Author Topic: Domino pricing posted.  (Read 10891 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline David W.

  • Posts: 33
Domino pricing posted.
« on: January 23, 2007, 04:00 PM »
See http://www.festoolusa.com/Web_files/fes_DF500_web-mailer.pdf

I for one am somewhat disappointed by the minimal introductory discount offered on the Domino compared to the TS75 and RO150.

For a $700 item a 6% ($40) discount ( only 4% ($30) on the $750 Package ) is quite a bit less than I would have wanted.   

Sigh.... maybe it is ok to wait on this unless I need it right away... (just leave it in the bank for 8 months to make up the difference).

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Dan Clark

  • Posts: 540
    • talkFestool
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2007, 04:10 PM »
Thanks for posting!

Hmmm...  The price is not as bad as I thought it would be.   I expected the intro price to be over $700.   The price on the Domino tenon pack seems high, but then again it includes about $110 worth of cutters.   

It will be interesting to see if the US follows the trend in the rest of the world.   

Dan.

Offline Tom Wales

  • Posts: 43
  • Soldotna, Alaska
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2007, 05:28 PM »
Where do you see that the domino pack comes with the cutters??
Tom

Offline Tom Wales

  • Posts: 43
  • Soldotna, Alaska
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2007, 05:34 PM »
Nevermind... There it is on McFeely's.  It is nice to know that the cutters come with the dominos. thanks Tom

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5265
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2007, 11:02 PM »
See http://www.festoolusa.com/Web_files/fes_DF500_web-mailer.pdf

I for one am somewhat disappointed by the minimal introductory discount offered on the Domino compared to the TS75 and RO150.

For a $700 item a 6% ($40) discount ( only 4% ($30) on the $750 Package ) is quite a bit less than I would have wanted.   

Sigh.... maybe it is ok to wait on this unless I need it right away... (just leave it in the bank for 8 months to make up the difference).


If you buy the big kit (DF 500 Q Set) and the whole caboodle (Cutter & Domino tenon Assortment Systainer) it comes to about a 10% discount, compared to buying all the pieces separately in the summer.

I wonder how much they pay for this stuff in Europe and Australia? We usually get pretty attractive prices in NA compared to the rest of the world. But, I guess the falling value of the $US and the evolution of Festool's marketing strategy will catch up with us sooner or later.


Offline Brian 57

  • Posts: 55
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2007, 09:00 AM »
In the UK, with just one supplied cutter, about $1000 - think how we feel.
Regards

Offline Lou Miller

  • Posts: 480
  • North Wales, PA
    • Some of my work
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2007, 09:03 AM »
In the UK, with just one supplied cutter, about $1000 - think how we feel.
Regards

I feel for ya... I'm just wondering though, certainly not complaining, why do you think things are more expensive there then here?

Offline Bill_de

  • Posts: 7
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2007, 09:35 AM »
The TS75 and RO150 were not quite as unique as the Domino. If an additional $15 discount is the deciding factor, this is probably not the tool for you.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2007, 09:37 AM by Bill_de »
Bill

Offline Brian 57

  • Posts: 55
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2007, 08:11 PM »
Any reply would just be opinion/impression rather than being supported by any sort of analysis, but among the UK factors are :- Smaller market relative to the USA; lower levels of competition, fewer choices; manufacturers' attitudes e.g. car manufacturers have been known to refer to the UK as "Treasure Island". You might add that the Brits may tend to be less aggressive bargainers, though that would appear to be changing.
I believe that US prices for Festool are not only lower than UK prices, but also lower than European or Australian prices, to name two.

Offline Bob Marino

  • Posts: 3256
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2007, 10:24 PM »
Any reply would just be opinion/impression rather than being supported by any sort of analysis, but among the UK factors are :- Smaller market relative to the USA; lower levels of competition, fewer choices; manufacturers' attitudes e.g. car manufacturers have been known to refer to the UK as "Treasure Island". You might add that the Brits may tend to be less aggressive bargainers, though that would appear to be changing.
I believe that US prices for Festool are not only lower than UK prices, but also lower than European or Australian prices, to name two.


I think the Festool USA prices are the lowest in the world.

Bob

bOB
Former Festool  Dealer since 2002; user well before that!

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3763
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2007, 08:43 AM »
Thanks for posting!

Hmmm...  The price is not as bad as I thought it would be.   I expected the intro price to be over $700.   The price on the Domino tenon pack seems high, but then again it includes about $110 worth of cutters.   

