Author Topic: Alternative precision domino jig (MFT+parf guide system+domino cross stop acc)  (Read 918 times)

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Offline Jurgen_ZA

  • Posts: 5
My first post here, inspired by the excellent precision jig shared by user ‘Ola C’. A version of which I built and have already used for picture framing projects. The additional accuracy of the Ola C jig has made it my go to item for any small piece domino work. I’ve also found that hand pressure (as opposed to setting clamps) is often sufficient to keep parts in place while using the domino, greatly speeding up repetitive work.

My alternative solution for precision domino work, makes use of a Festool MFT dog hole layout, the parf guide system (v1) and the domino cross stop accessory.

This jig is probably best explained in pictures, but some explanatory notes below.

- The angle setting jigs x2 (orientated 45 or 90 degree as required) are secured on the MFT table using dogs.
- The DF500 is positioned relative to the workpiece, using location pin holes (cut into the angle setting jigs) for the cross stop jig. 
- The location pin choice and cross stop measurement are transferred from left to right jig (or right to left) when the opposing face dominos are cut.
- The jigs also act as a squaring face of the domino main body or cross stop locating pin faces. I note that the cross stop faces are not exactly aligned with the DF500 main body face (estimate 1mm short). I therefore position the left and right jigs to ensure I use either the DF500 face or the two cross stop faces to square to the workpiece. Otherwise there is the opportunity for slight misalignment.
- I lightly clamp the cross stop jig to the MFT table using screw clamps. This ensures squareness to workpiece when making cut. This is a clumsy solution and something more elegant is required.


Additional notes:
- The angle setting jig dog holes are cut using the parf guide system.
- 45 and 90 degree cuts on the jigs are made using the parf dog + rail clip system. This is important since the angles need to be referenced to the MFT hole layout pattern.
- Cross stop pin location holes were made using the domino DF500 (5x30 cutter). I clamped both jigs together when making the cut to ensure the pin locations are perfectly mirrored on both LH and RH jigs. Made cut with widest domino setting. This ensures a >10mm slot hight, that aligns with the cross stop pin height.
- The jigs are cut from 16mm Valchomat. A jig from thicker material would be better to allow for higher placed dominos. I intend making one from 30mm Valchromat as a next iteration. You could easily place a spacer sheet under the DF500+cross stops for higher positioned dominos. There may be some complication cutting the cross stop pin location holes with thicker material if using the process from note above.
- The UJK wedge system proved to be very efficient for clamping. Also used the bessey MFT toggle clamps successfully. Screw clamps are a pain.









* IMG_3323.jpg (450.47 kB - downloaded 41 times.)
* IMG_3323.jpg (450.47 kB - downloaded 28 times.)


Hope this is of interest and use the community!
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 09:42 AM by Jurgen_ZA »

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Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 36
Beautiful, great work and thanks for the design.  Adding this to my list of projects.

I got a Parf guide this spring and have been fiddling with all sorts of jig/fixture possibilities exploiting external parts built with 20mm grid patterns mounted to my MFT. Would be easy to take your design and make 30 degree or other templates as desired. Lots of capability. Thanks again.

Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 36
Also, what is spacing interval on your Domino mortises cut in the angle setting jig faces? 
Was there a criteria used to determine spacing, and last, it appears you have two sets of mortises, one each for 45 and 90 degree use?

Offline Jurgen_ZA

  • Posts: 5
Also, what is spacing interval on your Domino mortises cut in the angle setting jig faces? 
Was there a criteria used to determine spacing, and last, it appears you have two sets of mortises, one each for 45 and 90 degree use?

Appreciate the feedback.

The spacing interval and number of location mortises was arbitrary. As you correctly note, I planned 2 sets for 45 or 90 degree jig placement and chose spacing intervals of 20mm. You could probably get away with one mortise for each angle placement. It would also reduce the chance of making a mistake when transferring your measurements. On the other hand having a few extra mortises reduces the fiddle time with setting the cross stops.


Offline Jurgen_ZA

  • Posts: 5
Beautiful, great work and thanks for the design.  Adding this to my list of projects.

