Author Topic: 1010 vs 1400  (Read 7792 times)

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Offline Don Corleone

  • Posts: 21
1010 vs 1400
« on: February 28, 2020, 02:28 PM »
I'm looking at getting a Festool router. Currently I have a Bosch Colt, a Dewalt 621 plunger (2 hp) and a Dewalt 616 kit (2.25 hp). My main concern is dust extraction. I do a fair bit of hogging out (ex 3/8 deep by 3-1/2" wide by 2' long). My Dewalt plunger does fine, but the dust extraction is not the best and when hogging, I tend to get sizable chips, which clog the extraction pipe in the router. I see that the 1400 comes with a larger dust port, and I would think that would be advantageous. Any thoughts?

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Kevin C.

  • Posts: 168
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2020, 03:05 PM »
Oneida makes a base that goes on the dewalt 616/618 and works really well when hooked to a dust extractor. It was like 35 bucks on Amazon. Not to sway you from a new router, but if you're just looking for better dust collection, that is an option.

Offline nvalinski

  • Posts: 138
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2020, 03:25 PM »
Second the Oneida option if that's all you need. For the size you describe though, a 1010 should be adequate and have the benefit of being lightweight and easy to maneuver. If you are doing deeper cuts, need to move over a larger area, or just need to use 1/2" bits, then the 1400 starts to make more sense. I get the sense you are looking more at smaller routing jobs where the smaller size would be more beneficial though.

Offline Don Corleone

  • Posts: 21
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2020, 09:49 AM »
Thanks for the advice. I think I'll try the Oneida. However, I'd still like to add a Festool router to my collection, for collection's sake. I'll watch for a special buy.

Offline ElectricFeet

  • Posts: 114
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2020, 10:55 PM »
Peter Parfitt did a good video on the differences:

Offline Don Corleone

  • Posts: 21
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2020, 09:49 AM »
You didn't post a link. Is this the vid you were referring to? One thing I learned form this vid that I didn't realize is that the 1010 only works with 6mm and 8mm collets. Not good, IMO.

« Last Edit: March 08, 2020, 10:00 AM by Don Corleone »

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 441
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2020, 11:03 AM »
This was a great video, thanks for posting it.  I really like the ratcheting feature on the 1400 but its vacuum port seems a little goofy.. I am still leaning towards the 1010 but this video is making me think about about the 1400 instead.  Not sure why the dust port on the 1010 is not circular.  I know the host still fits, just seems weird they designed it that way.

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2861
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2020, 11:10 AM »
The 1010 is my most used router of all of them. If you do not have 1/2 inch bits or need 1/2 inch, then this is one I would recommend - it is perfect for so many hand-held routing tasks and has oodles of accessories to fit, making it very versatile. The 1400 is a great router too, just bigger. It will also fit a wide range of accessories and of course, it takes 1/2 inch bits. You cannot go wrong with either one.

If you eventually want to get two routers, then a 1010 and 2200 is a great combination and would allow you to handle just about any routing task. If you only want one router, then I would steer you to the 1400 only because of the 1/2 bit capability.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8168
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2020, 11:34 AM »
Not sure why the dust port on the 1010 is not circular.  I know the host still fits, just seems weird they designed it that way.

The dust port on a lot of earlier designed Festool tools is oval shaped. OF 1010...RAS 115...RS 2...DX 93.

Remember, if being able to center the template guide relative to the router bit is important for the work you do, only the 1010 allows that to happen. With the 1400 & 2200 you get what you get.  [smile]

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2020, 12:05 PM »
This was a great video, thanks for posting it.  I really like the ratcheting feature on the 1400 but its vacuum port seems a little goofy.. I am still leaning towards the 1010 but this video is making me think about about the 1400 instead.  Not sure why the dust port on the 1010 is not circular.  I know the host still fits, just seems weird they designed it that way.

Hi Rick,

I have been using the OF1010 today - it is brilliant and the 1/4", 6 mm or 8mm collet choices are perfectly okay for your "go to" router. The dust collection of the 1010 is really good and better than that of the 1400 which would have been better with the 2200 style of collection.

There is no big deal about an oval dust port. The hose end fits perfectly well. I suspect it is more about the design allowing space for the hose if you are working on a flat surface.

I have now moved my 1400 to the CMS unit where it really does come into its own. The dust collection is great as in a semi static setup one is not worried about the flimsy plastic port connection. The ratchet is also a boon when bit changing on a router table.