It will be interesting to see if the US follows the trend in the rest of the world.   

Dan.

Does this mean that cutters DO NOT come with the machine?  The fact that they might not be included with the early sales is more of a concern to me than the price. At any rate, the $700 price tag is still lower than what I had been led to expect.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Festool USA

  • Festool USA Employee
    FOG Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 8430
    • Festool USA
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2007, 09:42 AM »
Tinker,

There are two flavors of the DOMINO, the power tool only (574258) and the power tool + the trim and cross stops (574283) which is being called the DF 500 Plus "SET" by Festool.  The two stops are available separately - cross stop (493488) and trim stop (493487) but purchasing the "SET" saves you $30 off of individual prices.  The DOMINO in either configuration includes the DOMINO, systainer 2, operating manual, operating tool, support bracket and the D5 cutter only.

I would recommend that you consider the DOMINO dowel assortment (493301) with your initial purchase of the DOMINO which includes an assortment of all sizes of Dominos and each of the four sizes of cutters in a systainer.  You can also purchase each size of Dominos or cutters individually.

Below are the introductory prices for the DOMINO and all associated accessories.  Introductory prices expire on 5/31/07.

(574258) DOMINO DF 500 Q-PLUS $660.00
(574283) DOMINO SET DF 500 Q-PLUS SET Includes Trim Stop and Cross Stop $720.00
(PM574258) DOMINO DF 500 Q-PLUS + CT Mini $906.50
(P2574258) DOMINO DF 500 Q-PLUS + CT 22 $1,034.00
(P3574258) DOMINO DF 500 Q-PLUS + CT33 $1,076.50
(PM574283) DOMINO SET DF 500 Q-PLUS SET + CT Mini $966.50
(P2574283) DOMINO SET DF 500 Q-PLUS SET + CT 22 $1,094.00
(P3574283) DOMINO SET DF 500 Q-PLUS SET + CT33 $1,136.50
(493301) DOMINO Assortment Systainer Includes 1105 DOMINO TENONS and 4 CUTTERS $200.00
(493296) DOMINO D 5X19X30 quantity 1800 $65.00
(493297) DOMINO D 6X20X40 quantity 1140 $65.00
(493298) DOMINO D 8X22X40 quantity 780 $65.00
(493299) DOMINO D 8X22X50 quantity 600 $65.00
(493300) DOMINO D10X24X50 quantity 510 $65.00
(493490) Domino cutter 5mm $27.00
(493491) Domino cutter 6mm $28.00
(493492) Domino cutter 8mm $29.00
(493493) Domino cutter 10mm $30.00
(493487) Trim stop $40.00
(493488) Cross stop $50.00

Offline David Mayer

  • Posts: 1
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2007, 06:59 PM »
Okay, here is my question. I am satisfied with the price of the domino tenons each but I am just a woodworker in my home shop just like many of you guys. So we start with a $200 systainer full of those little fellows. Now I will use lots of the smaller ones but not so many of the larger ones. Let's say five years from now I have bought lots of several sizes but not I run out of a size I rarely use. Will I have to buy a $65.00 package or will some dealers break a box and sell a bag of them. I can see this is going to be an issue for others, too!
David Mayer
david@mayer.net

Offline bill-e

  • Posts: 504
  • Rindge, New Hampshire, USA
    • New Hampshire Woodworker
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2007, 08:45 PM »
Personal opinion here.  The large ones will be used more than you think.  4 legged table - 16 for the legs/apron.  If you have a shelf or stretcher and another 4 to 16.  I think once you have the Domino you will find all kinds of uses for it since unlike a biscuit it is used to add strength or even make a joint.

But if I had a size that I rarely used I think I'd just let them run out and I'd use either the next size up or down depending on the application.

Offline carpenter

  • Posts: 5
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2007, 02:38 AM »

I wonder how much they pay for this stuff in Europe and Australia? We usually get pretty attractive prices in NA compared to the rest of the world. But, I guess the falling value of the $US and the evolution of Festool's marketing strategy will catch up with us sooner or later.
[/quote]

In Australia the complete package (domino & all accessories, cutters, in systainer plus another systainer full of domino dowels) is the only way to go. This costs A$1670. The US$ equivalent is US$1298.90 at todays conversion rate. Thats not a typo. You guys have amazingly cheap tools. Thats the benefit of having a big population. Please don't complain about the price.  ;)

Offline Cynric Williams

  • Posts: 22
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2007, 03:18 AM »
In the UK, with just one supplied cutter, about $1000 - think how we feel.
Regards

I feel for ya... I'm just wondering though, certainly not complaining, why do you think things are more expensive there then here?
The general rule is take the dollars price and convert it to pounds. It's not known as rip off britain for nothing.

