Author Topic: Aftermarket Blades for TS75 (List of Part Numbers with Specifications)  (Read 4742 times)

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Offline rostyvyg

  • Posts: 11
I went on a quest lately looking for alternative blades for my TS75 and noticed a lot of concerns as it relates to using different blades with the same rail (splinter guard). Looking at blade kerf does not bring clarity here if you don't know the blade plate thickness and can't calculate the offset. The problem is - many manufacturers do not publish plate thickness, so unless you call them or take a plunge, buy a blade and measure it (as I did with Amana/AGE blades) there is no way to clear this confusion. So, here for everyone to use as a reference is my limited compilation of manufacturers and their part numbers with blade specifications. If you see some measurements missing, please feel free to post your own observations. Let's make this list as complete as possible together:


MODEL #             TEETH   GRIND KERF   PLATE   OFFSET   APPLICATION

Festool    
495378                   16   ATB    2.6 mm   1.9 mm   0.35 mm   Rip hard and soft woods
495379                   18   ATB    2.6 mm   1.9 mm   0.35 mm   Rip building panels, wood and soft plastics
495380                   36   ATB    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   General purpose blade for wood and soft plastics; fine rip cut
495381                   52   ATB    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   Fine for smooth cuts in veneered plywood, sheet goods, melamine, and hard and soft woods
495382                   60   TCG    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   Solid Surface / Laminate
495383                    72   TCG    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   Non-ferrous materials, especially aluminium; acrylics and hard plastics
495284                   36   ATB    2.2 mm   1.9 mm   0.15 mm   Steel

Amana/A.G.E.
MD210-160           16    ATB    2.6 mm   1.9 mm   0.35 mm   Rip blade
MD210-182           18   ATB    2.6 mm   1.9 mm   0.35 mm   Wood, building panels & soft plastics
MD210-360           36   ATB    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   General purpose
MD210-523           52   ATB    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   Fine crosscut in sheet goods, melamine   
MD210-608           60   ATB    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   Solid surface and laminate
MD210-725           72   TCG    2.4 mm   1.9 mm   0.25 mm   Aluminium and plastics
STL210-30           36   TCG    2.2 mm   1.9 mm   0.15 mm   Alloy & Virgin Steel

Oshlun
SBFT-210036      36   ATB   2.4 mm   1.8 mm   0.3 mm   Universal & General Purpose, Hardwood, Softwood, Soft Plastics
SBFT-210052           52   ATB   2.4 mm   1.8 mm   0.3 mm   Fine Tooth & Crosscut, Hardwood, Softwood, Melamine   
SBFT-210072A           72   TCG   2.4 mm   1.8 mm   0.3 mm   Aluminum, brass, hard plastics   


Tenryu
PSW-21018CBD3           18   ATB    2.3 mm   1.6 mm   0.35 mm   Fast ripping on wood
PSW-21036CBD3           36   ATB    2.2 mm   1.6 mm   0.30 mm   Combination (Ripping and cross cutting on wood)
PSW-21054AB3            54   ATAFR2.2 mm   1.6 mm   0.30 mm   Fine cross cutting on wood
PSL-21052D3                   52   TCG    2.3 mm   1.6 mm   0.35 mm   Laminate, composite, or flooring materials cutting
PSA-21068D3                   68   TCG    2.3 mm   1.6 mm   0.35 mm   Aluminium cutting


CMT
290.210.24M                   24   ATB    2.8 mm   1.8 mm   0.5 mm   Rip hard and soft woods
291.210.36M                   36   ATB    2.8 mm   1.8 mm   0.5 mm   Rip and crosscuts on soft/hardwood and plywood
292.210.48M                   48   ATB    2.8 mm   1.8 mm   0.5 mm    For crosscuts on soft hard wood, wood-based panels, one-sided veneered, paper-based laminated
236.190.04M                    4    Z4                      Fiber cement boards: Eternit®, Swisspearl®, Fermacell®, Ivarplank®,

HardiePlank®, HardiePanel®, Corian®, Duroplast®, Formica®


Forrest
Ply Veneer                         70   ATB    2.4 mm               Cross cuts on all types of wood including birch plywood
« Last Edit: January 04, 2017, 07:00 PM by rostyvyg »

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Offline DrD

  • Posts: 416
  • I might not be fast BUT I sure am slow
@rostyvyg

That is a lot of work, THANKS!  Now permit me to display my ignorance: just why are Plate Thickness and Offset important?  Are they additive to the kerf?  Additive from what point of reference or datum?

