Author Topic: C 12 cordless drill  (Read 5627 times)

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Offline Rick

  • Posts: 2
C 12 cordless drill
« on: February 12, 2007, 11:01 AM »
I currently have a DeWalt 18 volt cordless-but the batteries lately really stink (xw!'h&5) literally making this cordless useless. I am not new to festool- owning the PS 300 jig/RO 150 sander/TS 55EQ saw/OF 1400 EQ router. What I would like to know if festools cordless is really worth double the money? I know that sounds like a silly question but there are times when you draw a line in the sand and say no-I'm not spending that much for a screw driver/drill. Can't wait for their sliding miter to come out.

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Offline glennwarner

  • Posts: 5
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2007, 11:17 AM »
The drill was one of my first festools and I wondered about its value.  Last time I thought about the price was before I bought it.  The price never crossed my mind again.  That's true for all my festools, except the jig saw where I have had some doubts. 

Offline Jerry Work

  • Posts: 307
    • The Dovetail Joint
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2007, 11:21 AM »
Hi Rick,

My short answer is "yes" by all means it is "worth double the money".  Since the first Festool drill came into my studio it chased all the other colors and voltages of drills out.  And, since the C12 came into the studio it is the one I reach for first.  Small, powerful, easy to handle, great slow speed control, interchangable chucks and the batteries seem to last a loooooong time.  Doesn't get any better than that from my POV.

Jerry

I currently have a DeWalt 18 volt cordless-but the batteries lately really stink (xw!'h&5) literally making this cordless useless. I am not new to festool- owning the PS 300 jig/RO 150 sander/TS 55EQ saw/OF 1400 EQ router. What I would like to know if festools cordless is really worth double the money? I know that sounds like a silly question but there are times when you draw a line in the sand and say no-I'm not spending that much for a screw driver/drill. Can't wait for their sliding miter to come out.
The Dovetail Joint
Fine furniture designed and hand crafted by Jerry Work
in the 1907 former Masonic Temple building
in historic Kerby, OR. 
26 mi SW of Grants Pass on US 199, The Redwood Highway
Visitors always welcome!
http://jerrywork.com
glwork@mac.com

Offline Dan Lyke

  • Posts: 321
    • Flutterby.net
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2007, 12:05 PM »
I don't have experience with other battery powered drills, my impressions were so overwhelmingly negative that I couldn't see going through the hassles of batteries for a glorified screwdriver. But when we were doing our first Festool purchase we looked at the 3 tool package versus getting, say, the sander and a second dust collector and buying the jigsaw separately, and said "what the heck".

My corded drill now gathers dust in the shed. Not only that, but a whole bunch of projects that were waiting for me to get out the extension cord and the ladder to finish have now been done because the extension cord is moot.

The adjustment to the C12 has not been trivial: Because of the brushless motor, the speed controller on the C12 is speed, not current to the motor, so I can't pull the trigger in part way and expect the drill to bog down as the screw head bites into the wood; I have to adjust the clutch for that.

But even for using a sanding drum I've been amazingly happy with the C12.

Is it worth more? My corded drill probably cost me $70-80, and the C12 has more torque. Even with constant use (sanding) I haven't run a battery down in less time than the spare battery charges on the quick charge. I'm just a hobbiest, but this is a battery powered that has completely replaced a corded tool, something I didn't expect to happen for another decade or so, especially since I'm the sort of person who generally loathes battery powered devices.
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 401
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2007, 01:30 PM »
All the attachments have sold me over the last year since I bought my TDK.  I am currently finishing the half of my basement that isn't my shop.  There are a bunch of things I've used the right-angle and offset attachments for.  I don't know how I managed without them.  I'm sure I would've found a way to do the things I had to do, but I didn't really have to think about it.  The project is taking me enough time as it is, so time saved by the attachments is good.
Jay St. Peter

Offline Per Swenson

  • Posts: 871
  • So far deep in rural nj, there are no Neighbors
    • Swenson&Swenson
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2007, 02:16 PM »
Hey all,

I don't have a Festool drill.

Whaaaa? .................            OK , Yet.

I do have 7, well 12 other cordless drills, if you count the ones I have

given to the children as they near the end.

The drills not the kids.

So the Question is..........

How did you fellas wrap your mind around using your other finger

instead of your trigger finger on the C-12?

Because when I picked one up at Bob's, my lil

reptilian brain said ,  oh that will never do.

Deep down though I still kinda covet one.

Go ahead convert me.

Per
« Last Edit: February 12, 2007, 02:30 PM by Per Swenson »
Party like its 1929. It's the American way.


There outta be a law banning sesquipedalianism on

internet forums.

www.swensonz.com

Offline Dan Lyke

  • Posts: 321
    • Flutterby.net
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2007, 02:22 PM »
How did you fellas wrap your mind around using your other finger instead of your trigger finger on the C-12?

Huh. I had to go pick up my drill and look at it to realize what you were talking about. I completely haven't been conscious of that difference, but I guess that's why I initially thought the speed control on the drill was too twitchy (I've since trained my fingers to do the right thing).

Wild. Major difference and somehow I wasn't even aware of it.
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline Dan Lyke

  • Posts: 321
    • Flutterby.net
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2007, 02:48 PM »
Okay, one down side: You'll be looking at those $7.99 for 20 bits sets in the "bargain" section of your local Ace hardware (or, worse, "tool" section of the behemoth cut rate large department store) even though you know a sub fifty-cent bit can't possibly be worth a darn because maybe, just maybe, that hex shank would give you imperial size bits in your Centrotec bit holder.

No matter how many years you may have been completely blissed out by a really nice keyless chuck, all of a sudden the fact that you have to switch back to one when using small bits or drilling any hole that needs to be be measured in fractions of an inch starts to feel really really constraining.