Peter

Offline jobsworth

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Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2020, 12:16 PM »
What Scott F said

Offline ElectricFeet

  • Posts: 114
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2020, 04:11 PM »
You didn't post a link. Is this the vid you were referring to? One thing I learned form this vid that I didn't realize is that the 1010 only works with 6mm and 8mm collets. Not good, IMO.
Yes, it was. Thanks for posting it. I was on my phone and the forum didn’t like some part of it (though it left a blank space for the vid: weird).

I specifically chose the 1010 because I wanted a smaller router that would go up to 8mm. It covers most applications, though 8mm bits are sometimes a bit difficult to source.

There are a few 1/2 inch bits that I covet that won’t go in it (I’m looking at you, Whiteside Ultimate) bit so far nothing I’ve actually needed, as opposed to wanted.

It fits nicely in the CMS, too, so I’m happy.

As ever, it depends on what you need it to do.

P.s. I agree with Peter that the oval dust port is no problem: the standard Festool hose fits perfectly, once you get the knack of how to fit it (hook firmly on one side of the oval and then squash it over to the other side).

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 441
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2020, 12:52 AM »
I think the 1010 is where I am going.  I am not worried about the dust port, just thought it was odd but as mentioned by Peter, the flatness of it may be helpful.  I also am having an issue with bits.  I use my Dewalt compact router a lot and the basic round over, chamfer, top/bottom flush trim bits are the ones I use the most.  Not finding them in the 8mm size so I guess I will continue with the 1/4" shanks.  Probably makes more sense to do that anyway.

Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 401
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2020, 10:22 AM »
I would steer you away from the OF1400 as a general use router.  I find it great for some tasks and horrible for others.  I bought a Bosch kit years ago and it's still my go-to router.  Bosch sells a bunch of dust collection accessories and I've bought them all (pretty sure DeWalt has a bunch also).  Generally I can figure out a setup that works as well for DC as the OF1400.  I haven't used a 1010 and probably won't unless they add 1/2" capability to it.
Jay St. Peter

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 313
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2020, 04:13 PM »
I use my Dewalt compact router a lot and the basic round over, chamfer, top/bottom flush trim bits are the ones I use the most.  Not finding them in the 8mm size so I guess I will continue with the 1/4" shanks.

Do  search on this forum for threads talking about 8mm shank router bits.  There have been many threads about where to buy these bits.  Looking at European websites and ordering from there is one answer.  Google search for 8mm router bits turns up Whiteside, Amana, Freud, CMT all making 8mm shank bits.  Again, you may have to buy them from a European seller and have them shipped to the USA because the US sellers do not carry the 8mm shank bits even though the company they represent does make them.

Offline Cypren

  • Posts: 51
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #15 on: March 09, 2020, 04:17 PM »
Remember, if being able to center the template guide relative to the router bit is important for the work you do, only the 1010 allows that to happen. With the 1400 & 2200 you get what you get.

Given how many years this has been a known issue with the snap-in baseplates, are there really no third-party solutions to remedy this problem for the larger routers? There's the plexiglass Jasper bushing plate that works with a wide range of the more common router brands; while I know Festool routers are a much lower-volume product, I would have thought someone would have made something similar that bolts onto the 1400 by now, even if it's just a low-volume CNC'd product.

Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 401
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #16 on: March 09, 2020, 05:21 PM »
Remember, if being able to center the template guide relative to the router bit is important for the work you do, only the 1010 allows that to happen. With the 1400 & 2200 you get what you get.

Given how many years this has been a known issue with the snap-in baseplates, are there really no third-party solutions to remedy this problem for the larger routers? There's the plexiglass Jasper bushing plate that works with a wide range of the more common router brands; while I know Festool routers are a much lower-volume product, I would have thought someone would have made something similar that bolts onto the 1400 by now, even if it's just a low-volume CNC'd product.

You just use the Festool adapter for screw in bushings and do what you'd do on any other router.  I haven't really found anything the 1400 can't do.  It's just got a couple significant flaws that prevent me from recommending it.  First, it has terrible balance for edge routing that's made even worse by the snap-in bushing mechanism.  Second, the depth stop turret has false stops that will eventually lead to overplunging if you use it as an incremental plunge mechanism.  I would guess the 1010 is a better router overall.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2020, 05:37 PM by JayStPeter »
Jay St. Peter

Offline xedos

  • Posts: 459
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2020, 05:37 PM »
StPeter - that doesn't do anything to help with the centering on the 1400 if it's out of center from the factory.