Thanks, again, I've taken the liberty to ear-mark this page as I need a few replacement blades.
KS12 EB Kapex with Delta Folding Table & FastCap Best Fence; TS75 EQ with Parallel Guide Rail Set (FS-PA 495717 & FS-PA-VL 495718) and FS 800/2, 1080/2, 1400/2 LR32, 1400/2, 1900/2 Guide Rails, and Betterly SLC23 Straight Line Connector; DF500 Q with Assortment Systainer; OF1010 EQ with Fine Adjuster for Guide Stop, WA-OF Angle Arm, UP-OF Edging Plate and SF-OF Chip Deflector (486242); OF1400 EQ with OF1400 Dust Hood x 2, OF 1400  Edge Guide x 2, OF 1400  Guide Stop; LR32 Set; PSB399 EQ; EHL65 E; RAS115.04 E; RS2 E; ETS150/3 EQ; RO150 FEQ; Hand Sanding Block Set; CT26 with assortment of AS and Non-AS Hoses; MFT/3 Table x2; SysLite; Assortment of Quick & Screw Clamps, Consumables, Dogs.

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 975
Thank you for posting this and taking the time for doing all that.  I've printed it and it will sit in my TS75 Systainer for future reference.
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline rostyvyg

  • Posts: 11
@rostyvyg

 Now permit me to display my ignorance: just why are Plate Thickness and Offset important?  Are they additive to the kerf?  Additive from what point of reference or datum?


Well, in order to determine how far the blade will cut into the guide rail splinter guard one must calculate where the inner side of the kerf resides in relation to the inner arbor plate. Given the same kerf a thicker blade plate would move the inner kerf side outward. A thinner blade plate will move the inner side of the kerf inward - towards the guide rail. This is where offset comes into play. It is calculated as (kerf - plate thickness) / 2. Offset larger then offset of the OEM Festool blade will cause the new blade to cut into the splinter guard. So far by calculations and by real life observations I can attest that Amana (A.G.E.) blades are exact match to Festool OEM counterparts.  With other blades you have to look at the table. For example, a general purpose (36T) CMT blade will cut 0.25 mm into the splinter guard. This is something you could notice with a naked eye. A general purpose Tenryu wil cut 0.05 mm into the splinter guard - this is something I, personally would not be able to detect just by looking.

I would be very interested if anyone in possession of Oshlun blades for TS75 measured kerf and plate thickness and posted those measurments here so that I could expand the table...

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8142
Now permit me to display my ignorance: just why are Plate Thickness and Offset important? 

The thickness of the kerf minus the plate thickness divided by 2 = tooth offset or tooth overhang. That's how much the teeth over hang the plate on each side. That determines how much you cut or don't cut into the splinter strip when you swap between blades.

The TS 55 doesn't have these issues if you stay with Festool blades because they all have the same kerf width. I always thought it was strange that Festool didn't take this same approach with the TS 75.

Offline DrD

  • Posts: 416
  • I might not be fast BUT I sure am slow
Thanks guys for the easy to understand explanation.  As for why Festool neglected to do for the TS 75 what they did for the TS 55, I posted about my frustrations about this fact the other day where someone was asking why the depth of plunge guide on the TS 75 did not account for the guide rail.
KS12 EB Kapex with Delta Folding Table & FastCap Best Fence; TS75 EQ with Parallel Guide Rail Set (FS-PA 495717 & FS-PA-VL 495718) and FS 800/2, 1080/2, 1400/2 LR32, 1400/2, 1900/2 Guide Rails, and Betterly SLC23 Straight Line Connector; DF500 Q with Assortment Systainer; OF1010 EQ with Fine Adjuster for Guide Stop, WA-OF Angle Arm, UP-OF Edging Plate and SF-OF Chip Deflector (486242); OF1400 EQ with OF1400 Dust Hood x 2, OF 1400  Edge Guide x 2, OF 1400  Guide Stop; LR32 Set; PSB399 EQ; EHL65 E; RAS115.04 E; RS2 E; ETS150/3 EQ; RO150 FEQ; Hand Sanding Block Set; CT26 with assortment of AS and Non-AS Hoses; MFT/3 Table x2; SysLite; Assortment of Quick & Screw Clamps, Consumables, Dogs.

Offline rostyvyg

  • Posts: 11
Would yiu, kindly, measure the  blade plate thickness of your Oshlun blades ad post them in this thread?

Offline Richard A.

  • Posts: 50
Would it be possible to shim the blade over on the blades with the thinner blade plates as to not change the cut edge? Or would that be dangerous?
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Offline Svar

  • Posts: 2334
Would it be possible to shim the blade over on the blades with the thinner blade plates as to not change the cut edge? Or would that be dangerous?
You could do that. There is a variety of arbor shims available for table saws.
You can also shim the guide rail channel in the saw base with thin UHMW tape, then readjus green knobs. This will move the entire saw away from the splinter guard. Its even easier on TS 55 REQ, as you can stick a shim under black plastic slides.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2017, 11:29 PM by Svar »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8142
Excluding CMT and excluding all the steel rated blades, the offset difference at the splinter guard between other brands and within brands looks to be 0.10mm (0.004") at most.

