Author Topic: Domino 500 vs 700  (Read 21378 times)

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Offline ChuckS

  • Posts: 4283
Re: Domino 500 vs 700
« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2022, 02:31 PM »
Snip.

With a 700 you can do big or little projects, with a 500 you are limited to little ones.   

By "big" I suppose you mean entrance doors, outdoor benches for a party of 10 or more, and balconies, and "little" anything else.

Yes, single tenon joinery made with the DF500 may not be strong enough for certain structural elements, but it's more than fine for typical cabinets and furniture that most woodworkers build. Let's not forget that before the DF700 came to the market, woodworkers had been and are still building tables, chairs, beds, ladders and whatnot with its smaller cousin.

Something not every DF500 owner is aware of or tries is the double, twin, and double/twin joints which are very strong. Elsewhere in this Forum, I've shared them. My dining table for 8, breakfast table, credenza (its contents are books and magazines - some 400 of them?), set of 6 dining chairs, etc. are all in good shape after 1 to 5 years of use, and they were all built with the DF500.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2022, 02:38 PM by ChuckS »

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Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 2377
Re: Domino 500 vs 700
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2022, 06:26 AM »
Yes, double-double joints are very strong. These stretched A-frame table legs were some of the first project parts I made with my DF500. They have wheels and quite heavy solid surface tops which makes the strength requirement even higher. Four 10 x 50 did the job and they have been living in a classroom for over 6 years now.
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Offline gxgn

  • Posts: 31
    • my other hobby
Re: Domino 500 vs 700
« Reply #32 on: January 24, 2022, 09:54 PM »
I had this debate years ago and I ended up getting the 700 plus the Seneca adapters for 5 and 6mm. I found myself using only 5, 6 and 8mm cutters so now my 700 is for sale (or trade locally).
I think the idea that the 700 can do everything that the 500 can do and much more is true but it’s heavy and I think I would prefer the lighter 500. Time will tell, maybe after I switch to 500 I decide to go back or worse, get both of them. So it’s life in the conquest for the perfect tool lineup. Now I’m tempted to try the Lamello Zeta P2 plus the 500 if budget will allow, probably totally overkill for small house projects I do.

Offline smorgasbord

  • Posts: 206
Re: Domino 500 vs 700
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2022, 12:05 AM »
I had this debate years ago and I ended up getting the 700 plus the Seneca adapters for 5 and 6mm. I found myself using only 5, 6 and 8mm cutters so now my 700 is for sale (or trade locally). ... Now I’m tempted to try the Lamello Zeta P2 plus the 500 if budget will allow, probably totally overkill for small house projects I do.

I would think the 700 plus the Zeta is the perfect combination.

I personally wanted the domino as a replacement for true mortise and tenon joinery. I thought about tenon length, and since I had made tenons/mortises longer/deeper than the 500's 25mm/1" length often enough, I also went for the 700.

Any biscuit joiner will do for normal biscuits, but the Zeta's ability to cut grooves inside the mortise enables knockdown connectors that are less visible than the DF500's connectors for 4/4 stock or thinner. And if you need strength, the 700's connectors can handle things like bed frames in thicker stock.

Of course, if you're primarily doing things like picture frames or face frames, I could see where the 500 makes more sense.