Adding a screw in bushing adapter may allow you to use PC style bushes, but they will still be out of center with no way to adjust if the mount is out of center to begin with.

Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 401
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2020, 09:53 AM »
StPeter - that doesn't do anything to help with the centering on the 1400 if it's out of center from the factory.

Adding a screw in bushing adapter may allow you to use PC style bushes, but they will still be out of center with no way to adjust if the mount is out of center to begin with.

My bushings move around on the adapter enough that I can get them centered.  It's not like the thing is off by inches.
Jay St. Peter

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8168
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2020, 11:42 AM »
I use my Dewalt compact router a lot and the basic round over, chamfer, top/bottom flush trim bits are the ones I use the most.  Not finding them in the 8mm size so I guess I will continue with the 1/4" shanks. 

Here are some nice 8 mm bits from Festool USA and all of them have replaceable carbide inserts.

Radius bits;    499811, 499810, 499809 & 499808.
45º chamfer bit;    499807
Flush trim bit with bearing;    491082

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 441
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2020, 12:04 PM »
I use my Dewalt compact router a lot and the basic round over, chamfer, top/bottom flush trim bits are the ones I use the most.  Not finding them in the 8mm size so I guess I will continue with the 1/4" shanks. 

Here are some nice 8 mm bits from Festool USA and all of them have replaceable carbide inserts.

Radius bits;    499811, 499810, 499809 & 499808.
45º chamfer bit;    499807
Flush trim bit with bearing;    491082

Thanks for the numbers Cheese.  They do look nice but just a wee bit out of my price range.

Offline xedos

  • Posts: 459
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2020, 08:29 AM »
@Rick Herrick   Lee Valley has every 8mm shank bit you're ever likely to need.


FWIW - folks have been using 1/4" bits for over 50 years with great success and few issues.  I wouldn't sweat it , especially in a non-production scenario.

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 441
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2020, 08:44 AM »
FWIW - folks have been using 1/4" bits for over 50 years with great success and few issues.  I wouldn't sweat it , especially in a non-production scenario.

Agreed 100%, thank you.  I wasn't thinking it through.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 904
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2020, 08:58 AM »
I'm relatively new to routing and own a few 1/2" bits. But being all in on the Festool train, moving forward I will do my best to plan ahead and order 8mm bits before I need them for all applications that don't require the 1/2" shanks. But like above if it's a smaller bit the 6mm or 1/4" shank shouldn't be an issue.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 441
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2020, 09:29 AM »
Thinking on this a little more.  I am also working towards being all-in on FT but the bits have me puzzled.  I already accept the higher cost on most FT items but still hung up on these 8mm bits.  Most of these are $130-150.  Is there anything more to these bits (over their 1/4" brothers) than just being Festool?  Just looking for that other reason to make me pay the extra over Freud, Whiteside, etc.  Is the carbide better, do they last longer, etc ?  I do realize that being 8mm they are bigger & stronger.

Online Cheese

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Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2020, 10:00 AM »
I already accept the higher cost on most FT items but still hung up on these 8mm bits.  Most of these are $130-150.  Is there anything more to these bits (over their 1/4" brothers) than just being Festool? 

Those bits I mentioned have REPLACEABLE carbide cutters. The cutters can also be rotated 180º so when they dull, you just rotate the cutters and you're good to go again. So double the router bit life expectancy. Further, the cutters themselves are available separately so you can keep some on hand.

If you do a lot of work with MDF these are really handy because the binder used in MDF is tough on the carbide inserts/cutters.

This replaceable insert approach is the path of the future. It started with the metal working industry 40-50 years ago. Every year someone else adds replaceable insert tooling to their product line. Just noticed Amana recently added a bunch of In-Tech™ insert router bits to their product offerings. 

https://www.toolstoday.com/router-bits/in-tech-insert-knive-system-router-bits.html


Offline jeffinsgf

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Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2020, 10:46 AM »
Thinking on this a little more.  I am also working towards being all-in on FT but the bits have me puzzled.  I already accept the higher cost on most FT items but still hung up on these 8mm bits.  Most of these are $130-150.  Is there anything more to these bits (over their 1/4" brothers) than just being Festool?  Just looking for that other reason to make me pay the extra over Freud, Whiteside, etc.  Is the carbide better, do they last longer, etc ?  I do realize that being 8mm they are bigger & stronger.

