Author Topic: converting voltage requirement  (Read 1126 times)

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Offline Dollar Bill

  • Posts: 64
converting voltage requirement
« on: January 19, 2022, 10:39 AM »
I have the opportunity to buy a pre-owned ETS EC 150/5 sander. It is 240V. Does anyone know of a way of either 1) converting the sander to 120V or 2) converting my supply voltage to 240V, i.e., step-up transformer. #1 is preferrable.

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Offline Coen

  • Posts: 1573
Re: converting voltage requirement
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2022, 11:52 AM »
Don't you have split phase? So 120V and 120V 120 degrees shifted? Connect between phases and you get 240V. I don't think the ETS EC cares about the 60 Hz  vs 50 Hz as everything is probably rectified anyway.

Offline Dollar Bill

  • Posts: 64
Re: converting voltage requirement
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2022, 05:03 PM »
Don't you have split phase? So 120V and 120V 120 degrees shifted? Connect between phases and you get 240V. I don't think the ETS EC cares about the 60 Hz  vs 50 Hz as everything is probably rectified anyway.
I am not familiar with split phase. At my residence I have 120V single (0 deg.) phase. I also have 240V single phase but the 240 is not available at the outlets. In addition, my CT-26E is also 120V single phase and therefore I wouldn't be able to plug the sander into my dust extractor.

Offline Coen

  • Posts: 1573
Re: converting voltage requirement
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2022, 05:58 PM »
Don't you have split phase? So 120V and 120V 120 degrees shifted? Connect between phases and you get 240V. I don't think the ETS EC cares about the 60 Hz  vs 50 Hz as everything is probably rectified anyway.
I am not familiar with split phase. At my residence I have 120V single (0 deg.) phase. I also have 240V single phase but the 240 is not available at the outlets. In addition, my CT-26E is also 120V single phase and therefore I wouldn't be able to plug the sander into my dust extractor.

If you have 120V and 240V, you have a split-phase system. Meaning you a 3-wire supply; 120V, 120V shifted 180 degrees and a neutral, whereas in 3-phase systems they are shifted 120 degrees. Connecting in between two 180 degrees shifted phases gives double the voltage, that's how you end up with 240V in the US. If proper 3-phase with 120V phase-to-ground voltage, connecting between the phases would give SQRT(3) * 120 = 207V

Yes, having the tool on a different outlet than the CT would be a pain.

Anyway, if I look in EKAT, comparing a 120V ETS EC (#202118) with a 230V one (#202874) the electronics parts 24, 25, 26 are different. That would be #500255 "Electronic 120V", #705195 "Socket housing 120V" and #500257 "Electronic 120V" for a item price of respectively $151, $10 and $151.

So euh... ship it across the ocean?  [cool]

EDIT: Forgot part 4 "Stator 120V" at $78

All prices cut off before the decimal.

So that would make it $400 to convert a 230V ETS EC to 120V. I don't think that would make any sense.

Transformer would be possible too, but not all make as nice a sine wave and some things are sensitive to that. Also; who wants to lug a transformer around?

In Europe the common single-phase supply is 2-wire; 230V, neutral, or 3-wire if earth is supplied by the net. But most single phase supplies just means you have 2 unemployed fuse-holders in a sealed box. Pay 200-300 bucks and the utility company stops by, puts in 2 more fuses and changes the meter.

EDIT 2; cord not included. In 230V land, Festool only has one thickness Plug-It Cord (per country); a thin one. Double the voltage, half the current, half the the voltage loss, a quarter the power loss. So no need for a higher lower gauge (another retarded unit) cord.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2022, 06:09 PM by Coen »

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 1115
Re: converting voltage requirement
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2022, 06:05 AM »
Could you just install a 240V outlet? Seems way easier.

Offline Dollar Bill

  • Posts: 64
Re: converting voltage requirement
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2022, 07:41 AM »
Could you just install a 240V outlet? Seems way easier.
I have one. The problem is powering the sander through my CT-26E, which is 120V