Author Topic: Trion PS 300 EQ  (Read 7546 times)

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Offline Good77696e

  • Posts: 16
Trion PS 300 EQ
« on: October 20, 2012, 04:58 PM »
I was trying to upgrade my dewalt jigsaw. After reading all the reviews I decided on a bosch JS470EB. I found it to be just the most horrible saw ever! It heated up so much after just a short use that it was hard to hold on to and the blade wander was amazing. It was all over the place, very hard to control. I thought at first it was just me, after reading so many good reviews, but no matter how hard I tried I could bot get that saw to cut straight.

I ended up taking it back and getting the saw that also came up so often. The festool... It was a little more money, but wow, what a difference. I have only two complaints. One, which people often mention, it's hard to see the cut line. The other complaint is that I like it so much it makes me want to purchase other festool products, and that could add up to a lot of money in a hurry.

I've since managed to find a second hand ct 33 vacumn that I bought. I've hooked it up to the jigsaw and found that the dust collection doesn't seem to be as good as what people are saying. Any dust that comes out the top of the work piece is collected, but there is still quite a bit that falls on to the floor. I can't see any way around this. So now I'm wondering if the router would be the same way? I was thinking of investing in a 2200 router. I'm cutting out pieces using a template with a spiral up bit. I suppose the first few passes it would collect quite a bit, but then once it cuts through I would think there would be quite a bit that falls below. Anyone have experience with this? They were telling me at the dealer that I could cut right through the 3/4" plywood in one pass, has anyone on here tried that? I'm sure I could too with the router I'm using, but I don't think it's meant to work that hard.

I'm using an old Makita 3612BR that works just fine, I was thinking of getting the dust extraction piece to attach and see if works OK.


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Offline ccarrolladams

  • Posts: 1466
Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2012, 05:28 PM »
 [welcome] to The FOG, Good!

I have been using a Festool Trion PS 300 for a lot of years and I like it a whole lot.

Just remember, dust collection with a hand-held jig saw will never be as efficient as with saws cutting sheet material on a sacrificial surface. When a TS55 just nicks the sacrificial surface 3-6mm, all the dust is extracted. Use the TS55 without a sacrificial surface and much of the dust falls down and is not extracted.

The same is true when cutting out pieces using a router. Firsts of all the router works best when the material being cut is supported by a sacrificial surface, There is no reason why an up-cut spiral bit needs to nick the sacrificial surface more than 6mm. Now an OF1010 or OF2200 router will collect virtually all the dust and chips.

As for seeing the line using a Trion PS 300, for me this is no problem because from my first jig saw in 1946 I have used them under the work being cut. There will be a little dust on top, but with the Trion most is collected. The remainder on top I just brush away if I start to lose sight of the line.

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3323
Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2012, 06:28 PM »
welcome to the fog good.
dc isnt going to be 100% on a jigsaw. most of it is collected thow.

carrol, are you saying that the dc on the of1400 wont be as good as the 1010.
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline ccarrolladams

  • Posts: 1466
Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2012, 09:05 PM »
welcome to the fog good.
dc isnt going to be 100% on a jigsaw. most of it is collected thow.

carrol, are you saying that the dc on the of1400 wont be as good as the 1010.

Alan, I answered about the OF2200 because that was information the OP requested.

Yes, when it came to the USA I bought an OF1400, but by then I already owned several OF1010 and two OF2200. Therefore relative to most of the other Festool products I own, my experience with the OF1400 router is limited. What I do know is that in training classes we managed to collect most of the 1400 dust. The tasks I routine perform with OF1010s and the OF2200s by their nature make dust collection easier than the projects we did in class with the OF1400. In my normal workflow the OF1400 tasks from class I would perform in different ways.

A major reason I participate in Festool and other classes is to expand my experience so I can find new ways to perform routine tasks. Of course I also discover that the methods I have perfected over the years suit me best.

My impression is the OF1400 is a marvelous router. Certainly if I could only own a single router the OF1400 would be the top of my list.

As for dust collection with the OF1400, effectiveness is a matter of technique.

In woodworking dust collection is important. But, bottom line is the task must be performed in such a way the finished project is better than good enough for the purpose. Sometimes this means we decide to use a technique which produces the best product at the expense of cleaning up slightly more dust at the end of the shift.

Offline Julian Tracy

  • Posts: 529
    • Renovation By Design, Inc.
Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2012, 10:02 PM »
The Bosch to have is the 1590/91 series.

Their new models, the JXXXX numbered ones they recently introduced are a step back in features and probably in quality.

The 1590/91 have the lower blade guides like the Festool, but imo are nicer as they self-adjust to the blade thickness.  The Festool guides have to be adjusted with each of two allen screws on either side of the blade every time you change to a different thickness blade - I found that to be a pain.

As far as dust collection, I've found the Bosch to be quite similar in that effect, and just like the Festool, screws up your line of sight of the blade.

I've had two Trion's and sold them both now that I have the D-handled Bosch.  At the older high price of the Trions and the lower price of the Bosch, there was no contest.  Now that the Trion's have a lower price and the Bosch has actually moved to a higher price point, either one is probably a good bet.

But I do prefer the auto-adjusting blade guides of the Bosch.

JT

Offline Good77696e

  • Posts: 16
Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2012, 07:16 AM »
[welcome] to The FOG, Good!

I have been using a Festool Trion PS 300 for a lot of years and I like it a whole lot.

