Author Topic: Working with some 8/4 lumber  (Read 2571 times)

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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Working with some 8/4 lumber
« on: May 10, 2022, 07:52 AM »


I bought some 8/4 Hard maple over the weekend for a workbench project. The boards were all about 10' long and 10-10.5" wide. I was able to get them oversized for the lengths I need but now I need to rip them. I was going to use the TS55 but after checking, they're all over 2", maybe 2 1/8".

I would like some of the boards to end up at 1 7/8" for leg glue ups/laminating together but it isn't 100% necessary. The legs finish out at 3.5" after gluing two boards together so there is a little wiggle room. The rest of the boards finish out at 1 3/4" for frame pieces/stretchers on the base of the workbench.

My initial feeling was I should do everything I can to not face joint the wide boards on the planer w/ a sled as that would possibly result in removing too much material. I wanted to rip them first to get the two parts out of each board (i.e. a leg blank and a stretcher), then start face jointing/planing to oversized thickness.

As I see it I can

A) Plunge about an inch or more with TS55, flip board and carefully line up to finish the cut, leaving the width well oversized. I believe I have enough width to do this and still get both parts from each board oversized in width.

B) Start face jointing/planing until the thickness is below 2", then rip in 1 pass with the TS55 and panther blade taking it slow.

I will have access to a proper jointer when necessary, as well as a bandsaw, but that requires me to schedule and work around my job and family obligations. Trying to limit that trip as much as possible and do what I can ahead of time.

Thanks,
Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline afish

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2022, 07:56 AM »
Sounds like the perfect excuse to get a ts75

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2022, 07:58 AM »
Sounds like the perfect excuse to get a ts75

Stop it. I had one in my cart this morning. I don't know how many 8/4 projects are in my future, or if I'll end up getting a bandsaw since those seem extremely useful/necessary for hardwood projects and hand tool work.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline afish

  • Posts: 1325
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2022, 08:02 AM »
Common, Festools are almost free, when you factor in there resale value. You can buy it and sell it much later and the hit is almost non existent.  If theres a shortage again you might even be able to double your money.  Go ahead and click the complete purchase button.   [thumbs up] you can do it.

Offline cpw

  • Posts: 360
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2022, 08:12 AM »
I would definitely try to rip before jointing.  If there is cup, the thinner board will require removing far less thickness.

If you don't want the excuse for a TS75, you could start the rip with your TS55, then finish it with a jig saw (or even handsaw).

Online waho6o9

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2022, 08:22 AM »
Please add a Festool Panther rip blade for your ts75 before hitting the purchase button. 

 [thumbs up]

As an added bonus if you work with sheet goods you can cut three sheets at a time with the ts75.

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 493
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2022, 08:22 AM »
I'll go against the green tide here and suggest a DW-735 planer...a wide jointer would make it all so easy but increases the budget and floorspace requirements substantially.  You could use a hand plane to get one side of the boards (easiest to hand plane the "cupped" side at the edges) flat enough to move to the planer.  Since I only have a 6" jointer when I buy wide stock, I have my supplier run one face over the jointer to get it skip-planed, not perfect but flat enough to finish plane from there.  They have 30" jointers and the charge is pretty nominal.

Online MikeGE

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2022, 08:27 AM »
If you don't want the excuse for a TS75, you could start the rip with your TS55, then finish it with a jig saw (or even handsaw).

That's what I did...at first.  I had two 3-meter lengths of 75mm thick walnut to rip into four sections each and used the TS55 to make the initial cut, with a rip handsaw to finish the cut.  In my youth, this would have been a trivial matter, but I'm no longer a young man.  After the second rip cut, I bought a TS75 and Panther blade.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2022, 09:12 AM »
 [unsure] [unsure] [unsure]

Local store has the 75 in stock. I'm at the stage of the Festool game where I pawn a tool off before buying a new one. I suppose I could let the MFK 700 go and get it back some other day if I ever need it again. . .
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline afish

  • Posts: 1325
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2022, 09:18 AM »
I will have access to a proper jointer when necessary, as well as a bandsaw, but that requires me to schedule and work around my job and family obligations. Trying to limit that trip as much as possible and do what I can ahead of time.

