the top, I'm going to do that on the large dining table for its refurb. The finish seems deeper and harder than usual and the hand (if that's applicable for wood) is unbelievable. The only thing I did differently other than an additional application of Surfix, was that I "buffed" in the Surfix using the ETS EC 125 in the RO mode rather than using the Rotex in the rotary mode. I think that left more Surfix on the surface and allowed for additional finish build. The look is also more luxurious...photos can't accurately reveal the depth/look.

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1014
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #62 on: June 26, 2021, 06:47 PM »
Following this thread, I’m impressed by your commitment by doing this “light” restoration.
Having persuaded teak on boats, and later outdoor furniture I haven’t touched my deck chair (which is the last of the furniture I have in teak) for maybe 10 years, apart from pressure washing it in the spring. I still have deck details on one of my smaller boats - that’s the only one I’ll persue this year. And I’ll use an oil that you can apply wet on wet until you end up with a highly flexible top coat which resembles flat clear lacquer, but it won’t flake.
I’ve given up on the saturated but still exposed wood fibre surface.

A very nice job Cheese  [smile]
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #63 on: June 26, 2021, 10:56 PM »
Thanks Festita...this thread is really all about those that say Teak...Ipe...Cedar...Redwood...just name your poison, does not need to be taken care of and it will just silver and take care of itself. These are all low maintenance woods but certainly not NO maintenance woods. That fact became quite evident when I disassembled the sliding shelves in the chaise and found rotted teak inside the runners.

So the bottom line is, appreciate and enjoy your wood of choice but realize that it still needs some semblance of maintenance for a reasonable life expectancy.

I fully expect as time goes by, that the surface treatments I've employed will change as the chemistries continue to improve. It's just part of the game.

Offline bruegf

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  • Michigan
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #64 on: June 27, 2021, 06:46 AM »
I've got several hundred board feet of burmese teak shorts that I'd be willing to sell for far less than the current market price if anyone is interested.  It's been sitting in my basement for a couple decades now and I'd rather have the room than the wood.

Fred
Fred

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #65 on: July 05, 2021, 10:53 AM »
Following this thread, I’m impressed by your commitment by doing this “light” restoration.
Having persuaded teak on boats, and later outdoor furniture I haven’t touched my deck chair (which is the last of the furniture I have in teak) for maybe 10 years, apart from pressure washing it in the spring. I still have deck details on one of my smaller boats - that’s the only one I’ll persue this year. And I’ll use an oil that you can apply wet on wet until you end up with a highly flexible top coat which resembles flat clear lacquer, but it won’t flake.
I’ve given up on the saturated but still exposed wood fibre surface.

A very nice job Cheese  [smile]

That's interesting @FestitaMakool ...because my very FIRST major refinishing project was helping a friend of mine refinish the complete exterior of a 24' wooden Norwegian sailboat about 40 years ago. Everything on the boat was either painted wood or oiled wood except for the mast which had spar varnish applied. An interesting and very pretty little boat, the perfect size for a 1-3 man crew. It was supposed to be quite rare as there were only a dozen or so imported into the US.

I first got involved because the boat had a 2 cylinder diesel engine and the owner was having issues with electricity and wiring. So...I showed up for the mechanical issues but stayed around for the wood finishing issues. [big grin]

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 1014
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #66 on: July 11, 2021, 09:40 AM »
Following this thread, I’m impressed by your commitment by doing this “light” restoration.
Having persuaded teak on boats, and later outdoor furniture I haven’t touched my deck chair (which is the last of the furniture I have in teak) for maybe 10 years, apart from pressure washing it in the spring. I still have deck details on one of my smaller boats - that’s the only one I’ll persue this year. And I’ll use an oil that you can apply wet on wet until you end up with a highly flexible top coat which resembles flat clear lacquer, but it won’t flake.
I’ve given up on the saturated but still exposed wood fibre surface.

A very nice job Cheese  [smile]

That's interesting @FestitaMakool ...because my very FIRST major refinishing project was helping a friend of mine refinish the complete exterior of a 24' wooden Norwegian sailboat about 40 years ago. Everything on the boat was either painted wood or oiled wood except for the mast which had spar varnish applied. An interesting and very pretty little boat, the perfect size for a 1-3 man crew. It was supposed to be quite rare as there were only a dozen or so imported into the US.

I first got involved because the boat had a 2 cylinder diesel engine and the owner was having issues with electricity and wiring. So...I showed up for the mechanical issues but stayed around for the wood finishing issues. [big grin]

Cool.. I think I know which boat that is, picturing it.. It had a small cabin and oval windows?