Just remember, dust collection with a hand-held jig saw will never be as efficient as with saws cutting sheet material on a sacrificial surface. When a TS55 just nicks the sacrificial surface 3-6mm, all the dust is extracted. Use the TS55 without a sacrificial surface and much of the dust falls down and is not extracted.

The same is true when cutting out pieces using a router. Firsts of all the router works best when the material being cut is supported by a sacrificial surface, There is no reason why an up-cut spiral bit needs to nick the sacrificial surface more than 6mm. Now an OF1010 or OF2200 router will collect virtually all the dust and chips.

As for seeing the line using a Trion PS 300, for me this is no problem because from my first jig saw in 1946 I have used them under the work being cut. There will be a little dust on top, but with the Trion most is collected. The remainder on top I just brush away if I start to lose sight of the line.

 [thanks] ccarolladams.

I was at the dealer yesterday, I was trying to get vacumn bags for the used ct33 that I picked up. I noticed they had a lot of marks on their MFT. Do you think that is common practice, to use your actual bench as a sacrifical surface?

Offline joiner1970

  • Posts: 3222
Re: Re: Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2012, 08:20 AM »


I was at the dealer yesterday, I was trying to get vacumn bags for the used ct33 that I picked up. I noticed they had a lot of marks on their MFT. Do you think that is common practice, to use your actual bench as a sacrifical surface?

That's exactly what it is a sacrificial surface, that's the whole idea of it . It designed to be cut into.

Offline GregBradley

  • Posts: 192
Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2012, 05:01 PM »
The Bosch to have is the 1590/91 series.

Their new models, the JXXXX numbered ones they recently introduced are a step back in features and probably in quality.

The 1590/91 have the lower blade guides like the Festool, but imo are nicer as they self-adjust to the blade thickness.  The Festool guides have to be adjusted with each of two allen screws on either side of the blade every time you change to a different thickness blade - I found that to be a pain.

As far as dust collection, I've found the Bosch to be quite similar in that effect, and just like the Festool, screws up your line of sight of the blade.

I've had two Trion's and sold them both now that I have the D-handled Bosch.  At the older high price of the Trions and the lower price of the Bosch, there was no contest.  Now that the Trion's have a lower price and the Bosch has actually moved to a higher price point, either one is probably a good bet.

But I do prefer the auto-adjusting blade guides of the Bosch.

JT
I would agree with this 100%.

I have several Bosch 1590/1591 in a shop and personally have a Bosch 1590 and Festool Trion 300. They are very similar units and NOTHING like the consumer Bosch JS470, etc. that supposedly replace the 1590/1591. The BORGs can claim these are a replacement and sell these to people that don't know the difference.

The 1590/1591 just became the professional unit and is packaged with dust collection and a Sortimo Systainer. This brings the cost up to around $200 or so just a bit less than the reduced Trion series.

I like the Bosch lower blade clamp better than the Festool. I have a mild preference for the Trion on fine work and the Bosch 1590 for heavier work. They are both great tools. They both use the same style blades.

It seems Bosch now finally came out with the REAL replacement for the 1590/1591 in the JS572. These are supposedly $300-350. Lately suppliers are trying to get $260 or so for the remaining 1590/1591 series in the kit, which are noted by "EVSL" following the 1590 or 1591.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 05:10 PM by GregBradley »

Online ScotF

  • Posts: 2866
Re: Trion PS 300 EQ
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2012, 05:16 PM »
The Bosch to have is the 1590/91 series.

Their new models, the JXXXX numbered ones they recently introduced are a step back in features and probably in quality.

The 1590/91 have the lower blade guides like the Festool, but imo are nicer as they self-adjust to the blade thickness.  The Festool guides have to be adjusted with each of two allen screws on either side of the blade every time you change to a different thickness blade - I found that to be a pain.

As far as dust collection, I've found the Bosch to be quite similar in that effect, and just like the Festool, screws up your line of sight of the blade.

I've had two Trion's and sold them both now that I have the D-handled Bosch.  At the older high price of the Trions and the lower price of the Bosch, there was no contest.  Now that the Trion's have a lower price and the Bosch has actually moved to a higher price point, either one is probably a good bet.

But I do prefer the auto-adjusting blade guides of the Bosch.

JT
I would agree with this 100%.

I have several Bosch 1590/1591 in a shop and personally have a Bosch 1590 and Festool Trion 300. They are very similar units and NOTHING like the consumer Bosch JS470, etc. that supposedly replace the 1590/1591. The BORGs can claim these are a replacement and sell these to people that don't know the difference.

The 1590/1591 just became the professional unit and is packaged with dust collection and a Sortimo Systainer. This brings the cost up to around $200 or so just a bit less than the reduced Trion series.

I like the Bosch lower blade clamp better than the Festool. I have a mild preference for the Trion on fine work and the Bosch 1590 for heavier work. They are both great tools. They both use the same style blades.

It seems Bosch now finally came out with the REAL replacement for the 1590/1591 in the JS572. These are supposedly $300-350. Lately suppliers are trying to get $260 or so for the remaining 1590/1591 series in the kit, which are noted by "EVSL" following the 1590 or 1591.

It does not seem like anyone has the 1590/1591 series any longer, or at least anywhere I have been looking.  The JS470 got an upgrade to power, but lost a lot of the things that the 1590 series used to have.   

Scot