Author Topic: Router 1400  (Read 865 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pixie

  • Posts: 2
Router 1400
« on: September 11, 2021, 01:36 PM »
I just received the 1400 router for a birthday present and I am looking forward to using it. I have been searching but where can I find information on the bits to buy for what I want to use the router for? To start I’d lie to carve out channels in hardwood to make a river table with epoxy. Looking forward to some good advice! Thanks

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Paul_HKI

  • Posts: 84
Re: Router 1400
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2021, 06:54 PM »

Hi Pixie.  Not looking to rain on your.... eh... river, but....

River tables are made using a space between two live edge boards, typically.  I don't think I've ever seen one made using channels which were routed into a hardwood top. 


Now that may be because I don't look at them any more than I have to because I think they're already a dated look, a fad, something most people will look at the same way we look at 1970's melamine kitchens and linoleum floor tiles. 


Best advice?  Pick up a copy of Complete Routing by Alan Holtham to get a good understanding of what else you can do with that fantastic tool you now have at your disposal.  Then buy the individual bits you need to do the things you decide to do.  A router is an incredibly versatile tool once you have a good understanding of how it works and what you can do with it.  Read that book and it will really open up possibilities for you.


Best of luck and before I forget, Happy Birthday and welcome to FOG.
TSC 55, TS 55 REBQ, DF 500, DF 700, OF2020, OF900E, CXS, TXS, T18+3, PDC 18/4, C18, RO 150, RAS 115.04e, RTS 400, ETS 125, ETS 150/5 EQ, HL 850, CTL 26 E, CTL MIDI I, FESTO SR151 E-AS, CTL-Sys, MFT/3, 2 x Sys-Roll's, DUO SYSLITE, BR 10 etc.

Offline woodferret

  • Posts: 105
Re: Router 1400
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2021, 07:09 PM »
Gratz on the birthday present.  For river tables, the primary use of the router will be as a slab flattening jig.  Ideally, a bottom clearing bit in 8mm shank, but 1/4 will do if you're in NA.  Size will just be smaller and clearing passes more just to avoid shank deflection.

The following YouTube video might be useful to understand what is required.  Typically though as Paul mentioned, river tables are constructed differently than the video which is uses the router to fake the live edge.  Given that most RTs are pretty opaque, this might be an option if you don't care to see depth.



Welcome and enjoy.

Edit: appendix - for plunging and hogging out the river, a spiral upcut might be useful to clear the copious amounts of chips.  You can get away with a cheaper straight plunge bit, the difference being the start will be slower but once the channel is made, not much.  In case you're new to routers, avoid straight bits that aren't plunge rated as you can only start from the outside and cost saving isn't much.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2021, 07:19 PM by woodferret »

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 689
Re: Router 1400
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2021, 09:26 AM »
Gratz on the birthday present.  For river tables, the primary use of the router will be as a slab flattening jig.  Ideally, a bottom clearing bit in 8mm shank, but 1/4 will do if you're in NA.  Size will just be smaller and clearing passes more just to avoid shank deflection.


In North America (US at least) the OF1400 comes with a 1/2" collet. That would be my choice for most, if not all, of the cuts I do with this mid-sized router.
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation

Offline woodferret

  • Posts: 105
Re: Router 1400
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2021, 05:31 PM »
Thanks for the correction.  I've got the 1010 on the brain :P

Offline Pixie

  • Posts: 2
Re: Router 1400
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2021, 11:34 AM »
I really appreciate the advice. What I want to do is create a channel for a river table on a single slab. I do not want to put two separate slabs together and epoxy in between. I kind of agree with Paul on the “fad” comment. Im a newbie in routing. My goal is to make channels as I mentioned before and to flatten slabs, as I don’t have a planer or a jointer.