Author Topic: Angle jig  (Read 3699 times)

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Offline Oldwood

  • Posts: 472
  • Alberta, Canada
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #30 on: April 27, 2021, 11:59 AM »
When angle accuracy matters (whether it's 90*, 22.5* or 75*), tradespeople building countertops, kitchen cabinets, etc. use this not-so-secret weapon as a last resort!

https://tinyurl.com/4pp8274u

That looks like it might be useful, I have never seen that stuff before [big grin]
Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance.
Confucius

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Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 496
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #31 on: April 27, 2021, 02:59 PM »
When angle accuracy matters (whether it's 90*, 22.5* or 75*), tradespeople building countertops, kitchen cabinets, etc. use this not-so-secret weapon as a last resort!

https://tinyurl.com/4pp8274u

That looks like it might be useful, I have never seen that stuff before [big grin]

Just be aware that the stuff called "painter's putty" is oil based and it takes forever to dry/harden. It is meant to hold glass to the sash, it makes a lousy filler. There are better options for that.
Durham's rockhard water putty comes to mind or ordinary autobody filler both work well.

As far as the original project of this topic, the famous "it depends" comes to mind.
In some situations and for most of the past years, it is just quicker/easier to template it. I have seen guys do it with cardboard strips, but 1/4" plywood or MDF strips are far more accurate.
In more recent years we would do that with a Laser Templator. This can then be uploaded to the CNC to cut out parts for Solid Surface tops, or particle board for laminate tops. On a job of solid wood like that it would likely just be cut out of 1/4" MDF for an odd shape or just transferred to a measured drawing for simple rectangular parts.
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Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 2699
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #32 on: April 27, 2021, 03:25 PM »
When it comes to furniture pieces, I wouldn't use any of the putty except the Timber Mate which you can find a matching color or stain it (the latter is a safer bet in my opinion). It doesn't shrink, and, with proper finishing skill, does a good job fooling an average consumer.

Offline Oldwood

  • Posts: 472
  • Alberta, Canada
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #33 on: April 27, 2021, 05:45 PM »
When it comes to furniture pieces, I wouldn't use any of the putty except the Timber Mate which you can find a matching color or stain it (the latter is a safer bet in my opinion). It doesn't shrink, and, with proper finishing skill, does a good job fooling an average consumer.

Way back when, Windsor plywood sold a wood filler that was wood ground fine with a solvent based binder. I don't remember the name.That was the last one I found that would stain like most woods. It was also easy to thin with lacquer thinner when it dried out in the can.

I have not tried the timber mate.

Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance.
Confucius

Offline Wayne CW

  • Posts: 39
  • Wayne
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2021, 12:50 PM »
Here is my jig/fence
"There is always something new to learn and old age isn't an excuse to quit."

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 5228
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #35 on: May 08, 2021, 01:26 PM »
I like the flat square clamp friendly sides of your table.

Offline Crazyraceguy

  • Posts: 496
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #36 on: May 08, 2021, 07:34 PM »
When it comes to furniture pieces, I wouldn't use any of the putty except the Timber Mate which you can find a matching color or stain it (the latter is a safer bet in my opinion). It doesn't shrink, and, with proper finishing skill, does a good job fooling an average consumer.

Way back when, Windsor plywood sold a wood filler that was wood ground fine with a solvent based binder. I don't remember the name. That was the last one I found that would stain like most woods. It was also easy to thin with lacquer thinner when it dried out in the can.

I have not tried the timber mate.
Famowood?
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75

Offline Oldwood

  • Posts: 472
  • Alberta, Canada
Re: Angle jig
« Reply #37 on: May 08, 2021, 08:15 PM »
"Famowood?"

I don't think so. But I can't be sure it has been a long time since I used it.
Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance.
Confucius