Author Topic: Tools and their recommended speeds  (Read 5929 times)

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Offline Chris Meggersee

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Tools and their recommended speeds
« on: June 23, 2010, 03:26 PM »
After struggling with my Trion for a while on a project trying to figure out what speed and pendulum action to use I finally decided to consult The Manual  [eek] It was scary at first but I soon found my answer and had a great cut going even sooner after. I thought that i needed that info in the manual but didn't want to have to go into the house and dig around for the manual. So I made a table, printed it and stuck it on the inside of systainer.

Since I rarely contribute positively to this forum I thought now is my chance. So to anyone who wants to do the same here is a consolidation of all my Festools recommended speeds.

TS55


Trion


RO125


OF1010


Sorry about the router being in metric only. If anyone wants it in imperial just let me know. 
PS300EQ Jigsaw - OF1010EBQ Router - DF500 Domino - RO125FEQ Sander - C12CE Drill - TS55EBQ Saw - CT22E Dust extractor - DTS400 Sander

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Offline Festool USA

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2010, 03:38 PM »
Definitely easier to make scroll cuts with the Trion in wood using a slower speed setting.  It gives you more control.

Offline Chris Meggersee

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2010, 05:05 PM »
As far as I am aware these are guidlines for cutting straight or basic shapes or at least that is what would make sense. Obviously it depends on what you are doing but these are just guidlines, not the rule book ;)
PS300EQ Jigsaw - OF1010EBQ Router - DF500 Domino - RO125FEQ Sander - C12CE Drill - TS55EBQ Saw - CT22E Dust extractor - DTS400 Sander

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Offline David

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2010, 06:42 PM »
Good work.

I failed to set my OF 1400 router to the highest setting when doing some dovetails recently, and it was a disaster--little pieces flying everywhere. As soon as I realized the error and cranked it up to "6" on speed dial, it was smooth as warm butter.
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Offline Tom Bellemare

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2010, 07:02 PM »
Full speed can work for most hardwoods with a handheld router and a small enough diameter bit but not for all. Some woods are prone to burning if the bit is allowed to dwell just a little. I really like what Chris said...

Quote
these are just guidlines, not the rule book

It's all about feed and speed. You can set the tool to a certain "recommended" speed but depending on the work piece material, your own feed speed, and the cutter, you can be dead on or quite a bit off.

I think for handheld applications, it's best to test the material and cutter combination (the same material and same set up) to determine the ideal tool speed. (This goes for all cutting tools.) I think the tool should turn just fast enough to not chatter under similar conditions.

The cut will be nicer - smooth and not burnt and the cutter will last longer. It lasts longer and you don't burn the material because you are actually cutting instead of dwelling. If you're dwelling, you are creating heat from friction. If you're cutting, you are dissipating heat through what you are taking off - it absorbs heat from the cutting surface.

People who are used to using their tools generally have a feel for how fast to turn them. People who aren't used to using their tools are lucky if they get it right the first try.


Tom

Online Alex

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2010, 07:05 PM »
I'm just for full speed all the time. A speed dial is just a waste of space and material to me. I find it largely a sales gimmick. [not worthy]

Offline jmbfestool

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2010, 08:03 PM »
I'm just for full speed all the time. A speed dial is just a waste of space and material to me. I find it largely a sales gimmick. [not worthy]

Same with me. TS55 FULL SPEED AHEAD!!!!!!!!!! Carvex full revs rip right through wood!!!!! Router full speed make some DUST BABY!!!
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Offline Tom Bellemare

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2010, 01:24 AM »
Me too, in cheap Pine!

Goooaaalll...


Tom


'Sorry, I got carried away with some silly group that calls itself a Soccer team. Why did they advance when they don't even know the terminology???

Online Alex

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2010, 06:06 AM »
Why did they advance when they don't even know the terminology???

Because secretly, when no other Americans can hear them, they call it Football. Because, you know, they understand you got to use your foot to kick the ball around instead of your hands.  ;D

Offline Rob-GB

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2010, 01:47 PM »
Why did they advance when they don't even know the terminology???

Because secretly, when no other Americans can hear them, they call it Football. Because, you know, they understand you got to use your foot to kick the ball around instead of your hands.  ;D

When you use your hands it is called 'Rugby' [poke]  [dead horse]

Offline Rob-GB

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2010, 01:59 PM »
With around 5 to 6 years of research and development for each tool (according to a discussion with my local rep) there really is a valid reason why Festool incorporated variable speed controls, just try routing perspex at full speed and fast feed rate [eek] . I use them and appreciate their necessity. [wink]

Offline tdfiver

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2010, 06:33 PM »
I think the  easy answer is....if the material to be cut, sanded, drilled or routed will melt or burn at a high speed then turn it down...whether it's sanding, routing cutting or drilling.

