Author Topic: Portable cutting table  (Read 49993 times)

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Offline Bob

  • Posts: 26
Portable cutting table
« on: February 01, 2007, 03:44 PM »
I am not talking about a MFT but a table to cut full sized sheets down with the saw and guide.  (I find that full size is best so I can put a sheet of foam and be able to clamp.) I am trying to come up with something fairly light and portable.  Has anyone made one?

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Daviddubya

  • Posts: 704
  • Arizona, USA
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2007, 05:42 PM »
Here is the one I built several years ago:

http://woodstore.stores.yahoo.net/cutplatsheet.html

The platform breaks down into relatively small pieces of plywood.  Set it up on sawhorses and it supports a 4X8 sheet.
David W. Falkenstein
in Cave Creek, AZ, USA

Offline Bob

  • Posts: 26
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2007, 07:47 PM »
Thank you David.  I need one that I could clamp to a solid edge all the way around.  For the guide rails.

Offline Jason White

  • Posts: 301
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2007, 01:19 PM »
I use a cheap, flush hollow-core door and just cut right through it until there's nothing left.  No rigid-foam board needed. 

You could also try this...

http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/how-to/video/old-door-workbench.aspx?ac=ts&ra=fp

TP
- Jason White

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 798
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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2007, 04:10 PM »
Fred

Offline Dan Clark

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2007, 05:07 PM »
Fred,

I looked at that too.  If you're using thick plywood (say 3/4" or have a hollow core door on top, it will probably be fine.   If just foam insullation and especially cutting thinner sheet goods, I think you wouldn't get enough support.

REgards,

Dan.

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 798
  • Michigan
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2007, 08:51 PM »
I've since reconsidered.  I found these at Lowes while looking for hardware and lumber:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=82586-46921-60782&lpage=none

They can be adjusted for height, will support 2900 lbs, are thinner, lighter and easier to move, and will support a sheet better with a couple of 2x's laid in the slots in the top rail with a piece of foam board on top, and won't cost anymore than building the folding table.

Fred
Fred

Offline Jeff Magnus

  • Posts: 35
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2007, 08:17 PM »
I've since reconsidered.  I found these at Lowes while looking for hardware and lumber:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=82586-46921-60782&lpage=none

They can be adjusted for height, will support 2900 lbs, are thinner, lighter and easier to move, and will support a sheet better with a couple of 2x's laid in the slots in the top rail with a piece of foam board on top, and won't cost anymore than building the folding table.

Fred
Those horses are what I use to break down all my sheet goods. They are super light and easy to transport. I use four of them when setting up a table with a 2x4 rack (7'6"X3'6", giving enough room for clamps) that slides into the horses. Takes me 10 min. to setup per job. Works great.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2007, 08:25 PM by Jeff Magnus »

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 798
  • Michigan
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2007, 04:40 PM »
That's good to know Jeff.  I bought a pair last night.  Now I need to build a rack to fit in the slots that can be easily knocked down to be stored or transported.

Fred
Fred

Offline glider

  • Posts: 2
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2007, 04:48 PM »
This is a pretty nice panel cutting table link:


http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/panel_cutting_table.htm#design

Offline MikeDeuce

  • Posts: 12
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2007, 08:30 PM »
This is a pretty nice panel cutting table link:


http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/panel_cutting_table.htm#design

I use one like that and like it for the most part (Though most of my experience with it is with using the EZ-Smart guide [which I sold to fund my foray into Festool -- guess which I prefer ;) ]). I really want to get a sheet of that rigid insulation foam and put it on top, though. It's surprisingly light and stores well leaned against a wall. I can set mine up in about 30 seconds and it's stored just as quickly. It can be a little finicky on uneven floors, but the solutions for that are pretty quick and obvious.

Offline mastercabman

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2007, 04:53 PM »
what i've done before is to use a 1/4" ply or luan and a sheet of exterior styrofoam.set them on saw horses and you have a very light cutting table for full sheets.you can use a little glue between the foam board and the 1/4"ply to keep them together.the styrofoam board won't hurt your blade.when the styrofoam gets ugly,just replace it.of course this is not something you can fold away,but it's easy,cheap and light!
I don't understand!?! I keep cutting it,and it's still too short!

