Author Topic: KF 5  (Read 5048 times)

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Offline richard.selwyn

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KF 5
« on: October 15, 2012, 01:07 PM »
Don't expect many of you have heard of it. It's a modified 1010 router specially for windows. I bought it about 5 years ago but rarely get it out. Just spent all day using it today to modify old oak windows to accept double glazing and wanted to say that it is a good example of Festool at their best. After my Carvex 400 I had lost some of my enthusiasm ( although as they replaced it for a 420 I was already on the mend  ;)) but this reminded me just why I have over 30 systainers full of Festools in the shop.
Thank you Festool, with the KF 5 and a Fein Supercut I hardly had to get out a chisel.
Richard.

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Offline SRSemenza

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  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: KF 5
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2012, 08:02 PM »
Richard,


How about some pics and usage details?

Seth

Offline richard.selwyn

  • Posts: 635
Re: KF 5
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2012, 07:57 AM »
Pics may require too much effort [big grin]
It works just like the 1010 but the bit has a shank whick includes the collet so to speak, making it bigger and stronger. There's also a metal guard to protect against flying debris.
I generally try to remove all glass, putty and nails - not always successful on the latter, but the machine will eat the putty, bits of glass etc. I then use the machine freehand to increase the depth of the rebate for the glass to allow a 14 mm double glazed panel to finish flush with the frame. This is then fixed in with silicone and the edges between the glass and the frame covered with wood strips - usually chestnut.
It's a lot of work and the result will never be as thermally efficient as a new unit, but some of the old french windows have really attractive 'cremones' - the closing mechanism - which I generally sandblast and clear varnish or paint and none of the new windows have the charm of the old ones. The biggest shame is losing the old glass though which is full of distortions etc and really cool.
Can't imagine Festool bothering to ship it to the US tho.
R

Offline Nigel

  • Posts: 641
Re: KF 5
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2012, 12:15 PM »
I love those old windows. They are invariably Oak as well. Saw one on the skip the other day complete with cremone. The window was knackered but the cremone went in the back  of the van.

It's an interesting concept to modify those old windows Richard. Can you do some pics? I have some clients with a big house full of them who keep talking about what they might do to renovate or change theirs. They don't like the look of the modern windows at all but have been informed that the old ones won't take the weight of double glazed units.

Do you actually add to the thickness of the frame?

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 7246
Re: KF 5
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2012, 12:33 PM »
What happens if the KF5 hits a nail? Does it just go through it or do you have to remove them all before?

Offline richard.selwyn

  • Posts: 635
Re: KF 5
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2012, 02:51 PM »
Nigel,
I'll try to take some pics, but its not my strongest suit.

No the frame itself stays the same, but the strip that goes on to the outside of the window to cover the now flush joint between the frame and the glazing adds 5mm (hope that makes sense) This can cause difficulties with shutters that close directly onto the window, but that is the only case where I've had a problem.

Did Art Nouveau some cremones in Paris that were a sort of Nymph with a very charming "poitrine"! They were covered in thick paint. I sand blasted them then polished them with a wire brush wheel on a grinder, then clear lacquer. They looked gorgeous.

The current job is for someone who had had one new window fitted by someone else but wasn't happy with the look. Renovating works out at about 2/3rds the cost of a new one, but not sure how much they gain in insulation. I also offer a silicon rubber joint around the frame as an option, that I install with a Virutex machine that cuts a special groove around the frame.
I often wonder with modern windows (which I am not equipped to make - about 5000 euros in tooling for the shaper for all the profiles) - they are hugely insulated and sealed, but then they have an air vent in them!   [unsure]
Richard

Offline richard.selwyn

  • Posts: 635
Re: KF 5
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2012, 02:56 PM »
Alex, when it hits a nail there are sparks! Sometimes there's one left in some of e putty that I've been too lazy to remove. The cutter probably doesn't like it, but they are pretty high quality Festool items that seem to last much better than other ones. I have 'eaten' a fair few nails (although obviously they are pretty small) and so far have never actually chipped the bit. The machine came with 2 different ones. One is currently  in for sharpening after doing six pairs of average size window frames.
Richard

Offline Nigel

  • Posts: 641
Re: KF 5
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2012, 01:29 AM »
Nigel,
I'll try to take some pics, but its not my strongest suit.

No the frame itself stays the same, but the strip that goes on to the outside of the window to cover the now flush joint between the frame and the glazing adds 5mm (hope that makes sense) This can cause difficulties with shutters that close directly onto the window, but that is the only case where I've had a problem.

Did Art Nouveau some cremones in Paris that were a sort of Nymph with a very charming "poitrine"! They were covered in thick paint. I sand blasted them then polished them with a wire brush wheel on a grinder, then clear lacquer. They looked gorgeous.

The current job is for someone who had had one new window fitted by someone else but wasn't happy with the look. Renovating works out at about 2/3rds the cost of a new one, but not sure how much they gain in insulation. I also offer a silicon rubber joint around the frame as an option, that I install with a Virutex machine that cuts a special groove around the frame.
I often wonder with modern windows (which I am not equipped to make - about 5000 euros in tooling for the shaper for all the profiles) - they are hugely insulated and sealed, but then they have an air vent in them!   [unsure]
Richard

Thanks Richard.

Makes sense that's what I thought you meant. What do you think about the extra weight. I can't imagine a huge problem with the thin units. Of course the information may have come from someone trying to sell new windows.

I haven't seen any ''poitrine cremones'' unfortunately  [wink].

The modern windows have wider rails and stiles and don't look as elegant as those old ones which are disappearing at an alarming rate  [sad].