My first and only wooden boat was also a classic sailboat. That was about 34 years ago, me and my late best friend had some of our best memories in this boat.
It was a BB11 - Norwegian designed and built in mahogany. There was quite a few exported to US as well.

Here’s a photo of a few:

“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Cheese

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Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #67 on: July 13, 2021, 12:12 AM »
Hey Festita, it had a full cabin that slept 2, that meant the 3rd crew member was always odd man out...that was usually me.  [smile]

And now that you mention it, teak was only on the deck surfaces, it was truly a boat constructed of mahogany. For a small sailboat it had a lot of draft and that's the reason we kept catching it on wing dams. But in rough weather the extra draft stabilized the craft and you never felt like you were going to turtle it, even with a lot of sail out.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #68 on: July 13, 2021, 11:10 AM »
There was some earlier discussion about how well the Smith's CPES actually penetrates wood. The second series of photos will answer that question.

The first photos are the before & after of the damaged chair back. Originally, this piece of the chair was close to separating completely and falling off. The chair was tilted backwards so that the crack was vertical. Everything was masked and tape was also placed over the back of the chair crack to contain the CPES. After many, many applications of CPES the epoxy wicked down the crack and eventually completely filled the void, this thing is now solid and just needs to be sealed.










When I started working on the club chairs I noticed a lot of leg damage on both chairs that's not evident unless the chair is turned upside down.  [crying]




Sanded...




After 6 coats of CPES applied with a foam brush dabbed on, not brushed.




This stuff just keeps soaking in, this is 11 coats later.




15 coats later and it's still wicking in.




Finally after 20+ coats the crack is filled.




I need to do a little more work on filling the top surface of the leg, then some sanding and a coat of sealer.  [big grin]

« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 11:38 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #69 on: August 03, 2021, 12:50 AM »
So, I mentioned earlier how rough the club chairs were after years of neglect. It's like not waxing a car, sooner or later time will catch up with you.

Raw...




Sanded & epoxied filled...




Sealed...




The view from 5 feet away...

« Last Edit: August 03, 2021, 01:08 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #70 on: August 03, 2021, 01:06 AM »
And the lounge chair grouping is finally finished. It took a while but I think long-term, it will be well worth the effort.

6:00




8:00...the lighting just kicked on.




11:00

« Last Edit: August 03, 2021, 01:18 AM by Cheese »

Offline Vondawg

  • Posts: 438
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #71 on: August 03, 2021, 08:23 AM »
GREAT job Cheese…it’s nice how the epoxy blends in with the teak, repaired finished outcome even looks like a vain of dark grain
There are no mistakes....just new designs.

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1521
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #72 on: August 03, 2021, 10:09 AM »
Looking good @Cheese

Although for all your Herculean effort, I think you could have just welded up some new frames out of stainless and been done  [big grin]

Ron

Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 72
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #73 on: August 03, 2021, 06:44 PM »
Nicely done, and thanks for all the photos and tips.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #74 on: August 10, 2021, 11:11 AM »
So one of the things I didn't previously mention is that when it was time to refinish the club chairs, they seemed to be less stable than the other furniture. Probably just me being an old guy with diminishing cognitive skills...until of coarse it wasn't.  [smile]

So after moving these things around for several days into various positions to apply the penetrating epoxy, I realized that there was a lot of movement between the structural members of the chairs...more than what I'd consider normal. My only solution was to drill out the teak plugs and try to figure out where the problems were.

I drilled out the first teak dowel using a Forstner bit and within a 1/2" I came to a grinding halt. The teak dowel was covering up a metal fastener.




So, going back to the first item that was rebuilt, when I drilled out the teak dowels on the chaise lounge they were dowels used as structural members to connect the various parts of the lounge, they were not used as plugs to hide metal fasteners.

However, on the club chairs the dowels were used as plugs to hide the hidden metal fasteners. The good news was that when the metal fasteners were exposed, some needed to be tightened by almost a full turn, which really pulled all of the elements back together and firmed everything up. The bad news was that if I just plugged up the holes with dowels, I'd be in the same situation next spring when the chairs became loose again after seasonal expansion & contraction.




So, I decided to fabricate some teak dowels that were a little bit longer than normal so I could easily remove them from the chair and tighten the hidden metal fasteners if needed. I also pressed into the end a double layer of magnets so they would not easily fall out when these chairs were being moved about. 