Offline Steven in Iowa

  • Posts: 127
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2007, 06:36 PM »
At the risk of being chastised severely, I use an EZ Smart table setup.  Rip a 2' x 4' piece of plywood, some sacrificial 1X's, screw it all together, and you're done.  It lays on top of 2 sawhorses, or in my case, I've started just using my MFT instead of the sawhorses.  Take a look, it really does work rather well AND I am a Festool user, not an EZ Smart marketeer, so don't even start down that road   ;D
Rookie to be sure!

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4778
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2007, 08:21 PM »
At the risk of being chastised severely, I use an EZ Smart table setup.  Rip a 2' x 4' piece of plywood, some sacrificial 1X's, screw it all together, and you're done.  It lays on top of 2 sawhorses, or in my case, I've started just using my MFT instead of the sawhorses.  Take a look, it really does work rather well AND I am a Festool user, not an EZ Smart marketeer, so don't even start down that road   ;D

The EZ table is a quick and clever way to get variable sized support for panels but the finger support design allows the saw blade to project into open space which greatly reduces the effectiveness of dust collection. To reduce the amount of dust escaping the kerf needs to be enclosed so you need a full coverage support under the workpiece.

Offline Steven in Iowa

  • Posts: 127
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2007, 10:52 PM »
I use a sheet of closed cell foam on top which seems to keep the dust down.
Rookie to be sure!

Offline bustedbolt

  • Posts: 20
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2007, 10:56 PM »
good point michael,

I never thought of that advantage of using foam or something. but I don't think the kerf slot (in the cutting piece) area is really much of a vacuum leak since its filled up with the saw blade anyway.
could be tho. I only notice dust escaping when I am trimming an edge. I dont know if you can really do anything about that.

I have to agree that the ez table works great for me, and is waaay portable. especially compared to "the old ways":
I used to buy an extra sheet of plywood and just charge it to my customer to have a cut table on site!!

brian

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4778
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2007, 11:48 PM »
good point michael,

I never thought of that advantage of using foam or something. but I don't think the kerf slot (in the cutting piece) area is really much of a vacuum leak since its filled up with the saw blade anyway.
could be tho. I only notice dust escaping when I am trimming an edge. I dont know if you can really do anything about that.

I have to agree that the ez table works great for me, and is waaay portable. especially compared to "the old ways":
I used to buy an extra sheet of plywood and just charge it to my customer to have a cut table on site!!

brian

I never thought of that advantage of using foam or something. but I don't think the kerf slot (in the cutting piece) area is really much of a vacuum leak since its filled up with the saw blade anyway.
could be tho. I only notice dust escaping when I am trimming an edge. I dont know if you can really do anything about that.

I have to agree that the ez table works great for me, and is waaay portable. especially compared to "the old ways":
I used to buy an extra sheet of plywood and just charge it to my customer to have a cut table on site!!

brian
[/quote]

The open kerf behind the saw doesn't seem to be a problem, probably because the debris has already been swept up by the saw blade and collected by vac suction. But, without a board of some kind below the blade a lot of stuff is thrown down which you may not even notice 'till later.

When trimming an edge just put another piece of wood of the same thickness (and length ideally) next to the piece you are cutting and much less dust will escape out the open side. If you have another piece of stock of the same thickness that also needs trimming just butt them together and you can trim/straighten both at the same time and eliminate the dust problem too. See John Lucas's article on jointing with the saw/guide system.

Another time the system can't catch all the dust is when the saw blade exits the end of the cut and there is nothing to stop the dust being thrown forward. Putting a block of wood or foam at the end will reduce that.

Offline Dontee

  • Posts: 5
    • My Little Castle
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2008, 12:38 PM »
I put this one together last year with the dowel max. No metal to worry about.

http://dontee.net/mylittlecastle/Shop_Projects/Pages/Sheet_Cutting_Frame.html#0

It has been stored on my sheet goods cart but now it will hang over my head on the new sky hook until I need it. 
I'll just drop it down onto my home made saw horses.

Don


Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 401
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2008, 03:00 PM »
This is a pretty nice panel cutting table link:


http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/panel_cutting_table.htm#design

I made one pretty similar to this.  I covered the top with a piece of 1/4" ply and use it as a general purpose shop table.  Put the 2" styrofoam sheet on top and it's a cutting table.  It is pretty heavy for true portability though, similar in weight to a MFT1080 but larger and slightly more awkward to carry.
Jay St. Peter

Offline Peterm

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2008, 04:47 PM »
Hi

I made one recently - very much phase one of a work in progress!