Offline jvsteenb

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2010, 04:29 AM »
Some woods are more prone to burning or scorching as well. For instance: I tend to saw and route cherry on a slightly lower speed setting, but with a little more feed. Serves me well.
I like variable speed in tools. Every cutting action has it's ideal speed - there are lots of factors involved. In some materials - like most solid woods - the "sweet spot" is rather broad, so "allways cutting at max" won't have too much adverse effects.
Metals, polymers and other man-made materials are mostly less forgiving, so you'll have to give it some thought if you want a "perfect cut" instead of a "decent cut".


Regards,

Job
TS55, OF1010, RO150, RTS400, PS300, T15+3, CTL22E, CMS-TS55+Basis5A (OF1010), MFT/3, MFS400/700, FS800-1080-1400-1900, Centrotec-SYS 09, DF 500 full set, some accessories :)

Offline Rob-GB

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2010, 11:50 AM »
Some woods are more prone to burning or scorching as well. For instance: I tend to saw and route cherry on a slightly lower speed setting, but with a little more feed. Serves me well.
I like variable speed in tools. Every cutting action has it's ideal speed - there are lots of factors involved. In some materials - like most solid woods - the "sweet spot" is rather broad, so "allways cutting at max" won't have too much adverse effects.
Metals, polymers and other man-made materials are mostly less forgiving, so you'll have to give it some thought if you want a "perfect cut" instead of a "decent cut".


Regards,

Job

Cherry is a great example, Job. When turning ( I know Festool don't make a lathe yet! [huh]) one thing you need to be careful of is the heat generated while sanding.
Cherry will surface check if too warm, the are like tiny fractures in the wood and spoil the finished item. Too much heat build up while routing or sanding non turned Cherry can cause the same thing. I ruined a fruit bowl due to this fact just before someone said " did you know...." [doh]
Rob.

Offline Chris Meggersee

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2010, 12:03 PM »
Too much heat build up while routing or sanding non turned Cherry can cause the same thing. I ruined a fruit bowl due to this fact just before someone said " did you know...." [doh]
Rob.

Yeah but that's how you learn. I mean if you look at my PS3 cabinet thing I built here. I didn't even think about what Wayne had said, nor did my dad tell me but now that I know I have learnt :)

If you are dealing with just wood I don't think you would need all 6 speeds that Festool supply. I would guess you would need about 3 or 4 but Festool being Festool they allow you to many materials and in that arena all the speeds are necessary. I shudder at remembering what it was like trying to cut perspex with a cheap Ryobi one speed saw.
PS300EQ Jigsaw - OF1010EBQ Router - DF500 Domino - RO125FEQ Sander - C12CE Drill - TS55EBQ Saw - CT22E Dust extractor - DTS400 Sander

Wish List: Anything not listed above in the catalogue.

Offline Rob-GB

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2010, 12:40 PM »
Chris, I understand what you are saying and somewhat agree "If all you are using is timber, then the variety offered in speed control is not needed".
However, we have to work with non timber products more and more, as technology and new products progress it gets harder to avoid them. Festool have to aim at the bigger market where craftsmen work with a variety of materials, it would be commercial suicide otherwise. I am happy that the tools I have can handle most everything I encounter, I earn more that way ;D
Rob.

Offline Chris Meggersee

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2010, 03:54 PM »
I agree with you. It's great having speed control, I find it does come in handy. Although lets be honest, with the price you pay for Festools the least they can do is put a speed knob on it ;)
PS300EQ Jigsaw - OF1010EBQ Router - DF500 Domino - RO125FEQ Sander - C12CE Drill - TS55EBQ Saw - CT22E Dust extractor - DTS400 Sander

Wish List: Anything not listed above in the catalogue.

Offline Dovetail65

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2010, 04:04 PM »
For router bits the size of the cutter matters as much and even more than the material being routed.

Don't go swinging a 3" cutter on a router at high speed. The tip speed on the larger router bits is very, very high. With router bits as the bit gets larger the tip speed gets faster, even if the router is kept on the same speed. This is the reason the router needs to be slowed down as the bits get larger.

On routers speed control is absolutely not a gimmick.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2010, 04:07 PM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline waynelang2001

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Re: Tools and their recommended speeds
« Reply #18 on: June 25, 2010, 04:38 PM »
Ive been in the cabinet making business for nearly 10 years now and only in the last year have i figured that speed control does come in handy. On my rosewood pc desk jobhttp://festoolownersgroup.com/member-projects/pc-desk-and-printer-units-made-from-rosewood-%28-bubinga-%29/ i did some flute work with the 1010 on speed 6, about half way through i must have accidently turn down the speed and when i started cutting i noticed that there was no burning of the rose wood when i ended the flute. So yes speed control for me is a must on a router. And im sure in other materials besides wood the speed control on most cutting tools will be needed.
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