I got a Parf guide this spring and have been fiddling with all sorts of jig/fixture possibilities exploiting external parts built with 20mm grid patterns mounted to my MFT. Would be easy to take your design and make 30 degree or other templates as desired. Lots of capability. Thanks again.

Great point re 30 or 60 degree templates. I saw a Peter Parfitt has a vid on isometric hole patterns which could be used to cut the angles effectively.

Offline Vtshopdog

  • Posts: 36
Couple thoughts:

A single set of 30-60-90 degree jig triangles with mortises on each of the right angle legs would function as jigs for both angles.  (or could be any other right angle triangle one might choose)

Second, how are you referencing your panel edges to be parallel with the hole pattern drilled with Parf system?  You mention cutting with rail clips, has that been effective? 

For my "Parf Panels" I have been drilling a grid then use dogs to mount the drilled panel on my MFT and cut one edge parallel to the panel holes.  Once I have one reference edge parallel to the panel holes the piece can be chopped up at whatever angles and dimensions I need. 

Offline Jurgen_ZA

  • Posts: 5
Couple thoughts:

A single set of 30-60-90 degree jig triangles with mortises on each of the right angle legs would function as jigs for both angles.  (or could be any other right angle triangle one might choose)

Second, how are you referencing your panel edges to be parallel with the hole pattern drilled with Parf system?  You mention cutting with rail clips, has that been effective? 

For my "Parf Panels" I have been drilling a grid then use dogs to mount the drilled panel on my MFT and cut one edge parallel to the panel holes.  Once I have one reference edge parallel to the panel holes the piece can be chopped up at whatever angles and dimensions I need.

With regards your question on referencing the panel edges. Yes, also drill a grid in the chosen jig material and then mount it on the MFT table using parf dogs. Then cut 45 and 90 degree edges with festool guide rail+rail clips+parf dogs mounted in the MFT. I did create midpoint holes (i.e. at 48mm spacing) on the MFT to enable a cut line closer to the jig dog holes. Seemed to me the most accurate way to get a match between jig and MFT. I had a complication with my parf guide system drill bit producing an undersized hole. Its not damaged in any way, so frustrating to say the least. Have to lightly sand the holes. Thats not an accurate process and introduces additional error. However been happy with results.

Good idea for the 30/60/90 jig spec. May have a go at at isometric table pattern in the week.

Offline Jurgen_ZA

  • Posts: 5
Couple thoughts:

A single set of 30-60-90 degree jig triangles with mortises on each of the right angle legs would function as jigs for both angles.  (or could be any other right angle triangle one might choose)

Second, how are you referencing your panel edges to be parallel with the hole pattern drilled with Parf system?  You mention cutting with rail clips, has that been effective? 

For my "Parf Panels" I have been drilling a grid then use dogs to mount the drilled panel on my MFT and cut one edge parallel to the panel holes.  Once I have one reference edge parallel to the panel holes the piece can be chopped up at whatever angles and dimensions I need.

With regards your question on referencing the panel edges. Yes, also drill a grid in the chosen jig material and then mount it on the MFT table using parf dogs. Then cut 45 and 90 degree edges with festool guide rail+rail clips+parf dogs mounted in the MFT. I did create midpoint holes (i.e. at 48mm spacing) on the MFT to enable a cut line closer to the jig dog holes. Seemed to me the most accurate way to get a match between jig and MFT. I had a complication with my parf guide system drill bit producing an undersized hole. Its not damaged in any way, so frustrating to say the least. Have to lightly sand the holes. Thats not an accurate process and introduces additional error. However been happy with results.

Good idea for the 30/60/90 jig spec. May have a go at at isometric table pattern in the week.

Meant to confirm that I cut all the angles with jig material mounted on the MFT. I initially also cut one reference edge on the MFT and then cut the 45 on the Kapex. It did not work out and was slightly out of angle. Which produced about a 2mm error on the domino alignment. Possibly since it was a smaller piece I was not properly referencing it against the Kapex fence. Cutting all angles on the MFT produced better results for me.