I needed a narrow portable bench/saw table for when I'm working in/around peoples homes, but one that would also support longer and wider-sized pieces when I need it to, and also provide simple support for when fitting doors. Wooden 'hooks' pull out from the leg cross-members, and a hessian-covered metal angle on the end provides support for a door.

On the opposite side a full-width section pulls out on double-extension drawer-runners and very lightweight legs pivot down for stability. The whole thing's made from WBP ply, apart from the top which is 18mm MDF, drilled out to take clamps a la MFT. I deliberately built it low, to match the height of my 'standard' stack of a Sys 4 and two Sys 1s on a roll-board - 655mm or thereabouts - so longer/wider pieces can be supported with whatever stack happens to be around. Weighs in at around 22 Kilos, and I wouldn't want it any heavier, or higher - Festool MFT designers please take note!

I have some pictures if anyone's interested - and if I can figure out how to post them;)

Cheers, Pete.
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline Hergy

  • Posts: 54
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2008, 09:09 PM »
At the risk of being chastised severely, I use an EZ Smart table setup.  Rip a 2' x 4' piece of plywood, some sacrificial 1X's, screw it all together, and you're done.  It lays on top of 2 sawhorses, or in my case, I've started just using my MFT instead of the sawhorses.  Take a look, it really does work rather well AND I am a Festool user, not an EZ Smart marketeer, so don't even start down that road   ;D

I just finished building one of these EZ smart tables. I am NOT an EZ promoter in any way, shape or form. I participated some in the Festool/ EZ smart wars of the past over on Woodnet and don't care to exhume this subject again. This particular piece of equipment just happened to fit my space and needs requirement. With only a 2' x 4' footprint it fits on top of an assembly cart that I use. I just throw a 2' x 4' piece of 1/4" MDF on top of it and it still serves as a usable table top for finishing or assembly when not being used for cutting.
Dick

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2008, 10:50 PM »
Hi

I made one recently - very much phase one of a work in progress!

I needed a narrow portable bench/saw table for when I'm working in/around peoples homes, but one that would also support longer and wider-sized pieces when I need it to, and also provide simple support for when fitting doors. Wooden 'hooks' pull out from the leg cross-members, and a hessian-covered metal angle on the end provides support for a door.

On the opposite side a full-width section pulls out on double-extension drawer-runners and very lightweight legs pivot down for stability. The whole thing's made from WBP ply, apart from the top which is 18mm MDF, drilled out to take clamps a la MFT. I deliberately built it low, to match the height of my 'standard' stack of a Sys 4 and two Sys 1s on a roll-board - 655mm or thereabouts - so longer/wider pieces can be supported with whatever stack happens to be around. Weighs in at around 22 Kilos, and I wouldn't want it any heavier, or higher - Festool MFT designers please take note!

I have some pictures if anyone's interested - and if I can figure out how to post them;)

Cheers, Pete.


Hi Pete,

   Yes, Yes. Pictures please! This sounds very interesting.    When you post- click the "browse" button to the right of the attachment  box below the post. That will let you open pics into the attachment box. Or just cut and paste the file into the box. Either way , then when you click the post button they will automatically upload.  There is also a how to post pics tutorial   http://festoolownersgroup.com/index.php?topic=292.0

Seth

Offline Peterm

  • Posts: 262
  • I work with wood in West London, UK
    • carpenterhandyman
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2008, 03:01 AM »
OK, here goes. First, a bit of background. I run a carpentry/general handyman business in London and most of the properties I work on/at are Victorian or Georgian terraces with all the space restrictions that come with houses of that age. I needed a narrow portable workbench/cutting table and I couldn't find one to buy, so I made my own. I fit quite a lot of replacement doors, so some way of working on a door whilst cutting hinge pockets and mortices for the locks was a main requirement, but I also wanted the table to be able to support larger items/sheet material when required.

As I said earlier, this is just the first version of a work in progress - looks like this:-

4176-0

It's 1500mm long, 500mm wide (approx 60" x 20") and as I said above, built low to suit my standard systainer stack.

