Author Topic: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?  (Read 61477 times)

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Offline Corwin

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #90 on: October 11, 2015, 08:24 PM »
Corwin,
Thanks for the reply and the new video.  It is definatly clearer now.  For the hinged model I assume you are setting the router bit depth to kiss the top of the ridge on the rail that the hinge will be fastened to.  What size router bit are you using? 3/4"
And yes I'm off today but I have a lot going at the moment (trying to clean out our garage and make some selving. Also I don't have any extra sheet goods at the moment to make the jig out of.
I know what you mean about making jigs, they make a lot of jobs so much easier and much more accurate.
Again thanks for all the work you put into this, I will definatly try to make one of these soon.

Rusty

I figured it would become clearer. And yes, I am depicting setting the final depth of cut to match the top of the T-track portion of the guide rail -- that way the wing and rail sit flat once the hinge is installed. The bit size doesn't matter [yes, I used a 3/4" in multiple passes] as it is the depth of the rebate that matters. The width should be wider than the portion of the hinge that will be mounted there. I don't intend for the hinge to index off the inside edge of the rebate, so extra room is my preference. I use 1-1/2" piano hinge with my jigs - the piano hinge in the animation was downloaded from the SketchUp warehouse and was supposed to also be 1-1/2", but there's a longer story there... Mounting holes need to be drilled out as needed. The hinge doesn't align 'exactly' over the top of the T-track, but so what; there is an amount of slop with my hardware, and that works fine -- just pull rail tight to the wing before tightening down.

No pressure (or is that -- oh, never mind [tongue]) with making your own jig. I'm just kidding. Well, kind of...  [big grin]

Sorry to dominate this thread. But then again, it is threads like this that have prompted me to take the time on this project. Maybe in the future we can instead be discussing how to, rather than if we can cut narrow stock with our track saws.

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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #91 on: October 11, 2015, 08:43 PM »
Corwin,

I would love to do an un-edited video to show your original idea in real life - giving you credit or course?  I don't have the time to do your flip down jig.

Peter

Offline Corwin

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #92 on: October 11, 2015, 09:35 PM »
Corwin,

I would love to do an un-edited video to show your original idea in real life - giving you credit or course?  I don't have the time to do your flip down jig.

Peter

I would love that too!  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Once you've made the basic 'instructional' version, I think you may just find the time... Well, sometime, that is.  [wink]

With the first version, one need consider the height of the spacer (or piece you are attempting to duplicate) between the fence and rail. The saw's motor housing sticks out to the left of the rail and anything too tall, and too close (as it would be in this case,) may interfere -- the saw's depth of cut enters into this... The winged version eliminates this issue. This same consideration comes into play when cutting, for instance, sheet material using the method shown in the beginning of the animation. There, I could have used the first piece I cut -- the one that matches the width of your rail -- below the rail, to cut the narrow strips for the fences IF I had a spacer that was shorter and wouldn't be in the way. Same type situation solved the same way.

Offline Corwin

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #93 on: October 19, 2015, 05:51 AM »
Here's the final version of my animation:

Narrow Strip Jig

Hope you enjoy it. Kind of a BIG file. Takes over 4 minutes to load SketchUp...  [scared]   So, this is as far as I'll take this animation.

Offline Rusty Miller

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #94 on: October 20, 2015, 01:28 PM »
Corwin,
Fantastic job! I will be making one of these.  Thank you for all the hard work you put into the video and just coming up with the jig itself.  You're a "Good man Charley Brown"!

Rusty
Rusty Miller
I'd rather be woodworking!

Offline Parquet-Dave

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #95 on: October 23, 2015, 06:35 PM »
Corwin
Thanks for posting your jig idea.
I've made one using scrap ply this week on a job site.
I've used it for ripping parquet blocks and also managed to cut a ramp threshold strip from an off-cut of square stock.

All tasks I would have previously used a table saw for. 
Having bought the TS55 for cutting parquet borders initially, I've found myself finding different tasks that the saw can safely complete,  and I've got to say I'm very happy so far. 
Your Jig has opened up a whole raft of other tasks that I can use the saw for so thank you once again.

Offline Corwin

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #96 on: October 23, 2015, 09:49 PM »
Welcome to the FOG, Dave! And thank you for your comments.  [big grin]


Offline brodiebrodie

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #97 on: November 06, 2016, 11:59 AM »
Hello,

This is a very interesting discussion, but I can't seem to see any of the the youtube videos (all private or removed)

Can any one re-post?

