Author Topic: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build  (Read 12109 times)

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Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« on: October 07, 2020, 01:39 PM »
I have the cart a bit ahead of the horse on my medium version of the BF/MFT workbench designed by @AtomicRyan .  My workbench will be one meter wide and two meters long.  My shop is in a fully enclosed basement with no external doors and everything coming in or going out must pass through a hallway door and flight of stairs.  I would have liked a workbench using a full sheet of MDF, but it would dominate the assembly area of my shop.

I ordered a lot of long lead time items for this and other projects, which included the Dash-Board guide rail kit for the T-track.  The Guide Rail Bracket Bundle from Rob Schumacher arrived and it is a nice piece of engieering.  Rob makes them by hand and builds them in batches, so expect to wait for them.








I don’t have access ot the U.S. 8020 site for aluminum extrusion, but there is a similar source in Germany called item24 that has a great assortment of material, as well as an online engineerning tool to design anything from their inventory of parts.  The engineering tool is cumbersome to use at first and lacks the sophistication of AutoCAD, but it works.  I was able to design this workbench in about an hour and rotate it around in 3D space before going to the next step and creating engineering drawings.

This is a screen shot from the engineering software.





As each piece of aluminum is added to the drawing, the software automatically identifies the drill points, adds the hardware to join the item, and builds the bill of material.  The parts count was updating as I added new material, and I was able to make quick QC checks during the design.  In a couple of places, the vertical sections didn’t register withe horizontal section, and I could verify this because the mounting hardware count didn’t increment as it should.  A quick digital jiggle of the part, and it joined correctly and the parts count incremented.

When I was satisfied with the design, I went to the next step to create the build package that would be used by item24 to develop the cost.  The output of this process was a 26-page PDF created by the engineering software.  I downloaded the file to perform a thorough QC of the workbench and found two more areas that had not correctly joined each other.  It was easy to go back, make the correction, and continue.  The PDF included the manufacturing sheets for each piece of 40x40mm and 80x40mm extrusion, dimensions for the CNC cutting and drilling, an exploded view of the workbench, and step by step assembly instructions unique to my design.

My cost for the complete kit as shown is just under €1,200 (about $1,413 today), which includes shipping.  I could have bought the extrusion in 3-meter sections and done all of the cutting and drilling myself, but this is something I am quite comfortable paying for.  Prices aren’t available on the website, so I don’t know how much each 3-meter section would cost.  This does not include the cost for the 19mm MDF top, 15mm MDF or plywood shelf, plywood for drawers, shelves, and partitions, or the drawer slides and other assorted hardware.

I have the UJK Parf MK II Guide System to make the 20mm dog holes in the MDF.  After the holes are drilled, I’ll prepare the top for a strip of HDPE like Ryan did and coat the top and bottom surface with a 50/50 mixture of poly and thinner.

I won’t be duplicating Ryan’s video log of his build, but I will update this thread during the build.

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Offline mkasdin

  • Posts: 475
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2020, 02:00 AM »
If your using regular series 10 then the price is roughly $2.30 a linear foot. The top rail is double that about $2.50. It seems your spending a lot to have it shipped and fabricated. You could get a machine shop to cut it for you assuming you have a drill press? How did you settle on 1 meter x 2 meter for the dimension? I think I see wheels which means it might move and even with the wheels locked have a little play?

Offline johnredl

  • Posts: 33
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2020, 04:29 AM »
Looking forward to reading more about your build. How long before you start?

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2020, 09:38 AM »
If your using regular series 10 then the price is roughly $2.30 a linear foot. The top rail is double that about $2.50. It seems your spending a lot to have it shipped and fabricated. You could get a machine shop to cut it for you assuming you have a drill press? How did you settle on 1 meter x 2 meter for the dimension? I think I see wheels which means it might move and even with the wheels locked have a little play?
You might have missed my location under my avatar, but I live in Germany, so buying from a German distributor is better for me.   [laughing]   I know I am paying a premium to have the extrusion cut and drilled, but as I stated, I am quite happy with this.  I do have all of the tools necessary to do the cutting and drilling, and if item24 didn't offer this service, I would have purchased enough 3-meter sections and done it myself.  Based on previous metal work I've done, having a machine shop do the cutting would be more expensive than having item24 do it.  This is one of the reasons I'm not considering having a shop prepare the MDF for the 20mm dog holes.

The 1 x 2 meter dimension was driven by the size of my shop.  I have a 4.5 x 5 meter area with large machinery with dust collection, and an adjacent 4.5 x 5 meter area for assembly and work that doesn't required a fixed dust collection system, such as my Festool equipment.  The door between the two areas is just over a meter wide, so the workbench has to fit through the door.
The casters are double-locking, and are common here.  Not only does the lock secure the wheel from turning, but it also locks the pivot, which keeps the castor from rotating.  I use double locking casters on my bandsaw and jointer/planer and it takes unrealistic force to make them slide on the floor.  With three of the four corners locked on the 600 x 800mm base, the bandsaw will trip over before it moves on the floor.  My workbench has double-locking casters on each corner and normal casters in the middle.  I'm confident that it won't move when locked.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2020, 09:41 AM »
Looking forward to reading more about your build. How long before you start?
I'm waiting on the invoice from item24, which I should have today or tomorrow.  I won't know what the delivery time is until I receive invoice.  However, I will start the assembly the same day the shipment arrives.

Offline Mortiser

  • Posts: 93
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2020, 10:09 AM »
Thanks @MikeGE . I'm following this as I've already bought my 40mm extrusions from 8020 but haven't finalized a design. Thanks for posting and keeping us updated.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 1119
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2020, 02:48 PM »
Great work bench! I have wanted to get the Dashboard parts since I first saw them, and an 80/20 table offers so much customization. MFT's are great for site work, but for home your version blows it away just in the size of it.

Are you going to do a wood vise setup on it?

After the holes are drilled, I’ll prepare the top for a strip of HDPE like Ryan did and coat the top and bottom surface with a 50/50 mixture of poly and thinner.
Excellent idea to put finish on the top. I would recommend pre-finishing the top before drilling or even cutting though, as the wood absorbs the finish the hole sizes WILL change, and there is not much clearance in the dog holes to begin with. Finishing the underside would even help with a consistent moisture absorption, depending on your environment.

If the castors aren't retractable, make sure to get them locking so not only do the wheels not roll, but also don't rotate.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2020, 08:47 AM »
My item24 order arrived today in four packages.  Three were delivered by a freight forwarder, and the smallest package came through the mail.  The long package was the heaviest at 66 KG.





After unpacking everything for the inventory, I was happy to see labels on each machined piece that included the order number, part number that matched the assembly sheet, and the item description.





As expected, the shipment was complete and the items are ready for assembly. 

Offline waho6o9

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    • Garage Door Handyman.com
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2020, 10:01 AM »
"I was happy to see labels on each machined piece that included the order number, part number that matched the assembly sheet, and the item description."

Nice to see that level of customer service! Good job

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2020, 10:35 AM »
I spoke too soon on the content of the labels.  I thought one of the reference numbers on the label corresponded to the assembly sheet, but it wasn't. The number referred to the machining process.  It doesn't matter, since the assembly page has plenty of detail to start the assembly.


Offline Bugsysiegals

  • Posts: 823
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2020, 10:46 AM »
I've build an 8020 outfeed table and will be building some workbenches in the future ... it seems extrusion is way more expensive in Germany or that they charged you $700+ for the cutting/tapping of the extrusion which is just crazy!

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 814
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2020, 11:08 AM »
I've build an 8020 outfeed table and will be building some workbenches in the future ... it seems extrusion is way more expensive in Germany or that they charged you $700+ for the cutting/tapping of the extrusion which is just crazy!