When I turned down the teak dowel stock to fit the fastener holes, I sized it so it was a nice sliding fit so that the plugs could be removed easily. Thus, rather than sealing the plugs like I've been doing with the furniture which would build a finish, I used Surfix Outdoor Oil to retain the sliding fit. I purchased the teak dowel stock from these folks...2-day service.  [smile]

https://shop.midwestdowel.com/shop/dowels-15/teak-28/




Everything came out fine and I actually like the looks of the protruding plugs better than when they were flush. It has more of a finished look to it.


Offline Dr. P. Venkman

  • Posts: 168
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #75 on: August 10, 2021, 12:11 PM »
Love the dowel solution!

The whole project is looking terrific.  You mentioned 180/220 grit - did you go to 220 on all of the furniture?

I have a single teak bench I want to refinish, and I'm definitely stealing some ideas from your project.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #76 on: August 10, 2021, 12:46 PM »
Love the dowel solution!

The whole project is looking terrific.  You mentioned 180/220 grit - did you go to 220 on all of the furniture?

I have a single teak bench I want to refinish, and I'm definitely stealing some ideas from your project.

Thanks...not really knowing what I was going to need sandpaper wise and having never used this 3M Cubitron before, I ordered a bunch of 120/150/180/220 & 240 grit paper. This Cubitron is a great long lasting paper and for refinishing you could go either 180 or 220. After experimenting a bit, I settled on 180 grit.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5290
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #77 on: August 10, 2021, 01:57 PM »
Agree with Venkman, amazed at the amount of improvement you’ve produced. Almost looks like new furniture.

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/compositions.

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 1521
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #78 on: August 10, 2021, 02:30 PM »

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/compositions.

That may mostly be due to the fact that 3M stuff is using the ANSI system for labeling the sandpaper and Festool and other brands you may be familiar with are using the FEPA system for labeling. Lower grits are closer to each other but as you progress up in grits the differences are greater.

Here's a chart with way too much info but it outlines the differences:

https://www.fine-tools.com/G10019.html

Ron

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #79 on: August 10, 2021, 10:09 PM »
Agree with Venkman, amazed at the amount of improvement you’ve produced. Almost looks like new furniture.

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/composition

Thanks Michael... [big grin] ...the results so far have been well worth the effort.

And on another note, the new exterior storm door arrived ahead of schedule so this teak project will be once again put on hold while I prep the opening for a new storm door which in the real world is more important than patio furniture.

Just to vent for a few minutes, I've mounted Pella storm doors on 2 of the 3 door openings. Years & years have gone by and the Pella storm doors are still the best items available. On the 3rd opening, which faces directly west, I decided to mount an Andersen storm door because it was the only thermopane (2 glass panes with a gas fill between them) door available at the time. In the winter the cats & the dogs all love to sit in front of the storm door and watch the wildlife go by. So a thermopane door was a bonus round both for the animals and for the heating bills.

However, the bottom line is, the Pella doors use bronze/oilite bushings to support the weight of the door while the Andersen door with double the glass weight uses PLASTIC bushings to support the weight of the door. So after 2 years of use the Andersen door was sagging on its hinges and refused to close & lock. I'll now be installing a Pella thermopane storm door with louvers between the glass panels to reduce solar gain, I have high hopes.  [big grin]

Now on to the sandpaper, I feel the 3M Cubitron punches above its weight class, meaning it's just more aggressive and it maintains that aggressiveness for a longer time. Is it sharper? Is it harder? Does it have a better binder? I don't know but it really seems to be a lot more aggressive.

Here's a 3M Lab Tech Data Sheet from a number of years ago. You'll notice that USA/ANSI 180, which is how 3M rates their products is the equivalent of P180.

334600-0

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 4191
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #80 on: August 11, 2021, 12:04 PM »

I'll now be installing a Pella thermopane storm door with louvers between the glass panels to reduce solar gain, I have high hopes.  [big grin]

 

I installed Pella windows in my last house, @Cheese.  I chose those with the blinds between the glass panes, AND I also got heat mirror coating on the glass.  What a huge difference in keeping the heat out.  One inadvertent side-effect I noted was that all my plants inside the house started dying from a lack of UV light (due to the heat mirror coating), so I had to buy a grow light to make up the difference for the plants. 
« Last Edit: August 11, 2021, 12:06 PM by Sparktrician »
- Willy -

  "Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. 
  The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass."

