Author Topic: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone  (Read 30209 times)

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Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2012, 11:17 AM »
Rob,  Yes I purchased the Platin from 500 - 4000.  I will start out on some left over material and see how it goes.  Thanks for your advise.

Jack

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Offline NorfolkNgood

  • Posts: 30
Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #31 on: April 29, 2012, 02:11 PM »
Hi
Travertine is extremely soft natural stone and in my experience nearly any aluminium oxide paper will buff/shape it ! Any stone mason will tell you to use silicon carbide paper which is much tougher.also the shaped/sanded edge must be re sealed  as well!
  Gav.
"Rules are for the interpretation of wise men and obedience of fools"

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #32 on: April 29, 2012, 03:11 PM »
Hi
Travertine is extremely soft natural stone and in my experience nearly any aluminium oxide paper will buff/shape it ! Any stone mason will tell you to use silicon carbide paper which is much tougher.also the shaped/sanded edge must be re sealed  as well!
  Gav.

Thanks for the input Gav.

Jack

Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #33 on: June 15, 2012, 11:00 PM »
I bought the RO 90 for sanding hardwood in furniture building but, this stone polishing has me interested.  I have a green/black marble fireplace surround facing that's getting dull after 30 years and was wondering what I would need to get the shine back?

Tom, do you have any recommendations?   

Hello I just was referred to this forum by Festool as I live 20 min away from their Indianapolis office which is one of the many reasons I've invested into using Festool.  Anyways, I use a rotex 125 with a ct36.  I use my set up for and specialize in stone refinishing, I've done lots of testing trying to figure out different ways to incorporate  Festools.  In regards to your marble fireplace there could be a number of ways to approach it.  Generally walls or vertical surfaces (excluding showers) don't need much.  If you could post a picture I could probably get you going in the rite direction.

Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #34 on: June 16, 2012, 09:27 AM »
Sorry just saw the pictures.  That green marble is actually a serpentine very hard material and difficult to polish if you have never done it before.  The finish that is on there is how that stuff polishes up all stone polishes differently the only way you may get more shine out of it is by using polishing compounds.  Serpentine polishes similiar to both calcite and silica based stones:  Calcite stones would be marble limestone and Travertine.  Silica based stone would be granite in which you need to put the festool paper away and go to diamonds.  Serpentine "green marble" has attributes of both types of stone (calcite and silica) so polishing it can get tricky.  Leave it thats the way it is supposed to look.

In regards to the travertine use a sanding block and do it by hand start with like a 120 grit maybe and 80 grit if you can't get the scratches out take it up to like 1200
80 120 220 400 800 1200.  Tape off the finished area to prevent an opps.  Throw a little auto motive wax or color enhancer on edge if the color isnt rite.  Don't get carried away if you us color enhancer you can get yourself in trouble.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2012, 09:30 AM by Absolute Stone Polishing »

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #35 on: June 18, 2012, 08:30 PM »
Sorry just saw the pictures.  That green marble is actually a serpentine very hard material and difficult to polish if you have never done it before.  The finish that is on there is how that stuff polishes up all stone polishes differently the only way you may get more shine out of it is by using polishing compounds.  Serpentine polishes similiar to both calcite and silica based stones:  Calcite stones would be marble limestone and Travertine.  Silica based stone would be granite in which you need to put the festool paper away and go to diamonds.  Serpentine "green marble" has attributes of both types of stone (calcite and silica) so polishing it can get tricky.  Leave it thats the way it is supposed to look.

In regards to the travertine use a sanding block and do it by hand start with like a 120 grit maybe and 80 grit if you can't get the scratches out take it up to like 1200
80 120 220 400 800 1200.  Tape off the finished area to prevent an opps.  Throw a little auto motive wax or color enhancer on edge if the color isnt rite.  Don't get carried away if you us color enhancer you can get yourself in trouble.



Thanks for the information but, my original question is how to restore the bright polished finish that has dulled over 30 years?  Perhaps it's too tricky for an amateur to tackle and I'll just leave it as is.

The Travertine doesn't bother us as much as other projects in the house so, It's a future project but, thanks for the suggestion.

Jack

Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #36 on: June 19, 2012, 07:29 AM »
Sorry just saw the pictures.  That green marble is actually a serpentine very hard material and difficult to polish if you have never done it before.  The finish that is on there is how that stuff polishes up all stone polishes differently the only way you may get more shine out of it is by using polishing compounds.  Serpentine polishes similiar to both calcite and silica based stones:  Calcite stones would be marble limestone and Travertine.  Silica based stone would be granite in which you need to put the festool paper away and go to diamonds.  Serpentine "green marble" has attributes of both types of stone (calcite and silica) so polishing it can get tricky.  Leave it thats the way it is supposed to look.

In regards to the travertine use a sanding block and do it by hand start with like a 120 grit maybe and 80 grit if you can't get the scratches out take it up to like 1200
80 120 220 400 800 1200.  Tape off the finished area to prevent an opps.  Throw a little auto motive wax or color enhancer on edge if the color isnt rite.  Don't get carried away if you us color enhancer you can get yourself in trouble.



Thanks for the information but, my original question is how to restore the bright polished finish that has dulled over 30 years?  Perhaps it's too tricky for an amateur to tackle and I'll just leave it as is.

The Travertine doesn't bother us as much as other projects in the house so, It's a future project but, thanks for the suggestion.

Jack

Jack that is the shiney finish, the only part of that fireplace that would need any work done is the hearth.  Most fireplaces don't get used much, scratches and etching are the only thing that will dull the finish for the most part.  Polishing stone is a perminate thing.   Serpentine "green marble" doesn't shine to a real high gloss like marble, and is very difficult to polish.  I can explain the process but start with the travertine its more forgiving.  Long story short don't touch it, it looks good from the picture I saw.

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #37 on: June 19, 2012, 05:17 PM »
Thanks for the advise, I'd hate to make things worst by bumbling along in the dark.  One person suggested that I just buff it out with a paste wax or leave it as is.

Jack

Offline B_Swanson

  • Posts: 46
Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #38 on: June 19, 2012, 06:16 PM »
Any suggestions on a progression of abrasives to buff out a scratch and return the sheen to a soapstone countertop?  Thanks in advance.

Brad

Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #39 on: June 19, 2012, 07:04 PM »
Thanks for the advise, I'd hate to make things worst by bumbling along in the dark.  One person suggested that I just buff it out with a paste wax or leave it as is.

Jack

Clean it up with some denatured alcohol use a razor to scrape up anything that is stuck to it, throw some turtle wax on there, buff it with a microfiber and call it done.   [cool]

Re: Rotex 90 for shaping, honing and polishing stone
« Reply #40 on: June 19, 2012, 07:19 PM »
Any suggestions on a progression of abrasives to buff out a scratch and return the sheen to a soapstone countertop?  Thanks in advance.

Brad

I'd have to see a picture, but most soapstone is at around a 220 grit honed finish, then finished off with either linseed oil or mineral oil.   Yes mineral oil the laxitive you can get at any store.  Most people use mineral oil, I'm particial to linseed but if it has a bit a sheen its probably mineral oil.  Soapstone is really forgiving and soft, mostly made up of talc.  Very dense and heavy, but is a 1 on the mohs hardness scale.  Which means anything will scratch it.  Sometimes the scratches can be removed by simply0wiping it with a medium grit steelwool.  If you didn't want to deal with it just oil it and walkaway.  Otherwise throw a 220 on an orbital machine and work it till everything is evened out and reoil tops, again I need to see a picture.  If you use water it will have a moisturizing effect on your hands.  Soapstone is one of my favorite materials.