Well, there are also six castors and loads of connecting stuff to consider...
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2020, 12:39 PM »
I've build an 8020 outfeed table and will be building some workbenches in the future ... it seems extrusion is way more expensive in Germany or that they charged you $700+ for the cutting/tapping of the extrusion which is just crazy!

It's apples to oranges when comparing prices between the U.S. and Germany for similar items.  To give a point of reference, a 3-meter section of the 80x40 extrusion that I selected is €107.70 (about $119.14), or about €10.94 ($12.10) per foot, in quantities less than eight pieces.  A 3-meter section of the 40x40 extrusion I selected is €61.80 (about $68.48), or about €6.28 ($6.95) per foot, in quantities less than eight pieces.  It really doesn't matter to me what 8020 in the U.S. costs, since the surface shipping, VAT, and import duties would be too prohibitive for me to consider.

If I bought the two sizes of extrusion in 3-meter sections, I would need three sections of the 80x40 and seven sections of the 40x40 in order to minimize waste.  My cost for just the extrusion would be €755.70 (about $836.00).  Assuming shipping would be the same at €57.83 (about $63.98), the cost for just the extrusion delivered to my door is €813.53 (about $899.98).  I don't have a quote for the six castors and all of the attaching hardware, but based on buying smaller castors locally, I do not doubt that the cost would easily be another €150 (about $165.94).  This means the cost to cut, drill, tap, break all edges, and clean up is about €250.10 (about $276.67).

The extra cost for the CNC work might be crazy to you, but not to me.  As I stated in my first post, I am very happy to pay for the machining.

Offline mkasdin

  • Posts: 475
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2020, 02:00 PM »
That’s not that much considering that the pre-fabrication is done right and tight tolerances. You have a lot of parts. I might have designed a smaller work surface myself and winged it myself  That way if I fouled up, I’m just replacing a $30 part, not wrecking an entire build $$. Then you have the confidence to do the larger build. I do have a lot of 80/20 sitting around, so there’s something to be said letting someone else do the (heavy lifting) work. Now you have a big erector set, ready for assembly. One and Done. ✅

Offline Bugsysiegals

  • Posts: 823
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2020, 02:27 PM »
I've build an 8020 outfeed table and will be building some workbenches in the future ... it seems extrusion is way more expensive in Germany or that they charged you $700+ for the cutting/tapping of the extrusion which is just crazy!


Well, there are also six castors and loads of connecting stuff to consider...

I'm using dual lock swivel casters which I suspect would cost more and also using all the 8020 official connectors.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2020, 04:59 PM »
I assembled everything this evening.  From start to finish, it took me about and hour and a half to complete it.  Nothing is torqued to specs yet, and I have to take about half of it apart to install the partitions for the shelf and drawer sections.  In typical German engineering, there were no parts left over.  I dropped one of the frame attachment screws and it rolled under some shelves along the way.  I thought this wouldn't be a problem because there would be a spare screw in the parts bag.  I had to retrieve the screw from under the shelves.

I assembled the workbench so I could verify all of the internal dimensions before I start cutting plywood sheets.  It's a good thing I did, because somewhere in my SketchUp plans I was off by 20mm in three places.  I forgot to account for the center offset of the 40x40mm extrusion.

I was considering not using the center wheels on my tiled floor, but there is no rocking.  The double-locking casters on the corners do a great job and it takes a lot of force to make the empty chassis to slide.  Once it is weighted down with tools and wood panels, it will be more difficult to move.

Offline johnredl

  • Posts: 33
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2020, 07:27 PM »
Did you take any pics of the semi completed bench yet?

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2020, 08:09 PM »
Did you take any pics of the semi completed bench yet?

Well, since you asked, but please disregard the clutter in the basement as well.  It is still a work in progress.   [smile]



Offline j.wendell

  • Posts: 10
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2020, 11:23 AM »
Any updates?

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2020, 02:18 PM »
Over the weekend I found another mistake in my design and ordered more material.  I'm on a different computer now, but when I'm back in my bunker, I'll post an image of the design I made in SketchUp to help with the partitions and drawers.  It was this process where I discovered that I had put the two top cross pieces that support the MDF in the wrong place.  While working on a paper version instead of CAD, I laid out the grid for the holes in the MDF, and then promptly ignored the placement when I designed the workbench in the item24 CAD application.

The two top cross pieces that will support the MDF panel go right through two columns of dog holes, so I have to move them.  this is an easy process and all I need to do is drill 7mm holes in the center of the channel to access the fastener so I can tighten it.  In the process, I decided to add two more cross pieces to support the MDF (more is better?), so I ordered two more pieces of 920mm extrusion and the drill guide so I can accurately drill the holes in the extrusion.  All of that will arrive tomorrow.

I bought the 12mm and 15mm plywood for the partitions, drawer slide support slats, and the three drawers on the end.  I will be using 10mm plywood for the shelf under the MDF panel and will work on the side drawers later.  The 400mm and 500mm full extension drawer slides arrived today, as did the carbide end mill for the router so I can make slot in the extrusion for the clamps.  Now I have to make a template for the router copy ring and test my skills at milling aluminum with a hand router. 

I hope I can do this with the OF 1010, but I have the OF 2200 if the OF 1010 isn't adequate.  I had briefly considered using my router table for this, since I wouldn't need to bother with a template, but don't want to risk getting aluminum shavings in the inverted router.  I am open to suggestions for this if anyone has tips on milling aluminum with a router.  I plan on making slow and shallow cuts to reduce the likelihood that the cutter will be clogged up with aluminum.


In the next couple of days, I will cut and assemble all of the inner partitions, disassemble the workbench so I can enlarge the channel in the ends of the vertical pieces, and reassemble the workbench.

Offline j.wendell

  • Posts: 10
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2020, 08:36 AM »
I'd love to see your sketchup for the drawer design.

How much space did you leave between each partition and how are you planning on building out the plywood to get it flush with the 80/20?

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2020, 11:04 AM »
Here are some screenshots from the SketchUp model.

This image shows the extra 920mm pieces I added to the MDF support.  I also moved them so the extrusion is between the rows of dog holes.




This image shows the 18mm MDF top in place.  All but one of the drawer compartment partitions are made from 15mm plywood that will have a 12mm relief rabbet on the edges that slide into the 40x40mm extrusion.  The inner partitions will have a rabbet on both sides so the partition is centered on the extrusion.  The vertical slats for the inner partitions are 12mm plywood and are 50x550mm.  The slats will make the slide mounting surface recessed about 1mm into the drawer openings, but this is enough space for the moving slide sections to clear the 40x40mm extrusion. 

The exception will be the end partition that will use 12mm plywood with a rabbet on the inside surface only with 12mm vertical plywood slats.  This combination will bring the slide mounting surface about 4mm into the drawer opening.  I am not rabbeting the external side of the partitions that can be seen because I want the edge of the plywood to be completely inside the 8mm channel of the extrusion.

The drawer openings on the sides are 430mm wide and 510mm tall.  Each drawer or slide will be 400mm deep to accommodate the Systainer boxes.  The three drawers on the end are 883mm wide and 500mm deep.  The drawers are 100mm, 150mm, and 212mm high.  I haven't laid out the drawers for the sides yet, because I haven't determined which Systainers or how many smaller equipment and tool drawers I want.

Edit: The drawers are shown without the drawer faces.  When finished, the drawer faces will be nearly flush with the outer surface of the extrusion.





This image shows the front without the drawers. The vertical slats in this image are from 15mm plywood and are 75x620mm.  There are three slats spaced along the partition for the drawer slide attachment screws.  The 15mm slats on the 15mm rabbeted plywood will bring the slide mounting surface about 2mm into the drawer opening on each side.


« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 08:31 AM by MikeGE »

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 2066
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2020, 06:43 AM »
Here's an option for panels. I use two sheets of 12mm (nominal 1/2") laminated together. I cut one sheet to fit the inside dimension of the opening and the other 20mm larger in both directions. Glued up the larger sheet extends 10mm over each edge of the first sheet, creating a simple rabbet on each edge.

I then use a router and pattern bit to trim the rabbet thickness down so it just fits into the slot of the extrusion. This gives me a simple and perfect fit with the face of the panel just slightly proud of the extrusion. Installing drawer slides is then simple.

This really only works for end panels, the offset would be different on each side is used for the intermediate panels.

I can whip up a sketch if anyone is interested.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2020, 08:29 AM »
Richard, I had considered doubling up on the plywood for the partitions, but decided to use the slats instead.  I even found a source for 20mm plywood that would match up with the thickness of the extrusion when doubled.  Unfortunately, it was only available in full sheets larger than the normal 1250x2500mm (4x8 foot) that fit in my truck and there was a five-sheet minimum purchase.

Your suggestion makes installing rack slides easier, while my method requires me to position the slats during the build to fit the slides.  Once built, I cannot change the slides unless then new slides have the same mounting hole pattern as the current slides.  The slats will be glued to the partitions and tacked in place with brads while the glue cures.

The 15mm plywood center partitions are also the support for the 10mm plywood sheet below the MDF surface.  I will attach the plywood sheet to the extrusion at each end with the item24 hardware and two or three countersunk screws into the edge of each partition.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 08:32 AM by MikeGE »

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 2066
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #24 on: October 25, 2020, 07:58 AM »
Richard, I had considered doubling up on the plywood for the partitions, but decided to use the slats instead.  I even found a source for 20mm plywood that would match up with the thickness of the extrusion when doubled.  Unfortunately, it was only available in full sheets larger than the normal 1250x2500mm (4x8 foot) that fit in my truck and there was a five-sheet minimum purchase.

Your suggestion makes installing rack slides easier, while my method requires me to position the slats during the build to fit the slides.  Once built, I cannot change the slides unless then new slides have the same mounting hole pattern as the current slides.  The slats will be glued to the partitions and tacked in place with brads while the glue cures.

The 15mm plywood center partitions are also the support for the 10mm plywood sheet below the MDF surface.  I will attach the plywood sheet to the extrusion at each end with the item24 hardware and two or three countersunk screws into the edge of each partition.

In truth I have only used this in a couple situations where there were no intermediate sections, i.e. just a single bay. Where it really shines is when you bore standard 32mm rows for shelves or drawer glides. This is only really useful in situations where the shelves might be relocated over time.

Your approach is simpler when setting up a cart like the one you are building.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2020, 10:39 AM »
Here is today's update.  I made a router template so I could mill the slots for the Festool clamp and M8 carriage bolt.  The M8 bolt is a perfect fit in the Series 8 channel.

This project is a first for me in many areas, but today is the first time I:
  • Made a router template for copy rings
  • Milled aluminum using a hand router
  • Used my OF 1010 router
I made the template so I could mill two pieces of Series 8 extrusion in the same setup.  Unlike Ryan's design, I started the cutting about 10mm from the end of the extrusion so there were no extra gaps at the points where the extrusion intersects another piece.  The long slot accepts the Festool clamp and the larger hole accepts the M8 carriage bolt.  I used a scrap piece of 12mm plywood so I could recess the screw heads that attach the template to the extrusion.






Here is the finished template showing the slots to be milled and the four recessed holes for the T-track hardware.  I later drilled a 6mm hole between the two large holes so I could align the two pieces of extrusion.





The finished product for the test run.  These are the end pieces that support the MDF panel and I decided to cut access slots in both T-tracks.  I was cautious with the router and made several slow passes to make sure I didn't clog up the cutter.  On the first pair of slots, I made 1mm deep passes, checking the cutter after each pass.  On the second pair of slots, I made 1.5mm passes, checking after each pass.  I'm satisfied with three passes per operation and there was no aluminum buildup on the cutter.






Now that I know the process works, much to my delight, I will take more pictures of the process on the smaller sections.  I have to disassemble the workbench in order to mill the access slots, but I knew I would be doing that when I assembled it.

Offline Imemiter

  • Posts: 203
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2020, 11:54 AM »
That'll do nicely. Smart using the t-slot hardware to clamp the template! 
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Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2020, 03:30 PM »
More images of the routing process.  Here is an image of the bottom of the template.  I attached a strip of plywood as a guide once I had the first pair of extrusions properly aligned.  The seam where the two ends of the extrusion meet can be seen adjacent to the middle screw.






The OF 1010 and an 8mm 4-fluted carbide end mill worked perfectly.  There were three cutting passes and one cleaning pass.  I applied a little paste wax to the template to make the router slide better.






Another pair of vertical support extrusions are done.  In fact, I've finished all of them and broke the edges with a few passes of 320-grit sandpaper.  Now I can assemble the chassis and torque the hardware to the design specification.





Offline mkasdin

  • Posts: 475
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #28 on: October 27, 2020, 06:54 PM »
More images of the routing process.  Here is an image of the bottom of the template.  I attached a strip of plywood as a guide once I had the first pair of extrusions properly aligned.  The seam where the two ends of the extrusion meet can be seen adjacent to the middle screw.



I’m surprised the OF1010 could mill the aluminum. What end mill bit did you use Freud, Whiteside, CMT? Did you use a bushing guide to follow the template?
« Last Edit: October 31, 2020, 04:23 PM by mkasdin »

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #29 on: October 27, 2020, 07:40 PM »
I’m surprised the OF1010 could ill the aluminum. What end mill bit did you use Freud, Whiteside, CMT? Did you use a bushing guide to follow the template?

I used the CNC 8mm end mill in the Amazon.de link and the Festool 484176 13.8mm copy ring.

https://www.amazon.de/-/en/gp/product/B01FFV6SSG/

After zeroing the cutter depth in the template, I made slow passes removing 1mm for each pass on the first set of extrusions.  This went very well, so I increased the removal to about 1.5mm for each pass on the rest of the extrusions.  The material thickness is 5mm, so I set the cutting depth to about 5.5mm for the cleanup pass. 


There were 22 slots cut, and I inspected the cutter flutes after each pass.  I didn't use any lubricant, and one of the flutes had some aluminum buildup in it about midway on one of the passes.  It was easy to clear with the tip of a knife.  The 22nd slot looks just as crisp as the first slot.


If the OF 1010 wasn't up to the job, I had the OF 2200 on standby with a 10mm cutter from the same source.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #30 on: October 31, 2020, 04:01 PM »
Here are the images from this week's progress.  All of the 12mm and 15mm plywood for the partitions is cut and ready for the rabbets and glue-up. 






I used my router table to mill the 10mm rabbet into the edges of each partition.  The Jessem Clear-Cut guides worked surprisingly well in keeping the panel firmly in contact with the fence and table top during the cut.  I didn't have any problem feeding the panels through the cutter.  The three inner partitions have rabbets on the bottom and two sides, but not the top.  The 10mm shelf will ride on the top of these panels.  The side panels and end panel have rabbets on all edges because they fit in the 8mm slots on all sides.  I sanded everything to 150 grit and used Titebond II and brads to hold the vertical slats to the partitions.  After stacking the freshly assembled partitions on the floor, I loaded them up with about 300KG of weight overnight.





The last dry fit to make sure everything fits as designed and locate the outlet boxes for the dual receptacles.  I will take the top section apart so I can remove the partitions for painting.  There will be a cable access groove in the middle of the top edge of each partition so the cable can run down the center of the workbench and attach to the underside of the 10mm shelf.  I will leave a short cable on the end with the receptacle so I can use an extension cord for power.  I also added two more support beams on the top for the MDF panel.  This workbench will be used as an assembly table and I didn't want to risk putting too much load on an unsupported section of the MDF.