 - Herman Lincoln Wayland (1830-1898)

Offline TSO_Products

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    • TSO Products LLC
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #81 on: August 14, 2021, 09:03 AM »
@Cheese,
you and Matt of “Plantation Shutter Madness’ fame, have qualified for the Project Completion Olympics. Beautiful work, step after step, you complete projects which are easy to start but an endurance challenge to see through to completion.

My hat’s off to you not only for completing it so beautifully. Your step-by-step pictorial- and narrative documentation pulling in FOG resources to light the way when choices need to be made about methods and materials are an inspiration to "lurkers" to participate.
 
Thank you for providing a head start for anyone else considering a similar project!
Hans

Offline todd_fuller

  • Posts: 28
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #82 on: August 17, 2021, 01:05 PM »
Even Sunbrella which is the standard for the marine industry must have a DWR (Durable water repellent.) If it needs to be done yearly so be it. I stored my boat outside full sun in California. Normally we actually do get rain here, although the storms in MN enthralled me.

Peter,

You may want to check out 303 Fabric Guard. I've been using it on my outdoor umbrella in TX for a few years now. In the past, I tried the Nikwax DWR after Gore sold off their ReviveX DWR line. I think the 303 lasts longer in the sun.

-Todd

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2358
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #83 on: August 23, 2021, 04:38 PM »
Agree with Venkman, amazed at the amount of improvement you’ve produced. Almost looks like new furniture.

About the Cubitron, do you feel the abrasive ratings are comparable to other abrasives? Seems to me the Cubitron is cutting coarser than the rating, compared to other brands/composition

Thanks Michael... [big grin] ...the results so far have been well worth the effort.

And on another note, the new exterior storm door arrived ahead of schedule so this teak project will be once again put on hold while I prep the opening for a new storm door which in the real world is more important than patio furniture.

Just to vent for a few minutes, I've mounted Pella storm doors on 2 of the 3 door openings. Years & years have gone by and the Pella storm doors are still the best items available. On the 3rd opening, which faces directly west, I decided to mount an Andersen storm door because it was the only thermopane (2 glass panes with a gas fill between them) door available at the time. In the winter the cats & the dogs all love to sit in front of the storm door and watch the wildlife go by. So a thermopane door was a bonus round both for the animals and for the heating bills.

However, the bottom line is, the Pella doors use bronze/oilite bushings to support the weight of the door while the Andersen door with double the glass weight uses PLASTIC bushings to support the weight of the door. So after 2 years of use the Andersen door was sagging on its hinges and refused to close & lock. I'll now be installing a Pella thermopane storm door with louvers between the glass panels to reduce solar gain, I have high hopes.  [big grin]

Now on to the sandpaper, I feel the 3M Cubitron punches above its weight class, meaning it's just more aggressive and it maintains that aggressiveness for a longer time. Is it sharper? Is it harder? Does it have a better binder? I don't know but it really seems to be a lot more aggressive.

Here's a 3M Lab Tech Data Sheet from a number of years ago. You'll notice that USA/ANSI 180, which is how 3M rates their products is the equivalent of P180.

(Attachment Link)
  I use 3M Cubitron II for several uses. I tried the Original Version in a 4 1/2" grinding wheel a few years when it first came out since the video of the wheel 'eating' a solid rod of metal was impressive.  I've got some small 1 x 42" sanding belts for a Jet Combo sander and that one 3M belt in 80 grit really lasts for me.
 The grinding wheels are great too.
 It's more of good stuff from 3M.... [thumbs up] [thumbs up] [thumbs up]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #84 on: August 25, 2021, 12:18 AM »
Wow missed this one... been busy with a storm door.

@Sparktrician That plant UV thing is really weird yet it makes sense, I'm pretty impressed with the capabilities of Pella & Marvin windows.

Thanks Hans @TSO Products , I'm not on another forum nor do I want to be on one....life's too short. My only focus on this forum is to pass on the troubles and travails along with the successes I've had with wood working and metal working and any other craft that's passed across my venue.

@leakyroof I also was introduced to Cubitron II when I chose to use them for .040" cut-off discs. Before then, I'd pretty much sampled all of the variations out there. The 3M Cubitron discs made me sit up and take notice.

FWIW....3M now produces flap discs in Cubitron II



https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/b40064995/

https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/1268693O/cubitron-ii-cutting-grinding-catalog.pdf
« Last Edit: August 28, 2021, 06:04 PM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #85 on: August 28, 2021, 01:30 PM »
So like I've mentioned already, I've recently had to change outdoor project priorities, from teak refinishing to storm door installation. An initial glance of the old door reveals nothing serious only some worn-off paint on the bottom of the sill area.