Offline MarkusS

  • Posts: 59
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2007, 04:05 AM »
The german price for the Domino-Set is EUR 798,-- including sales tax (19%), converted to USD this are ridiculous 1036.-- Dollars. Minus sales tax this are $870.--

The german set contains:
- Domino DF 500-Q
- Domino Cutter D5
- Systainer 2
- Cross Stop
- Support Bracket
- Operating Wrench

As far as I see, this is the same package as the american DF 500 Q Set which is offered for $720 (intro price).

AFAIR there was a intro price in Germany too but I don't remember it.

There were some heated discussions in the german woodworker forums when Festool introduced the Domino last fall. An other german company (Mafell) too introduced last year a joining system which has several similarities to the Domino, the DuoDübler ("DuoJoiner") http://www.mafell.de/produktkatalog/index.php?ID_O_PRODUCT=5109&sLanguage=German but drills round holes for round joiners which are widely available. The Mafell can drill one or two holes a time, the distance between the holes are 32 mm (standard distance in cabinets), the drill depth is adjustable and you can drill holes from 5 to 16 mm diameter. The price range is from EUR 550 to EUR 700 (depending on model).

Regards
Markus

Offline Wim

  • Posts: 286
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #17 on: February 07, 2007, 04:39 AM »
In Holland it is the same story as in other European countries and Australia. I had my Domino set for $990.00, the systainer with domino's for $264.00 and the cutters for $38.00 (rounded prices). So we are on the same level as Australia but living close to Germany, we should pay less because of the transport-costs. Is there anybody who can explain these differences (apart from marketing issues)?
At a lower price I would like my Festool even more. ;-))
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 04:41 AM by Wim »

Offline Bill Walton

  • Posts: 16
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #18 on: February 07, 2007, 08:00 AM »
I'm curious, the pricing I saw stated a $40 savings on the tool alone but only a $30 savings if you bought the kit with the tool and 2 attachments.

Offline Bob Marino

  • Posts: 3256
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2007, 03:07 PM »
I'm curious, the pricing I saw stated a $40 savings on the tool alone but only a $30 savings if you bought the kit with the tool and 2 attachments.

 Bill,

 The $30.00 savings is in addition to the $40.00 Introductory Price on the unit itself.

 Bob
Former Festool  Dealer since 2002; user well before that!

Offline Dan Lyke

  • Posts: 321
    • Flutterby.net
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2007, 05:43 PM »
Will I have to buy a $65.00 package or will some dealers break a box and sell a bag of them.

I am but a newbie woodworker, still trying to clear the refinishing and drawer repair type jobs off my list so I can get to the first task where I actually have to cut a mortise. However, It seems like one of the cool things about the Domino is that it may be usable just as a mortise cutter.

At which point, if $65 is too much inventory to carry, you could probably rip a domino shape from whatever other stock you have lying around fairly quickly, or, where it's reasonable to do so, cut the tenon into the other piece. Right?

In my limited repertoire thus far I've taken an X-acto knife to stock to fit it in a biscuit slot or cut glue slots down the side of a dowel for pinning, so at worst this seems like "rip a piece to thickness and width, cut it to length, and drag a knife down the edges or sand 'em to make it fit the rounded mortise".

Unless something miraculous happens I'll be routing my mortises with the OF1010 for the foreseeable future, but the mind is turning about some chairs where the Domino would be perfect for cutting the mortises, but I might not even use any of the birch Festool dominos in the project.
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline David W.

  • Posts: 33
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2007, 09:18 PM »
I'm curious, the pricing I saw stated a $40 savings on the tool alone but only a $30 savings if you bought the kit with the tool and 2 attachments.

 Bill,

 The $30.00 savings is in addition to the $40.00 Introductory Price on the unit itself.

 Bob

The intro price on the combo (domino and both stops) is $720,  after 5/31 it becomes $750.   Isn't that only $30 savings?