4178-1

Wooden hooks slide out from within the leg crossmembers - the top hook is a piece of builders metalwork/strapping covered in hessian.

4180-2

Door in place, ready for work. This is an area which needs a little refining - the top hook is only friction-held, and doesn't prevent the door from tipping over well enough; needs a way to lock it in place, maybe just a knob threaded into a t-nut or something...

4182-3

This is the other trick - the whole back section slides out on drawer runners to give extra support when needed - say cutting sheet materials, or for laying out larger flat-pack items like this. A couple of lightweight legs pivot down for stability when needed - i.e. most of the time when extended like this!

The whole thing's made from WBP ply aside from the top which is 18mm MDF set in flush with the sides. Very simple construction - as befits version 1.0 of anything - all glued and screwed apart from the top which is just held in with a couple of dominos at either end (didn't want any metal there if I was intending to cut on it) and the dominos are trimmed not-quite flush with the sides, so they can be pulled out with a set of pincers when the top needs replacing.

That's it - apologies for the quality of the snaps, they're just camera-phone quickies grabbed whilst working!

Cheers, Pete.
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline Eli

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2008, 03:32 AM »
Great bench Pete. Love the hooks coming out from the legs. Are the legs a sandwich?
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Offline Peterm

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2008, 05:16 AM »
Great bench Pete. Love the hooks coming out from the legs. Are the legs a sandwich?

Thanks. Yep, the legs are formed from a pair of 9mm ply 'outers' with a 12mm core / hooks. The hooks can also be positioned at the higher level crossmember as well, for smaller workpieces - or very narrow doors ;)
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline Dan Clark

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2008, 09:54 AM »
OK, here goes. First, a bit of background. I run a carpentry/general handyman business in London and most of the properties I work on/at are Victorian or Georgian terraces with all the space restrictions that come with houses of that age. I needed a narrow portable workbench/cutting table and I couldn't find one to buy, so I made my own. I fit quite a lot of replacement doors, so some way of working on a door whilst cutting hinge pockets and mortices for the locks was a main requirement, but I also wanted the table to be able to support larger items/sheet material when required.
...
That's it - apologies for the quality of the snaps, they're just camera-phone quickies grabbed whilst working!

Cheers, Pete.
Pete,

That's a great bench/work table.   And the pics are very good, especially considering they come from a camera phone!   

I liked the bench so much that I started a thread on the Journal of Light Construction forums (JLC Online) about your bench: http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=41190.   You should check out the JLC Online in general and especially the Finish Carpentry forums: http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=7.  I think that the guys there will be interested in your ideas and vice-versa.

The moderator of that forum is Gary Katz.   He is a leading light among finish carpenters and a major driving force in improving the finish carpentry profession.   I've seen one of presentations and have met him.  Amazing guy.   Besides being the JLC Finish Carpentry Forum moderator, he has his own site: http://www.garymkatz.com/ that contains lots of resources for finish carpenters (reviews, tutorials, etc).

Gary built his own door bench: http://www.garymkatz.com/ChartsDrawings/door_bench.html.  His bench shares many features of your bench and vice versa.   Take a look.

Also, Gary and Greg Burnet designed an assembly and cutting table: http://www.garymkatz.com/ChartsDrawings/assembly_table.html.   This table is similar to the EZ table mentioned above, but Gary and Greg grew frustrated with it.  So they redesigned and built versions with much higher quality components to meet professional demands.  That might give you some good ideas too.

One question, what is "WBP ply"?

Regards,

Dan.

Offline jonny round boy

  • Posts: 3227
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2008, 11:54 AM »
The question wasn't directed at me, but since I'm here, I'll answer  ;)

WBP Ply is a common term in the UK. WBP stands for 'Water & Boil Proof'. It's hardwood ply, made with waterproof, high-temp adhesive. Technically it's the adhesive that's WBP, but the term is used for the plywood.

Slightly better than softwood ply for using outside, but not as good as marine ply.
Festoolian since February 2006

TS55R EBQ saw - CTL26 - CTL Mini - OF1400EBQ router - KS120 Kapex SCMS - ETS150/3 sander - RO90 sander - DF500 Domino - PDC18/4 drill - PSC420 jigsaw - OFK500 trimmer

Wish list (in no particular order!): Anything not listed above....