However, when looked at a bit closer, on the RH upper corner there is a separation of the cedar boards along with a horizontal crack.




While on the LH upper corner there is a separation of cedar again, several small vertical splits along with some putty that is popping from one of the finish nails.




Unfortunately, in the lower RH corner there's a small section of soft cedar that's not noticed until I started to probe the area with the small diameter Starrett scribe. Before I started to probe the area, paint covered all of the damage and only after some serious probing with the scribe did some of the paint lift and then some of the damaged wood flaked off.




All in all not too bad as I installed this about 15 years ago and it faces in a West/South direction so it gets sun from 10:00 AM till sunset and receives the brunt of the weather for 8 months of the year.  Also shame on me, it's never been painted since I first installed it so that's 15 years on SW Duration paint, 1 coat of exterior oil primer & 2 top coats of Duration.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #86 on: August 29, 2021, 10:51 AM »
I'll quickly go over the repairs I made because I learned some things along the way.

There were a lot of screw holes in the trim from the old storm door and with the new door being from a different manufacturer, I'm sure none of the holes were going to line up so I decided to plug them. Some short pieces of poplar dowels and TB III water proof glue fixed those issues.




For the upper areas where the cedar boards separated from each other, my 1st thought was to just caulk, thinking about that for a moment, my 2nd thought then became an epoxy filler, however, noodling for a bit longer I decided on cedar wood filler strips. The more difficult solution to implement but certainly the longest lasting fix. Nothing to peel away and nothing to crack & fall out allowing the weather in.




I produced a different thickness, full depth cedar shim for each side of the door because the gaps were different widths. A couple of trial cedar slices with the bandsaw and some refining with a hard sanding block with 80 grit paper, some trial fitting and they were done.






I mixed up a small batch of Smith's CPES and spread it on both the upper part and the lower part of the gap and I then buttered the cedar shim on both sides with CPES and inserted the shim. As I pushed it into place, some of the CPES oozed out...exactly what I wanted because now I was assured that everything was fully bedded in epoxy. I only wiped off the epoxy that was dripping down the face of the trim. I left any epoxy that was on the surface so that everything became encapsulated.

I let it cure for 24 hours and then hit it with the ETSC 125 with 180 grit Cubitron. It's tough to tell but in the outlined area, everything has been tied together using the CPES. Even the small vertical wood splits are now also filled with CPES. Time for some oil based primer. [smile]




Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #87 on: September 01, 2021, 10:07 AM »
As part of this storm door rejuvenation, the door bell actuator gave up the ghost several years ago so that became another area to address. Years ago, the door bell button was directly attached to the standard 18 gauge door bell wire, however recently, the latest grouping of LED inspired door bell actuators have instead been using 26/28 gauge silicone jacketed wires permanently attached to the printed circuit board which can become problematic because of the wire's diminutive size. The wire core is only .020" in diameter,




With the new LED door bell buttons no longer being directly wired to the 18 gauge wire, a wire connector now needs to be introduced to connect the 18 gauge wire to the 28 gauge wire. Having enough space for these small connectors behind the door bell button has now become an issue. The hole that the door bell wires exits is usually 1/2" to 3/4" in diameter and roughly 3/4" deep. So finding a quick disconnect connector to fit in that space is problematic. Small wire nuts will not work because the hole/thread diameter is too large. The alternative is to solder the wire connection but that brings along its own baggage.

My solution was to take a Wago 221 5-terminal connector and remove each end connector. I used the 5-terminal connector because it was large enough to hold in the vise. I originally started with the 3-terminal version but it became too small to hold. The interesting thing with these Wago connectors is that there's a common copper buss bar that extends across the entire width of the connector but each connection is self contained with its own closing/latching mechanism so when you cut off an end, it still operates like it should. This way the QD connector is small enough for the hole and you just place both wires into the connector and press the orange lever down.






Quick notes:
I used the vise and a coping saw to section the Wago connector.
Cut into the adjacent connector as close as you can to the connector you want to save, that way you'll only have to cut through the copper buss bar and will miss the stainless actuator spring. If you hit the stainless spring you will rip off all of the teeth on the coping saw blade.




 
« Last Edit: September 01, 2021, 10:13 AM by Cheese »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8906
Re: Refinishing & Rebuilding Teak Outdoor Furniture
« Reply #88 on: September 24, 2021, 04:38 PM »