Agreed...while this is an interesting discussion and it is certainly capable of generating some interest, the net outcome is really insignificant. A gap of .004" as it relates to woodworking is the equivalent to the thickness of a coarse hair or a piece of paper. Seasonal changes or humidity variations will cause variations larger than that.

A .004" variance is large when machining metals and is huge when designing tools/dies/molds...but not so much when it comes to wood and even less when working with plastics.

Offline rostyvyg

  • Posts: 11
Thanks. I updated the original post with your data.

Offline Poindexter

  • Posts: 144
Fantastic thread   [thanks]

Offline presidentsdad

  • Posts: 67
Re: Aftermarket Blades for TS75 (List of Part Numbers with Specifications)
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2020, 03:51 PM »
Would it be possible to shim the blade over on the blades with the thinner blade plates as to not change the cut edge? Or would that be dangerous?
You could do that. There is a variety of arbor shims available for table saws.
You can also shim the guide rail channel in the saw base with thin UHMW tape, then readjus green knobs. This will move the entire saw away from the splinter guard. Its even easier on TS 55 REQ, as you can stick a shim under black plastic slides.

Hey all,
I hate to revive an old thread, but it was exactly what I needed.  For a TS75, regarding blade shims to "push out" the blade from the arbor to compensate for the differing kerf between the standard 36 tooth (2.4mm kerf) and the panther 16 tooth blade (2.6mm kerf), would I need 1/2 the kerf difference so that it puts the cut line exactly where the thinner blade starts?  In other words, to switch from the 2.4mm kerf blade to the 2.6mm kerf blade and still use the same guide rail/splinterguard, I'd need to find a .1mm shim and put it on before I put the blade in so that it pushes the blade out by 1/2 the kerf thickness?  Is that correct??  Thanks in advance.
PresidentsDad - TS75; FS1900; FS1400 LR32; CT36; RO150; DF700 XL; Seneca Small Mortise Kit;

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5017
Re: Aftermarket Blades for TS75 (List of Part Numbers with Specifications)
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2020, 05:59 PM »
Nothing wrong with reviving an old thread, especially if it has good information.

You are right in principle, a .1mm shim will push the wider kerf blade out to cut the same distance from the rail as the .2mm narrower blade.

In practice, you’ll need to shim the Panther blade out much farther (depends on the behavior of that particular blade) or suffer a severely chewed up splinter guard. The actual kerf of my Panther blades can double in use, for no discernible reason, resulting in a wavy cut that needs to be re-cut with a more civilized blade or jointed, unless the use is rough carpentry. The Universal blade cuts much more consistently.


Offline presidentsdad

  • Posts: 67
Re: Aftermarket Blades for TS75 (List of Part Numbers with Specifications)
« Reply #14 on: September 02, 2020, 08:23 AM »
So should I rip with the grain using the universal blade instead of the panther ripping blade?  I thought the point of switching to the ripping blade (panther, less teeth larger gullets, suited for work with the grain) was cleaner/faster rips?
PresidentsDad - TS75; FS1900; FS1400 LR32; CT36; RO150; DF700 XL; Seneca Small Mortise Kit;

Offline presidentsdad

  • Posts: 67
Re: Aftermarket Blades for TS75 (List of Part Numbers with Specifications)
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2020, 09:23 AM »
Alright, did some research on Panther vs "standard" blade.  Seems the 18 tooth standard blade is better for ripping than the universal 36 tooth blade, but a leaves a smoother cut than the panther blade.  So...my question still remains, can I use a .1mm shim to compensate for the extra .2mm kerf of the 18 tooth standard blade over the 2.4mm kerf 36 tooth universal blade?  Would that still give me a good rip cut and not eat up my guide rail splinter guard?
PresidentsDad - TS75; FS1900; FS1400 LR32; CT36; RO150; DF700 XL; Seneca Small Mortise Kit;

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 205
Re: Aftermarket Blades for TS75 (List of Part Numbers with Specifications)
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2020, 10:44 AM »
Now I'm questioning my decision to buy the Panther blade for my TS75.  I have some 52mm thick beech to rip, and was hoping the Panther would give me a smooth edge.  It's still unopened, so I can easily exchange it for the standard 18-tooth blade, but I am interested in a source for shims so I don't have to keep two sets of rails or change out the edge strips when I change blades.