Views of the receptacle boxes.  The top drawer slide is well below the bottom of the box.  The back of the box will not interfere with the side drawer panel. 












Closeup view of the front right corner of the workbench showing the number of clamp access slots.  The extrusion is loosely fitted, but will be better aligned during the final assembly.





Tonight I start the first of two coats of primer for the partitions.  The color coat will be light gray.

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Offline RightAngleDesign

  • Posts: 49
  • Your best work just got easier®.
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #31 on: October 31, 2020, 08:14 PM »
Fantastic!
Kapex, Domino, multiple sanders, 1400, LR32, TS55

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #32 on: November 09, 2020, 06:38 PM »
This is a quick update for 9 November 2020.  The partitions are painted, some drawer slides installed, and final assembly is underway.


The first coat of light gray paint.  There are two coats of primer on all surfaces.  All external surfaces, those that can be clearly seen, have two coats of light gray paint, with sanding between the primer and first coat.  All internal surfaces have one coat of gray.






I changed my mind on the end drawers.  Originally, I had a 100mm, 150mm, and 212mm full-width drawer on the end.  After inventorying the tools I know I will be putting in these drawers, I changed the design to three 100mm drawers and a 150mm drawer on the bottom.  I didn't have enough 500mm full-extension slides, so I ordered more today.  I pre-drilled the holes for mounting the slides when they come in this week.





With the partitions installed, next comes the electrical distribution.  There are three duplex outlets and a junction box in the first open bay if another outlet is needed.  This is on today's menu, but I forgot to put the junction box and Wago connectors on the table.





The electrical distribution is installed and tested.  When the catch shelf is installed, I'll dress up the cable between partitions and attach it to the bottom of the shelf.











The catch shelf and MDF supports are installed.









The 19mm black Valchromat MDF panel is in place, but not attached.  Each Systainer bay has the lower drawer slides installed.  I'll install the rest as I decide what will go in each bay.  Some of the bays will have small tool and supply drawers at the top, just below the catch shelf.






Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #33 on: November 10, 2020, 05:16 PM »
Update for 10 November.  Dog holes drilled and chamfered in MDF top.  The UJK Parf Guide System Mk2 made this very easy, but time consuming.  I had all of the 3mm pilot holes drilled in just under an hour, but it took just over two hours to drill the 20mm holes, chamfer the holes on both surfaces, and lightly sand the top surface. 

The Valchromat is brittle, and almost every hole had breakout on the bottom from the 20mm cutter.  I didn't notice this with normal MDF.  The cutter made nice crisp edges on the entry surface, so no complaints. The UJK chamfer tool dressed up the edges.    It would be nice if the tool could be used with a variable speed drill instead of by hand. 

After finishing the holes, I checked the accuracy in ten places around the surface with four dogs and my TSO MTR-18 Triangle.  As best as I can tell, everything is square.

If anyone has used Valchromat before, I am open to suggestions on how to treat the surface.  While I had the MDF flipped over cleaning the breakout, I tried a light coat of furniture wax in one corner, but the results were splotchy and I could not even it out.  The surface was very smooth, but looks horrible.  I have some offcuts for experimenting.

The 500mm slides came in this morning, so I installed the missing pair.  When I have time this week, I'll start on the drawers, as well as the sliding shelves for the Systainers.

Upcoming tasks include milling the top for the sacrificial HDPE strip, cutting the strips, chamfering the edge of the table, and attaching the Dash-Board Guide Rail kit and the FS 1400/2 Guide Rail.




Offline Imemiter

  • Posts: 203
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #34 on: November 11, 2020, 12:16 AM »
Gorgeous table so far. Thanks for bringing us along on the journey!

I saw an outfeed/assembly bench someone had made out of "Topan," which looks similar to your top. He'd finished it in BLO and three coats of Shellac. Had a nice jet black matte look. Cool product.
CSX T18+3 TID18 HKC55 OSC18 OS400 OF1010 LR32 DF700 RAS115 DTS400 ETC125 CTSys CTMidi CT-VA

Offline Dusty.Tools

  • Retailer
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  • Posts: 288
    • Dusty.Tools
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2020, 12:39 AM »
Awesome, very nice!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
@dusty.tools

Offline Roachmill

  • Posts: 302
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #36 on: November 11, 2020, 02:23 AM »
Wow, it's looking great! I can't help on the blowout - short of drilling holes through from both sides.

Having chamfered a few, much smaller, tops by hand with the UJK chamfering tool... I now do that with a carefully set cordless router. It's not that much faster, but it saves the wrists!

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #37 on: November 12, 2020, 06:31 PM »
I made a slight correction to the table surface last night while I was marking the holes for the screws and T-nuts.  While the dog hole grid is accurate, the baseline I used for the first ten holes was off by about 0.5mm from the first to the tenth hole...or the width of my pencil mark that I used for the line.  This meant the overall difference was about 1mm over the 20 holes along the long side of the table.  As a result, the 10x20 grid of holes was very slightly skewed on the Valchromat board.

I fixed this by trimming the four edges of the board to give a 2mm offset from the outer edge of the aluminum extrusion using the dog holes as the reference.  If I do this again, I will use a marking knife to establish the baseline for the first row of pilot holes.

There are eight M6x25mm screws, with 18mm flat washers, holding the top to the frame.  After centering the freshly-trimmed board on the frame and clamping it in place, I marked the location for each screw 20mm in from the edge of the aluminum.  This is the center of the channel.  I used a 2mm drill to make a pilot hole in the Valchromat and an 18mm Forstner cutter for the screws and washers.  Then I finished with a 6.5mm drill for the through hole for the screw.  I made a dimple in the bottom of the channel with the 6.5mm drill so I could identify the location for each of the T-nuts.





The 30x60 extrusion for the fence arrived this morning.  When I ordered the extrusion, I had not decided where I was going to put the guide rail, so I ordered a 2-meter section and will use the excess on another fence project.  After cutting the extrusion to length, I trimmed the end of the 30x60mm fence so it fits under the FS 1400/2 guide rail.  There is 11mm of extrusion remaining on the trimmed section, and I didn't want to cut it lower and risk breaking it off.  The thinnest plywood I cut is 12mm, so this easily fits under the guide rail when the height is set.

I used a Trend CSB/AP30584 tungsten carbide tipped blade to cut the aluminum extrusion.  The 84-tooth blade is 305mm in diameter with a 30mm arbor hole.  This blade fits my Minimax SC2 Classic table saw and Dewalt DWS780 miter saw.  The extrusion was very easy to cut on both saws.  Breaking the edges and cleaning up the corner took more time than making both cuts with the saws.





The extruded drawer pulls also arrived this morning, and these were an after-thought of my design.  The drawer pulls are 40mm deep and must be slightly recessed from the front edge of the frame in order for me to be able to clamp boards to the sides.  I have to move the drawer slides back 15mm to allow for the clearance after I attach the drawer fronts.  This will be an easy task since some of the holes in the slide aligns with existing holes in the partition after I move them.

Offline John Huh

  • Posts: 39
    • Tidbits
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #38 on: November 12, 2020, 06:40 PM »
Wow.. spectacular!

I wonder where I can get a similar top in the states...

Offline GigaWatt

  • Posts: 38
  • Life long woodworker & retired Electrical Engineer
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #39 on: November 13, 2020, 11:03 AM »
Mike, this is a fantastic build! As a retired engineer, I realize all of the research and planning you put into this project. I did a similar build with 80-20 for my cnc router.

