Author Topic: Considering buying an Origin  (Read 912 times)

Oldwood, GoingMyWay, JD2720, Distinctive Interiors and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Online Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 570
Considering buying an Origin
« on: Yesterday at 06:49 PM »
As the title says, I have been thinking about getting an Origin for quite some time. My main concern is the learning curve. I don't know anyone who has one, or ever used one. Any advice or information about where to look would be greatly appreciated.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75

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Offline Shavings

  • Posts: 21
Re: Considering buying an Origin
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 08:56 PM »
Sorry, I need to ask, "What is an Origin?" [blink]

Offline Chainring

  • Posts: 77
Re: Considering buying an Origin
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 09:06 PM »
Origin Shaper. From the little I know, it's essentially a human guided CNC.

Offline rmhinden

  • Posts: 473
Re: Considering buying an Origin
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 09:09 PM »
As the title says, I have been thinking about getting an Origin for quite some time. My main concern is the learning curve. I don't know anyone who has one, or ever used one. Any advice or information about where to look would be greatly appreciated.

I got a Shaper Origin (and workstation) recently, I had been thinking about it for while, had some available money, and got a lot of encouragement from another FOG member.   

There is a lot of information on https://www.shapertools.com/en-us/ under the support pages and lots of project designs on ShaperHub.   Also, a lot of YouTube videos, active Facebook group, and Instagram.   

So far I have done some test projects based on projects I found on the ShaperHub pages, and made a box joint box using the built in capability.   My next step is to learn which design software program to use make my own designs.    Like all things, there is a learn curve.   

I like it and am glad I purchased it.  The Workstation is great and really compliments the Shaper Origin.   It is an interesting combination of a router (I think it's the OF1010 motor and collet) and computer control.    It not a CNC, it requires the person using it set it up and move it around.   Fairly hands on.   For what I make, that is fine, I don't do production.    If I need to make a lot of things, I will use it to make very accurate templates.   It also opens up new capabilities.
Bob



Online JD2720

  • Posts: 1218
Re: Considering buying an Origin
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 10:21 PM »
Sorry, I need to ask, "What is an Origin?" [blink]

Shaper Origin

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 2065
Re: Considering buying an Origin
« Reply #5 on: Today at 05:06 AM »
I bought one at the end of the very first offering. I use it less that I would have thought however that is because of my own lack of focus. Overall I love it.

Learning curve breaks down into (1) how best to apply the tool and (2) generating the designs to cut. The former was greatly enhanced when they released the WorkStation, I would not buy the SO now without one. Total game changer. Afterwards it's wrapping your head around using the tool to grid the workpiece and place the design to cut. With a little use controlling the tool becomes routine, the interface to set cut depth, select cut type, offset, etc is all really intuitive and simple to use.

RE design, a lot can be done using on-tool options to create simple shapes. For more complex stuff I've defaulted to Fusion 360 which does have a learning curve. For hobby use its free, and there are lots if resources but plan on spending some time. I consider the investment to be worthwhile since I now use F360 for other shop projects and 3d printing.

I've done inlays for solid wood tables, curved bases for lamps, lots of slots and pockets in various projects and templates for hand routing parts for complex assemblies, all of which were very precise and would have been difficult and time consuming to complete without it. Overall very pleased and glad I have one.

For one inlay we sketched a complex freehand outline on the wood, took a photo, imported into photoshop (had millennial assistance) traced, exported svg, dropped it on the stock and cut both the pocket and inlay flawlessly. Don't think I could have  managed that any other way.

Hope this helps.

RMW

As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Online Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 570
Re: Considering buying an Origin
« Reply #6 on: Today at 06:39 AM »
RMW,
That is very informative, just what I was looking for. I was wondering just how useful it can be with the "on board" software. I know nothing about Fusion 360, but I am fairly adept with Photoshop.

The tips about the hub and other forums are appreciated too, Thanks to all.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75