Offline presidentsdad

  • Posts: 67
Re: Aftermarket Blades for TS75 (List of Part Numbers with Specifications)
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2020, 10:54 AM »
I was going to buy some from McMaster-Carr. They call them "round shims," but there is a .1mm with a 30mm ID hole.
PresidentsDad - TS75; FS1900; FS1400 LR32; CT36; RO150; DF700 XL; Seneca Small Mortise Kit;

Offline presidentsdad

  • Posts: 67
Alright, did some research on Panther vs "standard" blade.  Seems the 18 tooth standard blade is better for ripping than the universal 36 tooth blade, but a leaves a smoother cut than the panther blade.  So...my question still remains, can I use a .1mm shim to compensate for the extra .2mm kerf of the 18 tooth standard blade over the 2.4mm kerf 36 tooth universal blade?  Would that still give me a good rip cut and not eat up my guide rail splinter guard?

Does anyone have some advise on this question??
PresidentsDad - TS75; FS1900; FS1400 LR32; CT36; RO150; DF700 XL; Seneca Small Mortise Kit;

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 830
I’ve searched for alternatives, as 210mm and the Festool name is rare here.. as one could easily drown in choices in “160mm” blades.

I found these from Makita as well, I know others are saying very good thing about them.
There’s a 24 tooth general and a 40 tooth fine. Both seem to be the same tooth “M”, just different tooth count. It seems that these are ww available.


« Last Edit: October 02, 2020, 03:57 PM by FestitaMakool »
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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 8142
It's been my experience that each blade manufacturer, in this case Leitz, tend to use the same amount of carbide overhang when manufacturing saw blades of different kerf widths. So the thickness of the blade plate changes, which then changes the kerf thickness but not the amount of carbide overhang.

Thus, there is no need to use spacers if you stick with the same blade manufacturer.

Pretty easy to check...measure each blade kerf thickness and subtract the blade plate thickness and divide by 2. That's the amount of carbide overhang on each blade. If the overhang is the same there's no need to shim the blade.

For Forrest blades carbide overhang is .009", Mafell blades run .010" and Leitz runs .012".

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 2334
It's been my experience that each blade manufacturer, in this case Leitz, tend to use the same amount of carbide overhang when manufacturing saw blades of different kerf widths. So the thickness of the blade plate changes, which then changes the kerf thickness but not the amount of carbide overhang.
Thus, there is no need to use spacers if you stick with the same blade manufacturer.
Pretty easy to check...measure each blade kerf thickness and subtract the blade plate thickness and divide by 2. That's the amount of carbide overhang on each blade. If the overhang is the same there's no need to shim the blade.
For Forrest blades carbide overhang is .009", Mafell blades run .010" and Leitz runs .012".
I second that. I'll only add that this variation is so small it can be ignored. In the example above switching from Forrest to Leitz will cut 0.08 mm (0.003") into your strip  - absolutely inconsequential, something you won't even notice.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2020, 04:39 PM by Svar »

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 764
For my TS55 I kinda came to AKE Blueline sawblades by accident; they are excellent I find in my (limited) experience. I did some research and found that AKE also own the CMS Orange brand. In the combined Blueline & CMT catalogue I found 9 blades that are compatible with the TS75 (some are even singled out with a "Festool" mention) on page 28 (26):
https://ake.de/flip-pdf/de/AKE%20Blueline%20CMT/mobile/index.html

Hope this helps.


Addendum: the Dutch rep for AKE has a nice overview of all compatible blades (in Dutch, but still…):
https://trasco.nl/zaagbladen_D_210_30.php
« Last Edit: October 03, 2020, 09:13 AM by Bert Vanderveen »
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Offline presidentsdad

  • Posts: 67
It's been my experience that each blade manufacturer, in this case Leitz, tend to use the same amount of carbide overhang when manufacturing saw blades of different kerf widths. So the thickness of the blade plate changes, which then changes the kerf thickness but not the amount of carbide overhang.
Thus, there is no need to use spacers if you stick with the same blade manufacturer.
Pretty easy to check...measure each blade kerf thickness and subtract the blade plate thickness and divide by 2. That's the amount of carbide overhang on each blade. If the overhang is the same there's no need to shim the blade.
For Forrest blades carbide overhang is .009", Mafell blades run .010" and Leitz runs .012".

I second that. I'll only add that this variation is so small it can be ignored. In the example above switching from Forrest to Leitz will cut 0.08 mm (0.003") into your strip  - absolutely inconsequential, something you won't even notice.

Would probably stay with Festool blades.  Wondering if there is that much difference between the 36 tooth blade and the 18 tooth blade kerf/cut wise.  Anyone have any experience with this?
PresidentsDad - TS75; FS1900; FS1400 LR32; CT36; RO150; DF700 XL; Seneca Small Mortise Kit;