I'm designing a similar MFT and will also use the DashBoard Guide Rail Bracket Set. I have a question, if you could possible do some measuring for me. How much of the Festool Rail does the hinge side of the bracket and the opposite support bracket use. I'm plan on sizing the width of my table to take advantage of the 42" (FS 1080/2) rail.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #40 on: November 18, 2020, 08:47 PM »
Update for 19 November 2020.

I finally found the time to build the drawers for the end section.  Each drawer is 883mm wide and 500mm deep and made from 15m plywood.  The drawer fronts are made from 12mm plywood.  Three of the drawers are 100mm tall, and the fourth drawer is 150mm tall.  The drawer pulls are from the same vendor as the extrusion, and the drawers are recessed so the handles do not extend past the end of the frame.





Here are the contents of the first drawer.  I used Kaizen foam for the lining of each drawer, and cut around each of the tools.





Contents of the second drawer.  The Woodpeckers kit for the Domino came in a Systainer, and I didn't see any point in cutting Kazien for the contents, so I trimmed the Kaizen around the foam insert and declared victory.






Even with the shortcut of using the Woodpeckers insert, this drawer took the most time to prepare because of the angle clamps.





Contents of the third drawer.  The longest guide rails for the TSO parallel guide kit are too big for the drawer, so they are on the catch tray.





The fourth drawer waiting on me to decide what to put in it.






The fence, FS 1400/2, and the long TSO guide rails fit on the catch tray when not in use.




My next project was to make the sliding trays for the Systainer cases.  I am using 19mm plywood from scraps, and these will be mounted to the 400mm full extension slides along the sides of the workbench.  Since I don't have a CNC machine (yet), I will use an 8mm cutter and the 11mm copy ring on the OF 1010 router

This is the routing template I used to make the 8mm deep recesses for the Systainer feet.  The plywood cleats are glued to the 12mm MDF (more scrap) to ensure each of the 405x400mm trays are similar.  Since I didn't want to be bothered with chiseling out all of the corners, I extended the router bit to ensure the corner of the Systainer feet had clearance. 




The first test shelf is done, and the Systainer fits perfectly.





Twenty Systainer trays ready for sanding and painting.  I doubt I will ever use all twenty, but since I had the template and a rhythm going, I used up most of my 19mm offcuts that have been gathering dust for a year.  I made three trays for the VAC SYS Systainers.  These are the original version and have a different feet layout.




Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #41 on: November 18, 2020, 09:56 PM »
I forgot to add...

I was searching for methods to treat the surface of the Valchromat, since it won't absorb 15 coats of thinned wipe-on poly.  Most of the methods I found were using hard wax oil, so I bought a can to test it on a small piece.

I used this offcut to test the UJK Parf MK2 system, and thought it would be a good candidate to test the oil.  It has ten 20mm dog holes and one 18mm recess I made with a Forstner cutter to check the depth needed for the mounting screws and washers.  I made two shallow saw cuts across the board to divide it into three sections.  In addition to the oil, I wanted to try different sanding finishes.

The top section in this photo, with three dog holes and the Forstner recess, was not sanded.  The middle section, with four dog holes, was sanded with P150.  The bottom section, with three dog holes, was sanded with P150, P220, and P400.  I then applied a thin coat of the wax and let it soak in for about ten minutes.  After wiping off the excess, I let it dry overnight.  I then added a second thin coat and wiped off the excess after about ten minutes.  This is how the board looked about four hours after the second coat.




I can tell the difference between the three areas, and the P400 finish is the winner. 

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3039
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #42 on: November 18, 2020, 11:14 PM »
You have done an admirable job on the design  and build.  Very clean and I really like the color choices.  Particularly like the electrical distribution!

I’m sure it will serve you well for many years ahead.

Thanks for the detailed walk through of the build and thinking.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #43 on: November 19, 2020, 06:33 AM »
Mike, this is a fantastic build! As a retired engineer, I realize all of the research and planning you put into this project. I did a similar build with 80-20 for my cnc router.

I'm designing a similar MFT and will also use the DashBoard Guide Rail Bracket Set. I have a question, if you could possible do some measuring for me. How much of the Festool Rail does the hinge side of the bracket and the opposite support bracket use. I'm plan on sizing the width of my table to take advantage of the 42" (FS 1080/2) rail.
@GigaWatt , Thank you, and I apologize for missing your question.  All measurements are from the surface of the extrusion.

The hinge side requires 185mm and the pin side requires 75mm to ensure the guide rail is properly supported.  If you want to just clear the pin, the rail needs 45mm of overhang.  I think it would be an easy task to make a pin plate that attaches to the surface of the workbench and uses two or more dog holes as a reference.  Maybe this is something @RightAngleDesign could offer.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #44 on: November 19, 2020, 06:36 AM »
You have done an admirable job on the design  and build.  Very clean and I really like the color choices.  Particularly like the electrical distribution!

I’m sure it will serve you well for many years ahead.

Thanks for the detailed walk through of the build and thinking.

Thank you!  I learned from watching the videos by @AtomicRyan and applying his lessons learned.

Offline GigaWatt

  • Posts: 38
  • Life long woodworker & retired Electrical Engineer
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #45 on: November 19, 2020, 10:41 AM »
Mike, this is a fantastic build! As a retired engineer, I realize all of the research and planning you put into this project. I did a similar build with 80-20 for my cnc router.

I'm designing a similar MFT and will also use the DashBoard Guide Rail Bracket Set. I have a question, if you could possible do some measuring for me. How much of the Festool Rail does the hinge side of the bracket and the opposite support bracket use. I'm plan on sizing the width of my table to take advantage of the 42" (FS 1080/2) rail.
@GigaWatt , Thank you, and I apologize for missing your question.  All measurements are from the surface of the extrusion.

The hinge side requires 185mm and the pin side requires 75mm to ensure the guide rail is properly supported.  If you want to just clear the pin, the rail needs 45mm of overhang.  I think it would be an easy task to make a pin plate that attaches to the surface of the workbench and uses two or more dog holes as a reference.  Maybe this is something @RightAngleDesign could offer.

Thanks for your reply. I have the equipment ordered awaiting shipment. Your measurements will allow me to go ahead with work on my MFT. I really like your drawers for the Woodpeckers & TSO tools. I need to build something similar to organize and protect mine.

Offline nicholam77

  • Posts: 82
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #46 on: November 19, 2020, 12:06 PM »
This is such a beautiful bench build! The layout in that TSO drawer is divine.

A few of questions for you on your fence:

1) With the aluminum blade did you need to use any lubrication, and if so, what? I haven't cut metal much before but want to trim my extrusion in the same manner.

2) Any reason why you chose a 30x60 extrusion? I did the same but am now realizing 25x50 or 20x40 would fit some of the flag stops that are out there whereas 30x60 does not.

3) On that note... what are you plans for a stop block?

Thanks!
CT15 | ETS 125 REQ

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #47 on: November 19, 2020, 12:54 PM »
This is such a beautiful bench build! The layout in that TSO drawer is divine.

Thank you!
A few of questions for you on your fence:

1) With the aluminum blade did you need to use any lubrication, and if so, what? I haven't cut metal much before but want to trim my extrusion in the same manner.

I didn't use any lubricant.  I made the cut slowly and didn't force the material through the table saw, or the miter saw through the material.


2) Any reason why you chose a 30x60 extrusion? I did the same but am now realizing 25x50 or 20x40 would fit some of the flag stops that are out there whereas 30x60 does not.

In Germany, I can't find 25x50 or 20x40 extrusion.  These sizes appear to be common in North America, but the vendors I checked here didn't carry them.  The closest I could find was 30x60.


3) On that note... what are you plans for a stop block?

Thanks!

I bought the Fence Dogs for the fence from Benchdogs, and also bought the Flag Stop M6 that I thought would work...and it would if I had 20x40 extrusion.  The T-nut and the 3D-printed part of the flag stop fits the slot in the 30x60 extrusion, but the flag is too small.  I will either make a new flag or will use the 3D-printed part as the stop block.  I might also make a stop block from offcuts.