Rick,
Don't get hung up on your bits being exclusive. The 1010 comes with both 1/4-inch and 8mm collets. You can use whichever you want for whatever you're doing. Like Cheese said, the replaceable insert cutters are fantastic for bits you're using a ton in abrasive materials. The 5mm boring bit is unbelievably clean cutting and fast for boring shelf pins. I have the 5mm bit and a couple dovetail bits from Festool. They're great, but most of the rest of my router bits are Whiteside, with some Amana and Freud in there, too.

Offline Rick Herrick

  • Posts: 441
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #27 on: March 11, 2020, 11:04 AM »
Those bits I mentioned have REPLACEABLE carbide cutters. The cutters can also be rotated 180º so when they dull, you just rotate the cutters and you're good to go again. So double the router bit life expectancy. Further, the cutters themselves are available separately so you can keep some on hand.


Thats very good info.  If I find that there is a certain profile that I use a lot, then one of these with the replaceable cutters could be better over time.  Thanks for pointing that out.

Offline jaykojc

  • Posts: 15
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #28 on: March 31, 2020, 04:34 PM »
I had the 1400, sold it and got a 1010 (for the LR32) and a 2200.  I think my next move is to get rid of the two routers and go back to a 1400.  It has PLENTY of power, is easily manageable, and will do all you can ask of it.  For jobs I'd go to the 1010 for, I'll just use my Makita trim router.

FWIW, I am pretty sure I have a diagnosable problem with buying routers.  I imagine I have 15 now.  The 1400 is the best all around unit; the only thing I don't like is that they don't have (at least that I've seen) a full kit of all the accessories like they have for the 2200.  That's a great setup IMO.

Offline Blues

  • Posts: 92
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2020, 09:17 PM »
+1 for the 1400. Unless you fancy having multiple tools that does the same job 1400 it is. It takes every bit. Has enough power. Tons of accessories. It is one sweet router. If you look at all the compromises you would have if you choose the 1010 or if you choose the 2200, leaves you wanting to be bang in the middle and you will find yourself holding a 1400. Its not the best. But it is the best all round router.

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2861
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2020, 09:24 PM »
They all have their strengths and weaknesses - that is why you might do like me and get one of each!

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline fabricem

  • Posts: 2
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #31 on: August 09, 2020, 09:15 AM »
I will add my two cents to the discussion as this is an issue I just dealt with. I should prime my comments with the fact that I hate routers and don't need to go out to job sites, all my work is done in my studio. I am very comfortable with all my tools, but routers when handheld are scary to me, especially the powerful one. The 1400 was my first festool router and I had it for years, it is very well design, powerful and does well with both 1/4 and 1/2 bits. However, I almost never used it handheld, especially with 1/2 bits ( I do use it on a festool router table), for handheld, I used my Bosch palm router . recently I decided to downsize my tool "collection" and get rid of tools that are either redundant with other tools or tools I don't use much. I sold both my 1400 and palm routers and bought the MFK700 since most of my router needs involve little touch-up such as adding a small bevel or edge trimming. I love the feel of the MFK700 except for a giant design flow, IMO, which is that you can't see the bit, and in my work ( I am an industrial designer and do a lot of prototyping ) I need to see where I am in space and where my bit is. This is the only Festool tool I have sent back in the many years using their tools... So I ended up buying the OF1010. The 1010 is a great compromise, it is easy to use handheld and has plenty of power, not to mention I can still use my router table... I should mention that I also have a full size CNC with a spindle, one of the reason I don't need/use big routers...but do use smaller router to remove tabs left-over from the CNC cuts. My 1010. To conclude, I would say that  the choice between the two is really about what size bits are you going to use? for handheld work 1/4 is perfect, if you use 1/2" bits, then you are/should probably invest in a router table as well, make using 1/2" much easier and much less stresful : ) Of course if you are a professional such a cabinet maker and go out to job sites, then the 1400 would have to be a better choice.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 226
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #32 on: November 15, 2020, 06:00 PM »
I use my Dewalt compact router a lot and the basic round over, chamfer, top/bottom flush trim bits are the ones I use the most.  Not finding them in the 8mm size so I guess I will continue with the 1/4" shanks.