Offline Ned

  • Posts: 1146
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #27 on: February 01, 2008, 12:12 PM »
Pete--

Nice bench.

The pics are good.  I wouldn't have guessed you'd used your phone.


Found on the web, after sorting through a lot of math information:

Quote
Burlap, also known as sack cloth or hessian cloth, is a dense woven fabric.

Ned
« Last Edit: February 01, 2008, 12:13 PM by Ned Young »

Offline Peterm

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #28 on: February 01, 2008, 12:16 PM »
Dan, thanks for the links - looks like another good forum; I'll hardly have time to do any work! Woah, Gary Katz's door bench is similar - or mine's similar to his!  :-[ I guess there's only so many ways to solve the problem; no plagiarism intended. On the contrary, I like his idea of (looks like) old carpet to cushion the door/workpiece. Interesting to see he keeps all his door-hanging tools in the bench; I was thinking of adding some kind of storage for clamps etc.. underneath the worksurface in the central section between the legs - there are full-depth cross pieces running front-to-back to help support the top - though I'm a little worried it might end up as a dumping ground, adding nothing but weight...

Re. WBP ply; sorry, maybe this is a UK-only term. WBP stands for 'Water and Boil Proof' - basically it's an exterior grade plywood, approx. one grade down from marine ply.

Cheers, Pete. (trying hard not to be separated by a common language  ;))

edit - Duh! JRB beat me to it! Must be having a POETS day (and I'm not even going to start trying to explain that one...)
« Last Edit: February 01, 2008, 12:21 PM by Peterm »
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline Dan Clark

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2008, 05:39 PM »
JRB, Pete,

Thanks for the ply info.   I can usually decipher "English", but sometimes people pop a new one on me. 

And yes, I think is a fair amount of convergence of ideas.   ;D

Dan.

Offline Dave Ronyak

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2008, 12:14 PM »
Peterm,

Awesomely clever design!!! Please tell us more about the leg braces.  How are they attached when acting as braces?  How are they repositioned for transport or storage of the table?

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Peterm

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #31 on: February 03, 2008, 01:20 PM »
Hi and thanks.

The leg braces are simply attached to the leg and the cross-members (underneath the worktop) with hinges...

4230-0

As you pull out the leg...

4232-1

...the brace drops into place - they were hinged with a small gap (1mm) between the ends, so they straighten out slightly beyond the flat and gravity keeps everything in place.

4234-2

The braces work out so as you open or close them, they flex the central support they're attached to, and this makes the legs snap into place and stay put without any catches. There's probably an ancient mathematical formula for working this measurement out, but I did it with a long strip of paper and some sticky tape; works for me!

4236-3

The braces are attached towards one side of the legs rather than central, to allow space underneath for systainers, extractors etc... when the bench is being used.

Hope this helps, Pete.
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline Texastutt

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #32 on: February 03, 2008, 09:18 PM »
If I did not already have a MFT this one just might get made. Fantastic work!
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to prosper." - Ben Franklin

Offline Dave Ronyak

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #33 on: February 03, 2008, 09:29 PM »
Peterm,

Thanks, again, for the details of the folding leg construction.  I cannot help repeating myself:  Awesomely clever design!!

I think a variation of your leg brace design could be fitted to Festool's MFTs to mitigate racking that occurs when one tries to hand plane.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline John Stevens

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #34 on: February 03, 2008, 09:47 PM »
I cannot help repeating myself:  Awesomely clever design!!

Ditto, thanks for sharing your ideas here.

Regards,

John
What this world needs is a good retreat.
--Captain Beefheart

Offline Gary Katz

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #35 on: February 04, 2008, 10:31 AM »
Peter,
GREAT BENCH!!!!  I love the leg design and the hook door supports with hooks that slide into those mortises so the door won't slip off but the support is flush with the leg so it folds up. Ingenious.  And the leg supports are really great. I'll have to figure that one out for sure!! Does the top come off so you can put tools in there and still lay your tools down flat to cut?
Gary
« Last Edit: February 04, 2008, 10:34 AM by Gary Katz »

Offline John Langevin

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  • Springfield, MA
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #36 on: February 04, 2008, 12:26 PM »
Petern, Nice work! regarding your comment on the second pic 'the top hook ....' What if you simply jigsawed a hole in the end of the benchtop apron so you use a 6" pistol grip style bar clamp?
Practicing Mediocrity Never Begets Perfection

Offline Peterm

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #37 on: February 04, 2008, 12:39 PM »
Gary

Thanks for your comments, much appreciated.

