Author Topic: Another take to distributing DC in your shop  (Read 1360 times)

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Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 478
Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« on: February 19, 2020, 04:16 PM »
Just stumbled over this video, there’s definitely more takes than the first thought that comes to mind..:


« Last Edit: February 19, 2020, 04:24 PM by FestitaMakool »
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

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Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 478
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2020, 04:26 PM »
..Getting YouTube videos in here isn’t just straight forward - to me at least. [eek]
7th time a charm..
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4764
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2020, 05:14 PM »
That’s cool.

I hung my old Fein vac from a joist (which helped with hose management) but it couldn’t travel like his vacs. So I had to buy extra hose and management became an issue again.

Offline mrB

  • Posts: 712
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2020, 10:57 AM »
Ha. That's super cool. Me likey.
there's nothing like the right tool for the job

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1643
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2020, 11:32 AM »
Nice, looks like the rails are made from lengths of standard size (1-5/8" / P1000) unistrut. You can get track rollers sized to fit inside the strut. They will hold a few hundred pounds each depending on which style you get.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 478
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2020, 11:43 AM »
Me like too.. and can be easily done in my future workshop - being narrow and fairly long.
What do you think of making a trolley or cart instead? That way you may vary the DC’s you’re using, and even for other things. As Bob D. says, basing it on readily available components it should be cost effective as well.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 1220
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Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2020, 12:31 PM »
I love it!  But I'm wondering how big a hassle it is to empty the bag.  Even a CT22 is heavy to lift overhead.

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3322
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2020, 03:43 PM »
look good but i dont see the point of moving the vac when you could just move the hose and leave the vac on a shelf. it would use less space and less risk of damaging the vac. my ct22 is prity heavy when its full. i wouldnt like it to fall from that height
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1643
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2020, 04:04 PM »
I think that's why most people would opt for the boom arm hanging off the wall int he center of the shop or if you mount the boom in the center of the ceiling and it could swing 360 degrees that would be better. Biggest obstacle would be to make sure nothing interferes at the boom elevation or lower so that it can swing which would mean keep the lighting mounted close to the ceiling or recessed. I would want a minimum 9.5 foot ceiling. Right now my shop is 10.5 feet and if I moved all the lights up tight on the ceiling and eliminate everything else with a 7 or maybe 8 foot arm I could reach almost everywhere I think in my 24' x 24' shop.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1755
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2020, 04:19 PM »
That ceiling track is out-of-the-box thinking and is cool, but I won't use that system in my shop, because I won't use any dust extractor/vac without the dust deputy. I almost never have to replace any filters since I put the DD on all my vacs. Not only money is saved, there's also one fewer thing to handle when cleaning the vac.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 2085
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2020, 04:45 PM »
look good but i dont see the point of moving the vac when you could just move the hose and leave the vac on a shelf. it would use less space and less risk of damaging the vac. my ct22 is prity heavy when its full. i wouldnt like it to fall from that height
First, you want to minimize hose length to maintain good suction. There is significant friction loss in the hose.
Second, his shop is some 12 m (40 ft) long and with that track he has 100% coverage.

I do agree that T-lock latch looks iffy when it has to hold the entire vac. His setup is minimalist and slick, but I would opt for a cable car like platform to carry the vac.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2020, 04:53 PM by Svar »

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3322
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2020, 04:52 PM »
shane posted this here https://festoolownersgroup.com/index.php?pretty;board=ask-festool;topic=max-length-of-50-mm-hose-without-loss-of-suction-efficiency.msg187453


Rob,

I was able to gain access to some information. The maximum length for combining D50 and D27 hoses is 98'. We would only recommend this length, or lengths beyond say 60' for fine dust like that produced by sanders. The D50 length should represent roughly 2/5 of the total length, the D27 the remainder.

So, you're well within these specifications with a 4m D50 and shorter D27.

Shane


so if you put the vac in the middle you could easily do his workshop and the yard outside [eek]
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3322
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2020, 04:53 PM »
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 478
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2020, 04:58 PM »
look good but i dont see the point of moving the vac when you could just move the hose and leave the vac on a shelf. it would use less space and less risk of damaging the vac. my ct22 is prity heavy when its full. i wouldnt like it to fall from that height
First, you want to minimize hose length to maintain good suction. There is significant friction loss in the hose.
Second, his shop is some 12 m (40 ft) long and with that track he has 100% coverage.

I do agree that T-lock latch looks iffy when it has to hold the entire vac. His setup is minimalist and slick, but I would opt for a cable car like platform to carry the vac.

Second that - the “engineering” in hanging an even empty CT by the T-lock.. ohh well.. I was also thinking maybe a kind of gondola. The SYS Power Hub is also a nice touch. I did have plenty of wall outlets in my former garage, but strangely it could be more, closer.. overhead is perfect.
“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 2085
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2020, 04:59 PM »
The maximum length for combining D50 and D27 hoses is 98'. We would only recommend this length, or lengths beyond say 60' for fine dust like that produced by sanders. The D50 length should represent roughly 2/5 of the total length, the D27 the remainder.
So, you're well within these specifications with a 4m D50 and shorter D27.
There is no "maximum" length per se. There is steady loss of suction with increasing length. You might get away with long hose for sanding, but for sawing, routing, and cleanup you need as much flow as possible. I have vac hanging on the wall, but I often take it off and shorten the hose when I clean far corners.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2020, 05:05 PM by Svar »

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3322
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2020, 05:01 PM »
how often would you sand with 98feet of house in a 40 foot workshop.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2020, 05:04 PM by Alan m »
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline FestitaMakool

  • Posts: 478
Re: Another take to distributing DC in your shop
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2020, 05:03 PM »
Festool do actually have a solution, albeit expensive.. but you do get air, dc and power outlets.

“The Stig” Yes, it is true, at least some part of it..
“If you have an old Land Rover and a fit wife, you’re most likely always busy”