Now I'm on the prowl for metric dowels and rulers...
« Last Edit: February 12, 2007, 02:59 PM by Dan Lyke »
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2007, 04:11 PM »
I have yet to be persuaded by any newer drill, whether battery powered, or corded to give up my Milwaukee Magnum 1/4 inch drill, due to its combination of speed (0 - 2500 RPM), power/torque (>5 A), durability (I have pumped out foundations with it!), and most important - its precision geared "zero" chuck that will accurately hold the tiniest bits and those up to and slightly above 1/4 inch without slipping or marring the drill bit shank.  Most of the "no chuck wrench" drill chucks I have experienced slip at some point, and I think I read at least one complaint that the C12 chuck does slip.  I would like to learn that I am wrong in this, so teach me whose keyless chuck products actually work without slipping on a round drill bit shank, e.g. when breaking through steel or cast iron.

Cheap drill bits - sure, why not for some projects?  I recently bought some from Northern Hydraulic (MN) made in PRC.  $20 for and indexed set of twist drills from 1/64th to 1/2 inch, TiN coated, and with extra drill bits in the small sizes that are commonly used and easily broken.  The first one I tried, 9/64ths had slight observable runout, but it quickly drilled the 4 holes I needed through the edges of the cast iron top of my table saw, which were intentionally sized for a loose slip fit of 1/4" bolts.  On the other hand, I also own a high quality set of twist drills, that I limit to use on a drill press when I need more precision.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Dan Clark

  • Posts: 540
    • talkFestool
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2007, 04:43 PM »
I have the C12 with "Chuckies" (Chuck Kit).   Great drill.    It is easily the most used Festool that I own.    There's nothing like drilling 60-70 3" long 5/16" lag screws into 3" of wood and Microllam sistered joists in 10 minutes to make you appreciate the drill.  (I had to get the joists screwed together before the adhesive skimmed over.)

One of the things that most people talk about but never see is the drill or battery pack overheating.   I did it several times (my own fault).   With a normal drill (Dewalt 18V comes to mind), when they overheat they fry themselves.   Put the battery into the charger and you can cause it to "bubble over" and turn to slag.   

With C12, if you overheat it, the drill just says to itself, "Hey, I'm overheating.  I'll just stop now and inform the idiot operator that he's OVERHEATING ME!"   So the drill sounds a "Beep" and stops.   It won't go any further until it cools down.  Now at that point, you swear and yank the very hot battery off of the drill and pop it into the charger.    Does the charger fry the battery?   Nope.  It senses that the battery is too hot and shows a red "Overheated" light (either flashing or steady- I can't remember which).  Then when it's safe to charge the battery, the charger turns on and stuffs in more juice.

IMO, the chuck kit alone is worth the price.   One of my favorite tricks is to have a drill bit in one chuck (usually standard FastFix) and a screw bit in the CentroTec.   With a little practice you can change chucks in about 4 seconds.   For situations where you need to predrill and then screw in the screws, over and over, it's great.   

Attached are three pics showing the screws compared to standard deck screws, the box of screws, and the sistered joists.  There were a lot of joist sisters.  I used 1100 of these 3" 5/16" lag screws.   

And yes my C12 is still truckin' along, thank you.

Dan.

p.s. First I tried Phillips head screws.  Virtually all cammed out quickly.   Then Square drive screws.   About 30% cammed out.  Then Star Drive.  About 5% cammed out.   Working over your head in an uncomfortable position makes you appreciate Star Drive (Torx) screws.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2007, 04:46 PM by Dan Clark »

Offline art stratemeyer

  • Posts: 29
    • Fine Woodworkers
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2007, 07:55 AM »
Here in my shop we use 3 battery drills

Panasonic 14v .. this beast just keeps going and going and going

Festool - generally setup with the offset driver head for cabinet work. For normal "shop usage" I would not have bought it. However the various chucks have gotten us out of more than one bind during an install so it has paid for itself.

Dewalt - the small 7.2v angled hand held.  We have 3 of these.  They are the favorites for general use in the shop.  Darn good clutch, light weight and the damned things have a surprising amount of torque for their size
Art Stratemeyer

Fine Woodworkers
www.finewoodworkers.com

Offline Dave Rudy

  • Posts: 771
  • Coloroda Front Range, in the lee of Pikes Peak
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2007, 09:29 AM »
Jack,

Really beautiful work on your website. And that piece of bubinga is almost unbelievable!

I appreciate your thoughtful approach to every aspect of the craft.  Keep up the good work!

Dave

Offline Peter Teubel

  • Posts: 148
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2007, 11:08 PM »
Dave Ronyak,

The C12 chuck does not slip...when tightened properly. Most (if not all) other keyless chucks require you to hold one part of the chuck while tightening the other part of the chuck. Just holding the chuck while driving the drill motor will NOT tighten the chuck enough. With the C12, you just grab the chuck and tighten while holding the drill body. The chuck will NOT spin...some sort of internal locking mechanism will hold it while you can REALLY tighten the chuck with the other hand.

- Pete

Offline Dan Uhlir

  • Posts: 138
    • www.danuhlir.com
Re: C 12 cordless drill
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2007, 05:57 PM »
tdk drill


    Was quickly per-using the takes on the c12 personally I went with the tdk I couldn't get my head brain or hand around the c12 idea, that's for you nMr. Swenson you do have a choice here. All that being said, yesterday when I went into the ski shop one of the other techs, could not get a screw out of a ski he tried hammering screaming, yelling and shouting no luck I let him carry on for fifteen minutes, and finally said let me try turned up the tdk12 and without hesitation the screw was effortlessly removed from the ski. That's why I like the tdk,I encounter deeply set screws which could literally take an hour to to remove not anymore.Peace dan