Thanks,
Matt
So, what Im hearing is buying a TS75 will save you a bunch of time?

In that case. If the wife asks just explain to her how much time you will save and tell her "No, I didnt buy a Festool... I bought quality time back with the family. How can you put a price on that, dear?"  OK Ill stop now.  [smile] If I keep going some retailer is going to owe me a commission.     

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 2318
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2022, 10:28 AM »
Heck, someone paid me ~$600 for the 6-8 years I was using my TS75 (sale price - initial cost = +$600), but that was when they weren't available new. For me, the 75 did nothing other than gather dust.

Matt, I'd rip full depth with the 55, flip and rip again proud of your first cut, then trim off excess w/ a piloted router bit.

RMW

Common, Festools are almost free, when you factor in there resale value. You can buy it and sell it much later and the hit is almost non existent.  If theres a shortage again you might even be able to double your money.  Go ahead and click the complete purchase button.   [thumbs up] you can do it.
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Mortiser

  • Posts: 132
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2022, 10:43 AM »
I'm with your first suggestion and with Richard/RMW. If I didn't think I had a significant need for a TS-75, I'd make the first cut with my TS-55 then easily mark the second side from the kerf of that first cut and finish the rip. As you realize, you want to get all of your rough cut pieces pretty close to finished size before jointing or planing in order to save stock.
Good luck with your project.

Offline jobsworth

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2022, 10:55 AM »
Simple, set up your guide rail, make your cut, flip the board over, set up your guide rail cut the other side, then if you have one joint the edges or use a friend jointer.

that saying if you have a a long enough guide rail or enough guide rails to connect. I did it it cutting mesquite slabs with my TS 55 EQ

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2022, 11:16 AM »
I tried the TS55 and flip trick. It works okay, probably well enough for my needs at the moment. Slow going but it saves me $790 (TS75 + ripping blade).

It didn't have any wobble so I started planing and since I'm a total novice here, what am I looking at? Is this curly maple? Is my planer chattering? It's flat in every meaningful way that I can check it. DW735 w/ helical cutter head.

Instagram @matts.garage

Offline festal

  • Posts: 341
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2022, 11:20 AM »
What bench style are going with?


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Online waho6o9

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2022, 11:25 AM »
"I'm a total novice here, what am I looking at?"

Hopefully it's some awesome grain pattern.  Throw some mineral spirits on it and see it pop.

It doesn't look like planer marks from my view.

Best

Offline Yardbird

  • Posts: 343
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2022, 11:39 AM »
Is that maple or wild cherry?  Very similar wood grain (IMO).  I think some antique cherry furniture is really hard maple stained to look like cherry.  Either way, beautiful wood.

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2022, 11:39 AM »
@waho6o9



@festal

It's basically the Hybrid Workbench from Wood Whisperer, substituting a Benchcrafted leg vise.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline tsmi243

  • Posts: 274
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2022, 11:39 AM »
Yeah that's curly.  If you can't feel it, it's not chatter.  Congrats

You might want to save these for something special, and rebuy some plain boards for the workbench.

Offline festal

  • Posts: 341
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2022, 11:40 AM »
@waho6o9



@festal

It's basically the Hybrid Workbench from Wood Whisperer, substituting a Benchcrafted leg vise.
Nice. Got the plans as well. Need to get wood and start as well . Keep the progress posts going


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Online waho6o9

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2022, 11:46 AM »
Woo Hoo

Fantastic grain and thanks for the pic!


Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2022, 11:46 AM »
Yeah that's curly.  If you can't feel it, it's not chatter.  Congrats

You might want to save these for something special, and rebuy some plain boards for the workbench.

Thanks. Too far in now to switch gears. It'll make a fine leg to look at  [big grin] This workbench is something I'm making to teach my children how to woodwork on with hand tools (and to teach myself as well) when it's done. It'll get handed down to one of them, so if it looks nice then, it looks nice.
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline festal

  • Posts: 341
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #22 on: May 10, 2022, 12:30 PM »
Should come out awesome

Offline Crazyraceguy

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #23 on: May 10, 2022, 08:02 PM »
That is definitely curl in the grain, great looking stock.