The top comes off, but not in the way you mean - I made it removable for replacement, rather than for regular usage. I think 'Version2' will have some kind of storage built into the central section between the legs (where the clamps are in the first picture on this page) if I can figure out how to access it, though I'd have to be strict with myself not to just dump stuff in there!

In the meantime though, it seems to be working out pretty well as it is - so far, anyway ;)

Thanks again, Pete
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #38 on: February 04, 2008, 12:47 PM »
Hi,
   I think that storage idea would be great for stuff used directly with the table. More clamps, measuring and layout, marking tools, and fixtures for the table. If you only keep those items in it, you might not be tempted to just dump stuff in.   


Seth

Offline Peterm

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  • I work with wood in West London, UK
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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #39 on: February 04, 2008, 12:53 PM »
Petern, Nice work! regarding your comment on the second pic 'the top hook ....' What if you simply jigsawed a hole in the end of the benchtop apron so you use a 6" pistol grip style bar clamp?

Yep, that would do it - or even just a quick clamp against the end of the bench to stop the metal hook moving. Be nice to have something a bit more 'built-in' that didn't involve clamps, though!

Cheers, Pete
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline woodshopdemos

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #40 on: February 04, 2008, 01:21 PM »
The one I have been using works so very well that I haven't felt the need to make it more "finished."
Here, Elena uses it:
The worktable is comprised of two standard wood horses, a 3/4" construction grade sheet of plywood and a 1" piece of foam board, taped into position. We have the lumberyard deliver the panels and they stack them on the panel cart. She can then just "tilt" the next sheet onto the table.


like that:


it is very easy to make perfect cuts frm any side.



The page where she does this:
http://www.woodshopdemos.com/fes-cab-2.htm
In memory of John Lucas (1937 - 2010)

Offline greg mann

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #41 on: February 04, 2008, 02:53 PM »
The one I have been using works so very well that I haven't felt the need to make it more "finished."

Maybe, John, but Pete has to do his own work.  ;)

My guess is that Pete also sees a certain marketing quality to how he sets up on the job. Rightly or wrongly, people often gauge the value and skill of a workman by how he and his equipment 'look' on the job. Additionally, he tailored his table to facilitate the handling of doors which would not be so easy to do on the foam. I am not disparaging the foam 'cause that is what I use too.

If Pete could get Ilena as an assistant it might help getting more jobs, eh?  8)
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline woodshopdemos

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #42 on: February 04, 2008, 03:52 PM »
Greg,
   I understand and agree with you 100 percent.  Some of the lattice work and tension box cretions I have seen here and on other forums are real works of art and I would probably emulate in different circumstances. and maybe I should anyway. would be a good project.
In memory of John Lucas (1937 - 2010)

Offline Peterm

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #43 on: February 04, 2008, 05:08 PM »
John, I have something similar back in the workshop and it works well - even if I have to use it myself, i.e. with no lovely assistant... But Greg's very perceptive; whilst the table I made was for purely practical reasons, it doesn't exactly hurt to give the impression of efficiency and tidiness - particularly amongst my clients with a media and publishing background e.g. career-women and chaps with uncommonly tidy kitchens...

Cheers, Pete.
The only thing worse than spending more than you need is spending less than you should have...

Offline Dave Ronyak

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #44 on: February 04, 2008, 09:33 PM »
Pete,

If they aren't impressed with your portable table, they lack understanding. 

John Lucas,

In the photo of your foam topped table, is your Boom Arm fitted with the 36 mm AS hose to the saw?  Mine is currently fitted with a 27 mm AS hose, but I have been thinking of switching it and making a short 27 mm to fit on the tool end when needed, e.g. for those older model Festool products such as Deltex 93 that have an oval DC outlet and thus require the smaller elastomeric hose end fitting.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline woodshopdemos

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #45 on: February 05, 2008, 02:36 PM »
Dave R,
   I have no idea. I am using the boom arm as it came out of the box. Dont know the details. what should I look for?
In memory of John Lucas (1937 - 2010)

Offline Dave Ronyak

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  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #46 on: February 05, 2008, 09:56 PM »
Dave R,
   I have no idea. I am using the boom arm as it came out of the box. Dont know the details. what should I look for?