Cheers

Offline air19

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #98 on: November 22, 2016, 08:51 PM »
The link on reply #93 works.  The previous ones do not.  But #93 is his latest and it's really good.  Makes me rethink about the space my table saw is taking up. 


Offline Corwin

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #99 on: November 22, 2016, 09:08 PM »
The link on reply #93 works.  The previous ones do not.  But #93 is his latest and it's really good.  Makes me rethink about the space my table saw is taking up.

Thanks!

The previous links were for versions of the same animation, but at progressive levels of completion. So, you aren't missing anything in the older links.

You might also like to check out my [hugely unpopular] A Different Parallel Guide and MFT Zero-Clearance Fence & Fenced Sled threads.  [unsure]

Offline dabfog

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #100 on: May 04, 2021, 11:43 AM »
Try this plunge into the end of the stock just far enough in to allow the full exposed blade to "plungein". The gently back up a 1/4", then complete your cut.
Also, how long are your pieces? Can you rig up a set of scrap pieces so there is a trench, with an outer "wall" to the right of the track and a "sacrificial fence" block at the end?
Say some scrap or extra stock brad nailed to a sheet of plywood with a piece wide enough to support the track, another to the right of that piece to just admit the work piece and the sacrificial stop block at the far end?

Offline Packard

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #101 on: May 04, 2021, 04:47 PM »
I made this simple jig.  A thin kerf blade will save a lot of material if you are making many strips.  I use a feather board with mine.  The 6" width is fine.  I feel more comfortable with an 8" width pusher.  Long lengths are an issue.  I find 4' is the longest that is easily handled. 

Short lengths are an issue too.  They cannot kickback, but they can kick up. A sacrificial hold down will resolve that issue.  2½ to 3 feet is the sweet spot for this jig.  If you need shorter lengths, then rip them longer and then cut them to length.  So I would cut 3 foot pieces and then get three 11" ones from each cut piece.  More efficient and safer. 

« Last Edit: May 04, 2021, 04:49 PM by Packard »

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #102 on: May 04, 2021, 05:20 PM »
The heading isn't clear, but by TS, the thread is about the Track Saw. (Some people use the Grr-ripper to make 1/8" strips with ease on the table saw.).
« Last Edit: May 04, 2021, 05:22 PM by ChuckM »

Offline Packard

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #103 on: May 04, 2021, 06:30 PM »
Yes, I thought TS was table saw. I bought the track saw as an adjunct to the table saw, but it has been seeing more service as I get used to it.  But the table saw and the radial arm saw do some things better than the track saw.

Do most people get rid of their table saws after buying a track saw?

Offline CeeJay

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #104 on: May 04, 2021, 07:27 PM »
Do most people get rid of their table saws after buying a track saw?

Nope. Still use my table saw 90% of the time.


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Offline ChuckS

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #105 on: May 04, 2021, 08:02 PM »
Can't speak for those who handle mostly sheet goods, but haven't come across anyone here who does hardwood furniture work and ditches their table saw after getting the track saw.

Online Crazyraceguy

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #106 on: May 04, 2021, 08:23 PM »
I do both sheet goods work and hardwood too. I would never even think about getting rid of a tablesaw, but the tracksaw gets it's share of work too.  They each have their strengths.
Tracksaws are great for breaking down sheet goods, but I see them as finish cuts. I see way too many people, especially Youtubers, consider that a preliminary step to do the final cut on a tablesaw.
Tablesaw definitely for repetitive strips in sheet goods, dados, rabbets, etc.
I certainly wouldn't taper a table leg with a tracksaw, but they excel on cuts were the object to be cut is large/long/heavy.
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Offline Packard

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Re: Is ripping narrow stock the TS achilles heel?
« Reply #107 on: May 05, 2021, 08:19 AM »
I had long assumed that people morphed from being table saw users to being track saw users and I also assumed that most would hang onto their table saws. 

For those who only have a track saw, I apologize for this topic drift. 

If you do still have a table saw, then trying to rip narrow stock with a track saw seems akin to trying to teach a racehorse to run on his hind legs.  You might get him to make some progress, but it will be against his nature, and he surely will make slow progress.

I bought the track saw to work with sheet goods and there it excels, being sufficiently precise as well as being safer to handle the large panels.  It also makes cleaner cuts than my table saw on plywood and melamine clad particleboard. 

In all cases I try to remember to use the best tool for the task at hand whether it is a track saw, table saw or radial arm saw, sliding table miter saw, hand held circular saw or chop saw.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2021, 08:22 AM by Packard »