I wouldn't give up a MFK700 for a TS75. It may be "worth more" in dollars, especially a few months ago when they were very scarce, but I don't use the TS75 nearly as much.
The TS75 is great in situations like you have there, but in my work, that is not very often.
I have no need to "get rid" of it, uses do come up. 
CSX
DF500 + assortment set
PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1010F
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
TS55, FS1080, FS1400 holey, FS1900, FS3000
CT26E + Workshop cleaning set
RO90
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ETS EC 125
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TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation
MFT clamps set

Offline Greg Powers

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Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #24 on: May 10, 2022, 08:23 PM »
I like hard maple, but it is tough to work with. Sanding takes forever......
Greg Powers
Size:XL

Offline Mortiser

  • Posts: 132
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #25 on: May 10, 2022, 10:32 PM »
Yep, looks like curly maple. Hard maple's perfect. I've made most all of my shop needs out of it... stands, cabinets, benches, etc. Holds up extremely well, is stable, and takes on a nice patina over time. You'll enjoy it. (Your ETS EC will make it shine!)
Have fun!
----
Rich

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2022, 10:40 AM »
Sorry @afish you didn't get me this time. Maybe next time!





I took a 1" depth cut, then 1 3/4", then flipped and did a few light passes since each board seemed to want to pinch the blade at the end. Once I had it close enough I snapped them apart. Everything is still well oversized at this point so I didn't need perfect edges.

Happy with the results. Even if I did own the TS 75, I would use a similar approach of sneaking up on the final cut.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 512
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2022, 12:50 PM »
Another option worth considering would be a bandsaw..  even the 10" Rikon cuts up to 5" thick material.

It's cheaper than a Ts75 and offers a lot of versatility.  Plus, ripping on the bandsaw is fun.

Offline squall_line

  • Posts: 1463
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2022, 01:45 PM »
Another option worth considering would be a bandsaw..  even the 10" Rikon cuts up to 5" thick material.

It's cheaper than a Ts75 and offers a lot of versatility.  Plus, ripping on the bandsaw is fun.

The OP has access to a bandsaw, just not at home (emphasis mine):

I will have access to a proper jointer when necessary, as well as a bandsaw, but that requires me to schedule and work around my job and family obligations. Trying to limit that trip as much as possible and do what I can ahead of time.

Offline SoonerFan

  • Posts: 541
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2022, 11:39 PM »
@DynaGlide This is a good project and the maple is beautiful.  I used 8/4 maple for my out feed table.  Like you, I made the legs by glueing two piece together to get legs amount 3.5” square.  Used the maple for the apron as well.  I made the top out of two layers of plywood (table is 8’ by 8’) with Formica.  Finally I used what little maple I had left the the edge banding. 

Keep opus posted and good luck!

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 1455
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #30 on: May 12, 2022, 08:01 AM »
@SoonerFan Yeah I like the stuff. It isn't tooooo bad to work with. The TS55 with ripping blade cuts through it pretty easily if I go slow. The Kapex does as well, I just take several shallow kerf cuts with either. Not a big deal and trying to avoid kickback.

I'm kind of mixing in elements between TWW Roubo and Hybrid bench designs. I have both sets of plans and videos. Once I get the legs to final dimension I can take my time doing the joinery. There's quite a bit involved to install the Benchcrafted leg vise and still allow room for the mortise and tenon connections between the legs and stretchers.

Luckily Marc is primarily a power tool guy and used those to do most everything in the videos except where some light hand tool work was needed.

Matt
Instagram @matts.garage

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline woodbutcherbower

  • Posts: 381
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #31 on: May 15, 2022, 09:10 AM »
The grain in that maple is highly prized by guitar builders - it’s known as a ‘flame top’. The other variation is the ‘quilted top’.

Offline Bryston

  • Posts: 11
Re: Working with some 8/4 lumber
« Reply #32 on: July 06, 2022, 12:30 PM »
That curly maple is worth saving for something special I agree. Especially if it's 8/4. It's worth even more.