John,

If the elastomeric fitting at the tool end has internal circumferentially extending ribs and fits iINTO the DC outlet of your TS 55 saw, and OVER the OVAL DC fittings of a Deltex 93 or 1010 router, the hose should be 27 mm. 

If the elastomeric fitting at the tool end does not have internal circumferentially extending ribs (and is smooth inside) and fits OVER the DC outlet of your TS 55 saw, and is too big to grip the round DC fittings of a RO 125 or LS 130, the hose should be 36 mm.

At least, these are the way my AS hoses came from Festool.  The 27 mm hose is standard issue with the CT 22 E vacuum.  The 50 mm hose extension included with the Boom Arm is noticeably larger in diameter than the 27 mm hose.

I was curious because in the photo showing the hose on the Boom Arm I did not see the connector and the 50 mm hose.  I have mine setup with the 27 mm hose and the connector to the 50 mm hose is very near the first hose and power cord support on the Boom.  I am thinking of buying a 16' a 36 mm hose to mount on the Boom Arm, cutting off 4 to 5 feet, fitting both ends with vacuum machine end fittings (50 mm?), then making up a short hose with that remnant with proper Festool fittings and another short 27 mm hose.  That would enable quickly switching between 27 mm for the sanders, and 36 mm hoses for the TS 55 saw, 1400 router and for sweeping the floor.  And give me more total hose length for vacuum sweeping the shop.  As you likely know, it is pretty easy to clog the 27 mm hose when taking a full pass (edge) routing.  And that quickly makes a big mess!!

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Dan Clark

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #47 on: February 08, 2008, 12:34 PM »
On the JLC Finish Carpentry Forum, Norm posted this:
http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=358855.  His idea is to use a massage bench as the basis for a cutting/assembly table.   Apparently these benches are rated at 400Lbs, are quite stable, and set up in seconds.   And they can be purchased with a carrying bag for about $200.   Interesting idea!

Dan.

Offline Steveo48

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #48 on: February 24, 2008, 09:25 AM »
Very nice bench Pete, I love seeing other peoples ideas in action!

Steve

Offline Jim Dailey

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #49 on: February 24, 2008, 01:22 PM »
Dan,

If you do a "search" on the Sam's Club site under "Massage Tables" you will find about 15 table with a dozen under $200  Some as cheap as $100

jim
Life is just a series of projects...

Offline Corwin

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #50 on: February 24, 2008, 05:32 PM »
The current issue of ShopNotes magazine also has plans for a portable workbench.

Offline Raf

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #51 on: February 26, 2008, 06:52 AM »
Walko bench ?  ;D ;D ;D

Offline Jim Dailey

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #52 on: February 26, 2008, 12:34 PM »
Raf,

How is your Walko bench working out? 

jim
Life is just a series of projects...

Offline Loren Hedahl

  • Posts: 160
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #53 on: February 26, 2008, 12:39 PM »
Very nice bench Pete, I love seeing other peoples ideas in action!

Steve

I also like to watch other people work!javascript:void(0);
Cheesy
Location (generally):  Thirty five miles west of Seattle by the way the crow flies.

You can tell a Norwegian, but you can't tell him much!

Offline UCLA Fan

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  • huh?
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #54 on: April 29, 2008, 12:30 PM »
I use two purchased folding plastic sawhorses (2 for $30 from the BORG) then I add two 24" wide hollow-core-luan-flush-faced-interior-doors laid side by side as a very light weight bench top. The doors were $10 each and being torsion box construction they are much stronger (and significantly lighter) then one sheet of 3/4 piywood. Next I add a 2" rigid foam insulation cutting top. Since my shop is small I cut the rigid foam to fit the width of the doors (24") this improves storage and mobility. With this setup I can have a portable cutting bench that is 24 or 48 inches wide depending on my needs. Total investment - $70.  I like using the door as additional table surface when needed so I just lay the foam on top of the doors when cutting.

Frank

"Mark...DON"T measure"

Offline johne

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #55 on: May 01, 2008, 02:30 PM »
Here's the one I made. Easy to assemble or disassemble and it doesn t take up much space
It 's got wheels to move it around. Size is 8x4 feet.