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 335
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #48 on: November 19, 2020, 04:32 PM »
@MikeGE : I realise it is a bit too late for it now, but motedis.de does have 2040 profiles. See for example this one.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #49 on: November 19, 2020, 05:13 PM »
@MikeGE : I realise it is a bit too late for it now, but motedis.de does have 2040 profiles. See for example this one.

@hdv, thank you!  It's not too late for the next project.  I have a friend who is designing a table and wants to use aluminum extrusion for the frame.  He prefers to machine his own lengths, so I'll pass this site to him.

Offline nicholam77

  • Posts: 82
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #50 on: November 19, 2020, 05:52 PM »
Thanks for the responses! Makes sense... I ended up with 30x60 just to have a beefier fence, didn't really research the flag stops until after I bought it. Oh well. Nice to know the Benchdogs one fits, perhaps I will get one and make my own 'flag' as well. Thanks!
CT15 | ETS 125 REQ

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 335
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #51 on: November 20, 2020, 06:32 AM »
You're welcome. My experiences with them (Motedis) are good, but delivery often takes a longish time. And during the pandemic some products were not always in stock. Other than than no trouble whatsoever.

Offline BeGood

  • Posts: 4
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #52 on: November 28, 2020, 06:22 PM »
Hi Mike,

Item, Valchromate, TSO, Dash-board Guide Rail, Kaizen foam, an Incra System - everything, not just your work bench, looks top notch.  Just a couple of questions:

1. fence system
what made you decide to go for the fence dog solution instead of, say, the solution of dash-board?

2. protection of the top
since you´ve invested a lot of time and money in your valchromate top I suppose you are not planning to have it replace soon due to wear and tear but instead to keep it as long as possible. I was therefore wondering how you will protect the top when making cuts?

3. stabilising the guide rail
when cutting thicker material how are you going to support your guide rail underneath to avoid any potential imbalances such as wobble?

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #53 on: November 28, 2020, 06:25 PM »
Update for 28 November.

The end is in sight.  I made a lot of progress since the last update, and in the next couple of days, the workbench will be fully operational.

I made pull-out trays for the Festool Systainers that I wanted in the workbench.  The rest will stay in the main shop until needed.  The trays are made from 19mm plywood that was left over from previous projects, so I got a bit carried away and cut enough for 20 trays.  Three are for the original Systainer footprint, and the rest are for the Systainer I have.

Since I don't have a CNC machine (yet), I had to make all of the cutouts for the Systainer feet by hand using the OF 1010, copy ring, and 6mm cutter.   I didn't want to chisel out the corners, so I extended the corners with the routing template.  After all, no one is going to see them and it is a workbench.





I though I took a photo of the other template, but if I did, I can't find it.  Here are the finished trays ready to be sanded, sealed, and painted.




Some of the painted trays.  In the end, I only used two of the original Systainer trays and ten of the new Systainer trays.  Lesson learned is to layout the trays first, then cut the plywood.  It was nice to actually use the workbench to make the workbench.  The VAC SYS is such a great tool for holding pieces for sanding and painting.






I didn't take any photos of installing the drawer slides for the trays, but I determined how high I wanted the slides and cut a wide board for each of the different heights.  The bottom slides were already in place when I built the partitions, so I only needed to install six new trays.  I think there were four different heights for the six trays.  I also made and installed two drawers to fill in the gaps at the top of two bays.  I'll include photos of the bays and drawers in the final build post.

And now comes the part I have been dreading.  I need to cut a 5mm deep slot in the top of the Valchromat to hold the sacrificial HDPE strip.  I determined the location for the strip based on where the LS 1400/2 Guide Rail meets the top.  The edge is off center of a row of dog holes, so I measured the area to cut so it is symmetrical over the holes.  This way, I can reverse the strip when it is used up and have a fresh surface for cutting.

Here is a photo showing the 6mm plywood strips I used as guides for the OF 1010.  The blue painter's tape is an attempt to control breakout when I start cutting the Valchromat.  It worked great.  I only have two copy rings for the router, so the largest cutter I could use was 8mm.  I had to make several passes to remove the 61.5mm of material to a depth of 5mm.





And now the cutting starts.  After the first edge cuts, I removed the blue tape as it wasn't needed for the rest of the cutting.  I could not have done this in the basement with my previous Bosch GOF 1600 CE router.  I would have needed extraction fans to clear the room from the fine dust from the Valchromat, but the Festool system is the best!





Done!  The edges are crisp and the width is uniform along the length of the cut.  I had a small piece of the HDPE to check the progress of the cutting.




One happy 61.5mm wide HDPE strip.




Five happy replacements.




The final preparation of the top.  I sanded this with P150, P220, and P400 to prepare the top for the hard wax oil.





The first of two coats is on and drying.  I put blue tape around the perimeter of the aluminum extrusion and on the screws that hold the top to the extrusion.  I don't want the oil to get on the screws or extrusion.  It took 28 minutes from start to finish for the top and six minutes for the edge.  When I finished the last section of the top, I wiped off the excess oil on the first half of the table top.  Then I applied the oil to the edges.  When I finished the edges, I wiped off the excess from the other half of the top.  Tomorrow afternoon, I'll apply the second coat of hard wax oil.  When it is dry, I'll attach the guide rail brackets and the workbench will be complete.






Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #54 on: November 28, 2020, 06:44 PM »
Hi Mike,

Item, Valchromate, TSO, Dash-board Guide Rail, Kaizen foam, an Incra System - everything, not just your work bench, looks top notch.  Just a couple of questions:

1. fence system
what made you decide to go for the fence dog solution instead of, say, the solution of dash-board?

2. protection of the top
since you´ve invested a lot of time and money in your valchromate top I suppose you are not planning to have it replace soon due to wear and tear but instead to keep it as long as possible. I was therefore wondering how you will protect the top when making cuts?

3. stabilising the guide rail
when cutting thicker material how are you going to support your guide rail underneath to avoid any potential imbalances such as wobble?


Thank you for the kind words!!!

I was typing my latest update when you posted this. 

1.  I don't know anything about the Dash-Board fence, but I just checked his website, and there are no photos of it. 

2.  In today's update, you will see the HDPE sacrificial strips I made for the top.  I routed a slot in the top to accept the strip, and it fits perfectly.  The cutting path is off-center to the strip, so when it is chewed up, I can flip it around and use the section that was under the guide rail.  When that section is chewed up, I have five more spare strips.

3.  I'm not sure I understand this question.  However, if you are asking how the stable the guide rail will be for thick cuts, the Dash-Board guide rail bracket I have supports the guide rail securely on both ends.  It has more elevation than my TS-55 or TS-75 can cut.

If the board is too thick for the track saws on the workbench, I have a Minimax SC2 Classic slider saw in the other part of my shop for that.

« Last Edit: November 28, 2020, 06:46 PM by MikeGE »

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 3039
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #55 on: November 28, 2020, 06:45 PM »
Great looking bench!  Thanks for the detailed photos and process.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #56 on: November 28, 2020, 06:47 PM »
Great looking bench!  Thanks for the detailed photos and process.

Thank you!  My wife is especially eager for it to be completed so I can start on her bookshelves.

Offline BeGood

  • Posts: 4
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #57 on: November 29, 2020, 02:42 PM »
great to see some bright colour being added as a perfect, complementary contrast to the greyish rest - very good taste ;-)

to be a bit more precise in terms of my previous questions:

1. fence system by dash-board
this is what i was thinking of:


2. protection of the top
the sacrificial strip is definitely a practical solution for 90 degree cuts. but how about angled cuts?