I think what Bob is saying is that if you bought the combo before 5/31 you would pay $720, but if you bought all the pieces separately after 5/31, you would pay $700 + 50 + 40 = $790.   But it wouldn't make sense to buy it that way (unless the combo package is being cancelled after 5/31)?



Offline john stevens

  • Posts: 819
  • Ardmore, PA
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2007, 11:30 PM »
Here's another question regarding what to buy along with the Domino--

I was assuming I'd buy the box of assorted dominos and four cutters.  But when would I bother using a 6mm domino instead of a 5mm domino?  Or for that matter an 8mm instead of a 10mm?

It seems to me that if we stick to standard stock thicknesses (16mm = 5/8" and 18mm ~ 3/4") and go with the rule of thumb that the tenon should be 1/3 the stock thickness, then the 5mm will work fine.  For stock that's milled to a true 4/4 (~24mm or 25mm), the 8mm domino would be perfect, but the 10mm would probably work fine, yeilding side walls of 7mm, or > 1/4".  When you get up to nominal 6/4 stock and larger, the 10mm domino would be the way to go.

What am I missing here?

Regards,

John
What this world needs is a good retreat.
--Captain Beefheart

Offline Dan Uhlir

  • Posts: 138
    • www.danuhlir.com
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2007, 12:03 AM »
Hi John I'm replying in reference to your question about 5mm vs. 6mm or 8mm vs 10mm when I install a binding on a snow ski, there is a world of difference between 3.5mm and 4.0mm.I'm not sure this translates exactly but point is we all want furniture grade exacto mundo joints  :.Or at least I do, I should know by now to only speak for myself, hope you see my point.thenks dan

Offline carpenter

  • Posts: 5
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2007, 01:44 AM »
Will I have to buy a $65.00 package or will some dealers break a box and sell a bag of them.

I am but a newbie woodworker, still trying to clear the refinishing and drawer repair type jobs off my list so I can get to the first task where I actually have to cut a mortise. However, It seems like one of the cool things about the Domino is that it may be usable just as a mortise cutter.

At which point, if $65 is too much inventory to carry, you could probably rip a domino shape from whatever other stock you have lying around fairly quickly, or, where it's reasonable to do so, cut the tenon into the other piece. Right?

In my limited repertoire thus far I've taken an X-acto knife to stock to fit it in a biscuit slot or cut glue slots down the side of a dowel for pinning, so at worst this seems like "rip a piece to thickness and width, cut it to length, and drag a knife down the edges or sand 'em to make it fit the rounded mortise".

Unless something miraculous happens I'll be routing my mortises with the OF1010 for the foreseeable future, but the mind is turning about some chairs where the Domino would be perfect for cutting the mortises, but I might not even use any of the birch Festool dominos in the project.


I feel you underestimate a crucial aspect of the "Dominatrix". Part of the seductive ease is the speed at which you can produce a join. Having a supply of ready made domino dowels is essential to this speed. Sure you can make your own, but why? Over here in Oz we already have Festool dealers who supply the dowels in the smaller quantities instead of the bulk pack. I recently ordered a bag of 100 10x50, this only cost A$20 & was no more expensive/piece than buying them in the bulk pack. It would cost me a lot more than $20 to manufacture 100 precision made dowels with glue groove in them!

Offline carpenter

  • Posts: 5
Re: Domino pricing posted.
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2007, 01:51 AM »
Here's another question regarding what to buy along with the Domino--

I was assuming I'd buy the box of assorted dominos and four cutters.  But when would I bother using a 6mm domino instead of a 5mm domino?  Or for that matter an 8mm instead of a 10mm?

It seems to me that if we stick to standard stock thicknesses (16mm = 5/8" and 18mm ~ 3/4") and go with the rule of thumb that the tenon should be 1/3 the stock thickness, then the 5mm will work fine.  For stock that's milled to a true 4/4 (~24mm or 25mm), the 8mm domino would be perfect, but the 10mm would probably work fine, yeilding side walls of 7mm, or > 1/4".  When you get up to nominal 6/4 stock and larger, the 10mm domino would be the way to go.

What am I missing here?

Regards,

John

Your logic is sound John, but in practice having the variety works well. For example, you could fit a set of paired tenons of 8mm where a pair of 10mm would be too much. Its little situations like this that enhance the variety of the machine. Besides, if you just bite the bullet & get the Systainer full of domino dowels, just use what you need & replace as you go. Don't worry, you'll end up using all the sizes.