6886-0

6888-1

I used these things to join the base together

6890-2

6892-3

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #56 on: May 01, 2008, 02:40 PM »
Hi,



   johne,    Knock down benches, great use for bed rail connectors.   That is a pretty nice looking table.



Seth

Offline Dino

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #57 on: July 26, 2008, 11:26 AM »

[/quote]

Also, Gary and Greg Burnet designed an assembly and cutting table: http://www.garymkatz.com/ChartsDrawings/assembly_table.html.   This table is similar to the EZ table mentioned above, but Gary and Greg grew frustrated with it.  So they redesigned and built versions with much higher quality components to meet professional demands.  That might give you some good ideas too.

One question, what is "WBP ply"?

Regards,


Dan.
[/quote]

Dan,
The ez smart table is a patented eurekazone product.
Gary and Greg don't designed any table. They simply copied a patented design.
The idea was to make a portable and affordable table.
If Gary and Greg used 2x4s instead of 1x4s and they made a stronger and heavier smart table
using expensive componemts and spending more time in the making,
 that don't make the smart table Gary's and Greg's design. Another version? Yes.

This table is similar to the EZ table mentioned above, but Gary and Greg grew frustrated with it.
Very nice statement.  The most popular  and best selling item of eurekazone's product line
made 2 Festool paid reviewers upset?
You know very well that Festool is sponsoring Gary Katz's road saw.
Greg have similar reasons not to like anything that eurekazone makes.
Please, set the record straight and give people ALL the F-Facts.
Using an open forum to spread misinformation and confusion to consumers
is very typical to Festool associatess, contractors, paid reviewers. and  misinformers.

Shame on you and this forum.

Dino Makropoulos
Eurekazone INC.
53 National Road.
Edison NJ,
08817.

Offline Loren Hedahl

  • Posts: 160
Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #58 on: July 26, 2008, 01:29 PM »


Also, Gary and Greg Burnet designed an assembly and cutting table: http://www.garymkatz.com/ChartsDrawings/assembly_table.html.   This table is similar to the EZ table mentioned above, but Gary and Greg grew frustrated with it.  So they redesigned and built versions with much higher quality components to meet professional demands.  That might give you some good ideas too.

One question, what is "WBP ply"?

Regards,


Dan.
[/quote]

Dan,
The ez smart table is a patented eurekazone product.
Gary and Greg don't designed any table. They simply copied a patented design.
The idea was to make a portable and affordable table.
If Gary and Greg used 2x4s instead of 1x4s and they made a stronger and heavier smart table
using expensive componemts and spending more time in the making,
 that don't make the smart table Gary's and Greg's design. Another version? Yes.

This table is similar to the EZ table mentioned above, but Gary and Greg grew frustrated with it.
Very nice statement.  The most popular  and best selling item of eurekazone's product line
made 2 Festool paid reviewers upset?
You know very well that Festool is sponsoring Gary Katz's road saw.
Greg have similar reasons not to like anything that eurekazone makes.
Please, set the record straight and give people ALL the F-Facts.
Using an open forum to spread misinformation and confusion to consumers
is very typical to Festool associatess, contractors, paid reviewers. and  misinformers.

Shame on you and this forum.

Dino Makropoulos
Eurekazone INC.
53 National Road.
Edison NJ,
08817.

[/quote]


First time I looked at it.  Sure does seem to have a kinship to the EZ table.

My favorite is an old chipboard banquet table that fell apart when it got wet.  I salvaged the legs and made a grid out of 2X4's.  It is light weight, foldable and I can clamp to it almost any place.

I've had it awhile and it looks like sin, but still works great!
Location (generally):  Thirty five miles west of Seattle by the way the crow flies.

You can tell a Norwegian, but you can't tell him much!

Offline Rich Engelhardt

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Re: Portable cutting table
« Reply #59 on: August 22, 2008, 06:07 AM »
This is a pretty nice panel cutting table link:


http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/panel_cutting_table.htm#design
Hello,
I made that same table 3 weeks ago.
It does what it's supposed to do for the most part & since I used some 2x4's I had on hand, my only real cost was the $20.00 legs from Lowes.
When it gets chewed up, next one will use 2x2's around the perimeter instead of the notched 2x4 and dowels to secure the cross rails instead of screws.