3. making thicker cuts
your bench has a width of 100cm. if you cut thick wood which is much narrower than 100cm i imagine that the guide rail will most likely bend while cutting due to the weight of the track saw and lack of support from underneath. therefore i was wondering how you are going to solve those situations.

ps.: as for ordering and getting stuff shipped from dash-board as an international client like you did - how did it work in your case?


Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #58 on: November 29, 2020, 04:27 PM »
great to see some bright colour being added as a perfect, complementary contrast to the greyish rest - very good taste ;-)

to be a bit more precise in terms of my previous questions:

1. fence system by dash-board
this is what i was thinking of:


2. protection of the top
the sacrificial strip is definitely a practical solution for 90 degree cuts. but how about angled cuts?

3. making thicker cuts
your bench has a width of 100cm. if you cut thick wood which is much narrower than 100cm i imagine that the guide rail will most likely bend while cutting due to the weight of the track saw and lack of support from underneath. therefore i was wondering how you are going to solve those situations.

ps.: as for ordering and getting stuff shipped from dash-board as an international client like you did - how did it work in your case?

Thanks for including the video!

1.  I didn't know about his fence, but think it would have been too large to mail through the USPS.  The fence flip stops look great, but I don't know if they will work on my 60x30mm fence.  I took a chance on the Benchdogs fence flip stop, but it didn't work out.  The metal flag that flips up and down was made to work with smaller extrusion.  However, the 3D-printed slide fits in the 6mm slot perfectly, so I can probably make a flag with some 3mm steel that will work with my fence.

2.  I have two half sheets (2500x625mm) and assorted sections of 12mm OSB I use for sacrificial backing board when I'm cutting on something I don't want to damage.  However, depending on how wide the piece being cut is, it might be easier to angle the wood and keep the guide rail perpendicular to the table.

3.  Thanks for explaining.  For narrow pieces, I bring the fence towards the center of the table.  I attached four slotted M6 Fence Dogs to the fence, so they go where the fence goes.  The Dash-Board rail brackets still support the guide rail at the ends, but the piece I'm cutting is now about mid-span of the guide rail.  I doubt it will sag even if I stand on it.   [smile]

Concerning the shipping, when I ordered all of my tools from U.S. vendors, I was still a U.S. Government employee with access to the USPS through the military postal system.  I recently retired and no longer have access, so now I am at the mercy of international shipping from U.S. vendors. 

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #59 on: November 30, 2020, 12:23 PM »
Update for 30 November 2020.

Done!  The second coat of hard wax oil is dry and I started fitting the Dash-Board Guide Rail Brackets, fence, and tidying up the workbench.

I'm not sure why this photo has a yellow cast to it, but here is the finished top with the Dash-Board guides loosely placed.




The tour begins from the working side.  In the Systainer trays, I have the VAC-SYS, PS-300 Jigsaw, TS-55 Track Saw, ETS EC 150 Sander, and OF 1010 router.






In the 100mm high drawer above the sander, I have the bench dogs.





On the end, is the cable storage for the power cord.  I might use the open space to attach brackets for the clamps.




Continuing around to the far side, I have the DF-500 Domino and Domino bin, RO-150 Sander, ZS-OF-2200M Kit, RO-90 Sander, and OF-2200 Router.  The 150mm high drawer above the Domino is empty.





The first accessory fixture for the workbench.  What could it be?  The T-nuts in this photo have grub screws that allow them to be locked into position.  This will come in handy.





The bottom of the SE1 begged for modification, so I threaded the four holes in the corner for M10.




The plate is temporarily positioned, and in doing so I found I had misjudged the offset required for the Dash-Board bracket.  No problem...drill another hole for the bottom knob and we will not mention this.  Ever.




I also used an offcut of the 5mm HDPE to make a temporary stop block for the tray.  This really needs to be about 15mm thick, but will work for now until I can cut a piece of plywood to fit.




The SE1 is attached to the plate using the M10 countersunk screws.  The clips that hold the knobs captive are also installed.




The SE1 is in place and ready for use.  The quick disconnect hose fittings I ordered will arrive this week.  I will make shorter hoses for use in the shop and put the longer hoses back in the Systainer for use outside the shop.




Here is how the vacuum pump is powered.  I added a three-outlet to the partition behind the pump, so it remains plugged in all the time.  I unplug it from the front when not in use to prevent damage to the plug.




The end.  For now.

Offline nicholam77

  • Posts: 82
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #60 on: November 30, 2020, 04:33 PM »
Looks awesome Mike! What a bench!  [big grin]

In the 100mm high drawer above the sander, I have the bench dogs.



^^I really need to do something like this for small bits.
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Offline 08G8V8

  • Posts: 143
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #61 on: December 12, 2020, 01:00 PM »


The bottom of the SE1 begged for modification, so I threaded the four holes in the corner for M10.






Mike, it looks like you threaded the (4) spots on the bottom that don't go through the base, is that correct? 

I just got my VAC SYS Set from the Festool Recon site and looking to make a similar mount for the 2 heads.  Also ordered some hose and fittings to clean up the lines with quick disconnects similar to your setup.

Also, how thick is the Kaizan foam you used for your drawers?

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #62 on: December 12, 2020, 03:18 PM »

Mike, it looks like you threaded the (4) spots on the bottom that don't go through the base, is that correct? 

I just got my VAC SYS Set from the Festool Recon site and looking to make a similar mount for the 2 heads.  Also ordered some hose and fittings to clean up the lines with quick disconnects similar to your setup.

Also, how thick is the Kaizan foam you used for your drawers?

Yes, I threaded the four spots that don't go through the base with a set of M10x1.5 taps.  I drilled them first with the 8.5mm drill to make sure they were the correct diameter for the tap.  I might have been able to tap them without drilling, but since I had the drill with the taps, I made sure.

I started with the taper tap, then the plug tap, followed by the bottoming tap.  McMaster-Carr sells these taps as a set.

The Kaizen foam for all of the drawers is 30mm and is the thinnest foam I had on hand.  The foam in the Woodpeckers drawers are solid black, but the foam in the TSO drawer has the white center.  I used this since it makes it easier to find the small hex keys, as well as tell when a small part is missing.

One thing I forgot to do before I cut the hoses on my VAC SYS was to check how long it takes for the vacuum to leak down after the pump is turned off.  I can't remember if the SE1 held a vacuum for a long time, but now it leaks down to the point where it won't hold a small board in the vertical position for more than ten seconds after the pump is turned off.  This is not an issue when the pump is operating, as it pulls the same vacuum as before, but I was curious.  If you think about it, would you check this before you cut your lines and put the new connectors on and post the time here?

Offline 08G8V8

  • Posts: 143
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #63 on: December 12, 2020, 03:39 PM »
Thanks for the info.  I just placed an order with McMaster yesterday for some of the fittings.  I went with the quick connect someone posted in the Vacsys hose threads from Lowes. I will look into tapping these holes.  I will see how these cheaper fittings work and change to the European style quick connects from McMaster if needed.

I bought a couple sheets of 20mm foam from Fastcap awhile back, but think a thicker foam would be better, so I will look at the 30mm and 57mm they sell. They raised the price considerably, but if you buy a kit of 8 sheets of 30mm or 5 sheets of 57mm the price is reasonable per sheet.

I will do some tests after I get my units mounted, and then with the modified lines and report back.

 


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Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #64 on: December 12, 2020, 03:57 PM »
Thanks for the info.  I just placed an order with McMaster yesterday for some of the fittings.  I went with the quick connect someone posted in the Vacsys hose threads from Lowes. I will look into tapping these holes.  I will see how these cheaper fittings work and change to the European style quick connects from McMaster if needed.

