Author Topic: Question about TSO Parallel Guide System: Right Hand versus "Both Hands" Kit  (Read 2749 times)

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Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 202
One follow up question on using one guide only to break down sheet goods: With one guide, I have to make a rip first to take care of the factory edge, then do a crosscut to get side that is perfect 90, and then can do my parallel rip. In short, it's rip, cross, rip to get a parallel cut. With two guides, however, I can skip the crosscut at this point because the two guide give me the same length on both ends. So it's just rip and rip like in this video:

All correct?

This is a good video by Eric, I have watched it a number of times.  Not sure if I am understanding you because you still need (or should) to do a crosscut either with 1 or 2 guides in place.  The 4' end of the sheet is still the factory edge and you should square it up to one of your already ripped long edges.

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Offline Josh2

  • Posts: 29
Yes, of course. I need the crosscut. The question is when and that matters for changing blades, changing the orientation of the rail etc etc. So let me try to say it more clearly:

- With two guides (Rip, Rip, crosscut, crosscut): Rip for factory edge, parallel rip using guides, crosscut for factory edge, crosscut(s) for final piece(s) (That is what Eric does in the video)
- With one guide (Rip, crosscut, rip, crosscut): Rip for factory edge, crosscut for factory edge and 90, parallel rip using guides and square, crosscut(s) for final piece

Is it correct to say that one guide requires the second process because I only reference of one side and not both? Two guides make it possible to do all the ripping first because I reference of both sides.

One follow up question on using one guide only to break down sheet goods: With one guide, I have to make a rip first to take care of the factory edge, then do a crosscut to get side that is perfect 90, and then can do my parallel rip. In short, it's rip, cross, rip to get a parallel cut. With two guides, however, I can skip the crosscut at this point because the two guide give me the same length on both ends. So it's just rip and rip like in this video:

All correct?

This is a good video by Eric, I have watched it a number of times.  Not sure if I am understanding you because you still need (or should) to do a crosscut either with 1 or 2 guides in place.  The 4' end of the sheet is still the factory edge and you should square it up to one of your already ripped long edges.

Offline m8

  • Posts: 46
While I don't disagree that the TPG system is quite expensive, rivaling the cost of the track saw itself, I also have to say that there are few things in my workshop that I think have justified their price so well. The speed, accuracy and repeatability that it gives you when cutting any kind of panel surface is just incredible.

Even my father -- a longtime carpenter and avowed skeptic of all my "expensive green toys" -- was floored by how well the TPGs worked when he came by to help me with a project a few months ago and it left him rethinking investing into the system himself.

The quote above is why I have not been able to convince myself that TSO PGS is too expensive.  I decided at the end of last month to go ahead and pull the trigger and go all in but I hesitated too long when I received the e-mail notifying me that it was back in stock.

Offline TSO_Products

  • Retailer
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  • Posts: 270
    • TSO Products LLC
One follow up question on using one guide only to break down sheet goods: With one guide, I have to make a rip first to take care of the factory edge, then do a crosscut to get side that is perfect 90, and then can do my parallel rip. In short, it's rip, cross, rip to get a parallel cut. With two guides, however, I can skip the crosscut at this point because the two guide give me the same length on both ends. So it's just rip and rip like in this video:

All correct?

@Josh2 - you're abolutely correct. No matter what else you plan to do with a sheet of material: first make on straight edge - replacing the factory edge  however "good" it looks.
Then reference off that absoutley straight edge - ideally with a GRS-16 or GRS-16 PE on your guide rail to  get a straight and squared edge of the first straightlined edge.

the next cut(s) can be made parallel with the same guide rail and GRS-16 simply by adding (1)TPG T-track and FlipStop.

Hans

Offline Mike Goetzke

  • Posts: 543
One follow up question on using one guide only to break down sheet goods: With one guide, I have to make a rip first to take care of the factory edge, then do a crosscut to get side that is perfect 90, and then can do my parallel rip. In short, it's rip, cross, rip to get a parallel cut. With two guides, however, I can skip the crosscut at this point because the two guide give me the same length on both ends. So it's just rip and rip like in this video:

All correct?

Now why don't I see this video link?

Offline Mike Goetzke

  • Posts: 543
I went "all-out" on this system when it first came out and still couldn't be happier.

I'm an active hobbyist and do break down sheet good but have also used this system exclusively for dimensional lumber and hardwood crosscuts that one would generally do on a miter saw. I'm surprised others haven't commented on this as often as sheet goods application. Maybe because working out of my garage/shop it takes more time to set up my miter saw on it's mobile base than to take out my track saw and TSO components.

Mike

(Sheet good question - do the pros find they need to rip a reference surface? All the years I've been using sheet goods I have found the long edges to be perfectly straight but many times the crosscut not square.)

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 6255
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
@MikeGoetzke, I find on YT videos if you use the copy function on the YT video it will not post here. If I copy and past the address bar it does work here.

We straight line every factory edge. The sheets I purchase come 1/2" oversized.

@Josh2, your process is correct. That is one of the big advantages to the two arm setup. By doing all the rips first, you can square a short edge to either long edge, use a single arm PG set up on a square to process all of the cross cuts.

Tom

Offline Josh2

  • Posts: 29
Mike: Here is the link for the video:

Hans/TSO and Tom: Thanks! My question was actually different. Of course, I need a straight edge. The question is about another difference between one hand PGS and both hand TPG. Tom just confirmed my understanding that with one hand PGS, I need two straight edges with 90 degree (one rift one, one cross cut). With both hands, I just need a straight edge rift and can worry about the straight edge crosscut later because I reference of both sides.

So here is my summary of the advantages of both hand TPG based on the answers here. Maybe it's helpful for others:
1. Easier and faster to rip full panels. But it is possible to rip 96" with a single arm.
2. Better support for thin stock. TSO still wants to post a video on that, I think.
3. Different process for breaking down sheet goods: Two arms make it possible to do all the rips first and crosscut later. One arm requires a straight and square rip and crosscut before doing parallel rips. The linked video above is a great illustration of the process with two arms.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 66
Now why don't I see this video link?

I can't see it either because Josh didn't copy the correct link.  The short version that starts with "youtu.be" won't work, it must the full URL.

Here is the video:

« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 11:13 AM by MikeGE »