Do  search on this forum for threads talking about 8mm shank router bits.  There have been many threads about where to buy these bits.  Looking at European websites and ordering from there is one answer.  Google search for 8mm router bits turns up Whiteside, Amana, Freud, CMT all making 8mm shank bits.  Again, you may have to buy them from a European seller and have them shipped to the USA because the US sellers do not carry the 8mm shank bits even though the company they represent does make them.

They have quite a few at Lee Valley. I have several 8mm shank bits from there. I discovered them while searching for a bigger bit to use in my MFK700 with the Paul Mercel modification to the zero degree base a few years ago.
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Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #33 on: November 16, 2020, 02:11 AM »
Trend USA do 8 mm shank cutters.

Peter

Offline afish

  • Posts: 382
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #34 on: November 23, 2020, 07:14 PM »
What are you using for dust extraction for the DW621?  You have to be throwing some pretty big chips to clog that bad boy.  If anything the extractor might be underpowered.  A router throws the particles with pretty good force and you need a lot of air to overcome that force.  Im not super picky with the dust collection of a router but I have always been pretty happy with my DW621's if your working on the edge they dont do to much and would need a shroud to help catch the dust.  The fact that the 1010 only takes .25 or 8mm bits and the 1400 has no way to center the bushing totally turns me off of festool routers.  Any router that costs 600 and you cant adjust the bushing to be centered is just sad.   

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8168
Re: OF 1010 vs OF 1400
« Reply #35 on: November 24, 2020, 11:26 AM »
Just in case anyone is unsure about how much power the 1010 router has versus the 1400, consider that Festool offers a rebating head that is 50 mm in diameter and has a cutter length of 30 mm.

The very same rebating head is designed to fit the 1010 router using the cutter spindle 489285, or the 1400 & 2200 routers using the cutter spindle 490131.

Here's a photo of the rebating head along with the spindle for the 1400/2200 routers. That's a large chunk of metal.  [big grin]  As I've said before, the 1010 is not a lightweight router when it comes to capabilities it's only lightweight in the sense of how much it weighs.

Besides...on a 1010 you can center the bit within the template guide.  [dead horse]





« Last Edit: November 24, 2020, 11:29 AM by Cheese »

Offline contendernut

  • Posts: 45
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #36 on: November 24, 2020, 12:27 PM »
That’s a lot of metal to turn.

I have the 1010 but not the 1400. I have no problems with the 1010 for any handheld task. Now if JessEm would only make a lift for the 2200

Offline Stan Tillinghast

  • Posts: 172
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #37 on: November 24, 2020, 04:21 PM »
I bought an extra router mounting plate for the LR32 system; my idea was to have the 1010 mounted in one for drilling shelf holes, and the 1400 mounted in the other for the hinge cup holes. Don’t have to re-center each time I switch from one to another.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 226
Re: OF 1010 vs OF 1400
« Reply #38 on: November 27, 2020, 12:54 PM »
Just in case anyone is unsure about how much power the 1010 router has versus the 1400, consider that Festool offers a rebating head that is 50 mm in diameter and has a cutter length of 30 mm.

The very same rebating head is designed to fit the 1010 router using the cutter spindle 489285, or the 1400 & 2200 routers using the cutter spindle 490131.

Here's a photo of the rebating head along with the spindle for the 1400/2200 routers. That's a large chunk of metal.  [big grin]  As I've said before, the 1010 is not a lightweight router when it comes to capabilities it's only lightweight in the sense of how much it weighs.

Besides...on a 1010 you can center the bit within the template guide.  [dead horse]


Is that made with the taper of the collet? So it just screws onto the spindle of the router itself?
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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 8168
Re: OF 1010 vs OF 1400
« Reply #39 on: November 27, 2020, 01:21 PM »
Is that made with the taper of the collet? So it just screws onto the spindle of the router itself?

Ya...you just remove the collet & nut and this replaces them.

The same thing goes for the 1010 router.

Offline Stan Tillinghast

  • Posts: 172
Re: 1010 vs 1400
« Reply #40 on: November 27, 2020, 03:58 PM »
There are some tools that just hit the ergonomic sweet spot, and for me the 1010 (like the CXS) is one. Compared to the 1400, the 1010 is just delightful to use. I haven’t had it long, but experience using it with the LR32 system was extremely pleasant. Just needed the up-cutting primal bit which I have now ordered.