I bought a couple sheets of 20mm foam from Fastcap awhile back, but think a thicker foam would be better, so I will look at the 30mm and 57mm they sell. They raised the price considerably, but if you buy a kit of 8 sheets of 30mm or 5 sheets of 57mm the price is reasonable per sheet.

I will do some tests after I get my units mounted, and then with the modified lines and report back.

 


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I used the European fittings from PCL because...well, I live in Europe.  [big grin]   I'd buy fittings to match the hoses and equipment for your area.  I had a few air nailers that I bought from Harbor Freight and brought with me.  I had to change the fittings on the nailers because they wouldn't mate with the European hose fittings.  Fortunately, they use the same pipe thread dimensions here for water and air lines.

If I had some 20mm Kaizen, I would have used it.  I think it would have worked fine for the Woodpeckers and TSO drawers in my workbench.  Other than the angle clamps, I didn't need to remove more than a few layers of the Kaizen to lock in the tools.

Offline 08G8V8

  • Posts: 143
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #65 on: December 12, 2020, 04:15 PM »
I bought the threaded fittings from McMaster in order to get the BSPP threads to match the Festool fittings, as I doubt I can source those locally. I bought 1 of the sets from Lowes and it attaches to the Festool male plugs and the plug dimensions on the Festool plugs match the plug dimensions that come in the Lowes kit.  Will see how it works before I have to shell out the $$ for the European style quick connects.


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Offline BeGood

  • Posts: 4
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #66 on: December 20, 2020, 02:04 PM »
Quote
I used the European fittings from PCL because...well, I live in Europe.  [big grin] 

well well, it looks like your beloved wife must be very proud of you - not just because of your obvious striving and degree of perfection, but also your very tidyness compared to the average diy guy when looking at your posted images.

so, lucky lucky german wife she is, in particular when i think of all the wonderful nice christmas gifts you are able to create for her now... 8)

in terms of your project a couple of more questions have come to mind:

- who and what is pcl as i don´t know anything about it so far?
- how would you describe valchromate, its properties and your experience so far in comparison to mdf?
- bench dogs: i have noticed that you seem to use 2 different benchdog systems: the one from benchdogs, and the other one from ujk. what´s the reason for this?
- and the last one for today: in hindsight what would you differently with your workbench project ? in terms of eg. design/ construction of the bench, work order, parts being used, work flow etc.

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 252
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #67 on: December 20, 2020, 04:37 PM »
Quote
I used the European fittings from PCL because...well, I live in Europe.  [big grin] 

well well, it looks like your beloved wife must be very proud of you - not just because of your obvious striving and degree of perfection, but also your very tidyness compared to the average diy guy when looking at your posted images.

so, lucky lucky german wife she is, in particular when i think of all the wonderful nice christmas gifts you are able to create for her now... 8)

in terms of your project a couple of more questions have come to mind:

- who and what is pcl as i don´t know anything about it so far?
- how would you describe valchromate, its properties and your experience so far in comparison to mdf?
- bench dogs: i have noticed that you seem to use 2 different benchdog systems: the one from benchdogs, and the other one from ujk. what´s the reason for this?
- and the last one for today: in hindsight what would you differently with your workbench project ? in terms of eg. design/ construction of the bench, work order, parts being used, work flow etc.

Thank you!  The cleanliness is a byproduct of a my military experience.  Every tool cleaned and stored when not needed, and the work area cleared.  This is now second nature.

1.  What is PCL?  Pneumatic Components Ltd. is a UK company that specializes in air lines and air line fittings.  It is one of many sources, but one that @scholar recommended. 

2.  Valchromat.  This is a product originally from Portugal (I think), and it similar to moisture resistant MDF.  However, it is a lot easier to work with than MDF, machines well (except for the blowouts from the 20mm cutter), and is easy on cutting edges.  It is more expensive than MDF and can only be purchased in full sheets here, but is available in about a dozen colors.  If I want MDF, I can buy cut to order pieces from the local hardware store, but the thickest MDF stocked is 18mm.  I cannot buy MRMDF, but can special order it wiht a four-week lead time.  After working with Valchromat, I won't consider using anything else for a workbench top.

3.  Benchdogs.  I bought the UJK bench dogs during one of the sales at Axminster in the UK.  I bought the Bench Dogs version for the fence because they were the only version I could find that had slots that would accept the hardware for the fence T-track.

4.  What would I do differently?  I would think out the design a bit more before ordering the aluminum extrusion and add the extra horizontal support pieces and drawer pulls to the original design.  This would have saved me over €300 in extra shipping and the drill jig since the holes would be part of the CNC design.  I might consider making the workbench 2.5 meters long instead of 2 meters, but I'll have to use my workbench for a while to see if I have any "I wish I had that extra half meter" moments.  This would give me an additional tool or drawer storage bay on each side.  However, this would also add more weight to the workbench...and it is a beast now.  I would also consider use the lighter version of the extrusion for all of the 40x40mm sections except for the two 2-meter sections at the bottom.  I don't think there is anything to be gained by using the solid version when flexing is not an issue.  Otherwise, I am very happy with the workbench as is.

Offline BeGood

  • Posts: 4
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #68 on: December 21, 2020, 02:15 PM »
from your project also including your pics and what you´ve written so far i believe many of us here can learn quite a bit from you and your expertise - eg. how you approach a quite complex project, but also in terms of your military discipline and which helps a lot in the daily work:

when you stick to tidiness and made it a strict rule to follow on a daily base i suppose you always know where things are during a project. as such it makes you waste less time, energy and frustration in terms of this very well known searching, searching and searching for tools etc. ;)

in terms of your mentioned christmas wish of having just this extra half meter may i suggest a simple idea and which hopefully also plays into your strategic mind set:

why not add a tool tray, maybe a routed box to the far end of your workbench and where you´ve got the 2 sockets - a flexible box that you simply can click on to your extrusion rail whilst making use of the t-slot and which you can take off at any time...

the additional benefit might be that you would have a proper excuse in the run up for christmas - i mean in case you´ve run out of ideas (or time) in terms of making christmas presents for your beloved wife and that show your ongoing strong affection for her (and not just for the workbench)...

by the way, what do you think of making a tasteful lovely little wooden box maybe also including decorative brass inlays and made of exotic wooden material (and maybe even incensed with an irresistible fragrance to the taste of your wife) and which has enclosed this teeny weeny sparkling $1,000,000 diamond bracelet or ring or necklace or... and which is, well, every girls´ best friend? well, if i remember correctly...

anyway, as a mentioned just an idea [smile]


Offline 08G8V8

  • Posts: 143
Re: Medium BF/MFT Workbench Build
« Reply #69 on: December 30, 2020, 02:07 PM »

Mike, it looks like you threaded the (4) spots on the bottom that don't go through the base, is that correct? 

I just got my VAC SYS Set from the Festool Recon site and looking to make a similar mount for the 2 heads.  Also ordered some hose and fittings to clean up the lines with quick disconnects similar to your setup.

Also, how thick is the Kaizan foam you used for your drawers?


One thing I forgot to do before I cut the hoses on my VAC SYS was to check how long it takes for the vacuum to leak down after the pump is turned off.  I can't remember if the SE1 held a vacuum for a long time, but now it leaks down to the point where it won't hold a small board in the vertical position for more than ten seconds after the pump is turned off.  This is not an issue when the pump is operating, as it pulls the same vacuum as before, but I was curious.  If you think about it, would you check this before you cut your lines and put the new connectors on and post the time here?


I haven’t changed my lines over yet, but I just tested the holding time of a 22”x10” piece of 3/4” plywood, in the vertical position with the largest diameter pod that comes with the SE1 and it held for about 5 minutes before it loses hold.  I tested 2 times and both were around 5 minutes.

Much longer than your 10 seconds. I guess I will see what I get when I swap the lines.


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