Author Topic: Using a track saw to resaw boards.  (Read 4325 times)

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Offline SRSemenza

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Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« on: July 16, 2019, 04:20 PM »
Here is a technique to resaw boards using a track saw.  Obviously a bandsaw is a better choice but if you don't have one or in a pinch this works pretty well.

Attach the board to the side of the MFT or workbench. In this case I used screws driven into the bench edge. If you don't want to drive screws into the bench then use clamps at the ends of the board in whatever fashion works for your set up situation.

Make sure the screws and clamps are only at the ends. You do not cut all the way to the ends. Be sure to avoid cutting into the screws or clamps. Leaving the ends uncut also provides support to clamp and keeps the split board together in one piece until you are done resawing.

You can cut up to double the saws depth of cut by flipping the board and cutting from both edges. You can also leave an inch or so down the center of the board and finish with a handsaw or jigsaw. Leaving some in the center adds support and can also be used to increase the width of board that can be resawn.

If the saw struggles in the cut just do several passes at increasing depths. You may find that adding shims to kep the kerf open is helpful. Especially when doing a second cut from the other edge.

After the resaw cuts are done cut the ends of the board off to free the two split pieces.

                    




Seth

« Last Edit: October 26, 2021, 11:39 AM by SRSemenza »

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Offline Bob D.

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2019, 04:33 PM »
Good tip.

I didn't see it mentioned but it may have been in the description.

Be sure to keep the same face of the board toward the table, so
when you 'flip' it it's end over end not rotated 90° as you look
down the board.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2019, 07:14 PM »
Thanks for taking those pics Seth!

I got excited and tested it out for myself with my MFT/3 and TS55.

















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Offline Cheese

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2019, 09:02 AM »
That's pretty slick...thanks for that Seth.  [smile]   Nice to know that it's a possible alternative in a pinch.

However, I couldn't live without a bandsaw...that was my second major tool purchase right after a floor standing drill press.


Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2019, 09:10 AM »
@SRSemenza , thanks for this.

Ideas like this help show the versatility of the MFT profiles when all too often the holes in the top take center stage.

Peter

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2019, 10:39 AM »
My MFT’s are the older style and they cause a problem when clamping stock to the apron rails. The rails lean in a little so the stock needs to be shimmed to be perpendicular to the work top.

I think the MFT-3 is fine as is?
« Last Edit: July 17, 2019, 12:23 PM by Michael Kellough »

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2019, 10:49 AM »
It seemed to be perpendicular with my MFT/3.  I didn't check with a square though.
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Offline Roachmill

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2019, 10:50 AM »
Never thought of resawing like that so have another thanks for the tip :D

I've used a similar method to this for cutting the grooves for splines in picture frame corners. Never did I realise I was so close to this way of resawing [blink]

Offline Gogsi

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2021, 07:53 AM »
Thanks so much for this Seth !
A few minutes ago, I was thinking to myself, "Wouldn't it be great if I could resaw this piece of wood? Then, I could use it on my next project."   
BUT, I had no bandsaw or other appropriate tool and then I thought, "No, I can't imagine my new TS 55 could do something like that.
Well..............could it ?"
    A few minutes later, I couldn't believe my luck !   I found your post..
Can't wait to try it out myself.
     Aint the internet such an amazing technology : )

Offline Packard

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2021, 09:04 AM »
I suppose a trainer could teach a thoroughbred to run on its hind legs only, but it would not seem to be the right animal for that job.

By extension, I suppose you can re-saw using a track saw, but it does not seem to be the right tool for the job. 

I find little need for re-sawing, so this does not come up for me.  But if I did, I would get a band saw.  Not much more than a new track saw ($1,600.00).  This saw will handle 12" wide boards according to the specifications. 



https://www.rockler.com/laguna-1412-14-bandsaw?country=US&sid=V91040&promo=shopping&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=PL&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIoueXr5Ho8wIVSuWzCh3i4wb2EAQYAiABEgLU6_D_BwE

Offline Paul_HKI

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2021, 09:38 AM »
Yeah, but good luck putting that in the back of your car, or tucking it away under the stairs or whatever when you're done.   [big grin]

I like the solution.  Simple, creative, perfectly good enough for a lot of needs. 

If a man has enough space to put them and deep enough pockets to pay for them, you can buy a tool for any task.  But it's often more satisfying to get a job done well using what you have to hand.  For occasional resawing of boards for small projects, I expect the TS and an MFT will do a fine job.
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Offline Packard

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2021, 09:56 AM »
I rarely need to resaw, but when I do, I use the table saw and flip the board leaving a small attachment section in the middle.  I then use a hand saw to separate the two sides.   Then I run it through the planer. 

If I have more than a couple of boards to resaw, I will just go to the lumber yard and buy what I need.  The local lumber yard will mill to any size for a fee.  I never had the need, so I don't know what that fee is.

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2021, 11:38 AM »
I rarely need to resaw, but when I do, I use the table saw and flip the board leaving a small attachment section in the middle.  I then use a hand saw to separate the two sides.   Then I run it through the planer. 


^ Same method but done with the track saw. ^

The method is certainly not ideal.  And I will emphasize, the set up has to be done right and carefully.

     Not the method I would choose, but if lacking a band saw and lacking a table saw it can get the job done. This is more for a one off situation. The board in the demonstration pictures is just to show how it works. The first time I did this it was for a purple heart board that I could not readily get more of so I decided to give it a try.

 Just something to add to peoples cutting arsenals.


Seth

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2021, 11:39 AM »
Thanks so much for this Seth !
A few minutes ago, I was thinking to myself, "Wouldn't it be great if I could resaw this piece of wood? Then, I could use it on my next project."   
BUT, I had no bandsaw or other appropriate tool and then I thought, "No, I can't imagine my new TS 55 could do something like that.
Well..............could it ?"
    A few minutes later, I couldn't believe my luck !   I found your post..
Can't wait to try it out myself.
     Aint the internet such an amazing technology : )

Glad it was helpful!  [smile]

Seth

Offline Packard

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2021, 11:44 AM »
If it was valuable lumber I might be inclined to google "wood milling services near me".

If you buy from the lumber yard I would expect that they would be willing to re-mill some stock for a fee.   

ML Condon in Whiteplains, NY shows:

Our friendly, wood milling staff can custom mill your order to any thickness, width, or length, and shape. We understand your projects may require same-day service. M. L. Condon has the ability to select and mill lumber on-site, allowing you to take your order with you that day.


Offline squall_line

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2021, 11:50 AM »
If it was valuable lumber I might be inclined to google "wood milling services near me".

If you buy from the lumber yard I would expect that they would be willing to re-mill some stock for a fee.   

ML Condon in Whiteplains, NY shows:

Our friendly, wood milling staff can custom mill your order to any thickness, width, or length, and shape. We understand your projects may require same-day service. M. L. Condon has the ability to select and mill lumber on-site, allowing you to take your order with you that day.

It would take me the better part of an entire day to even find a local mill, let alone drive to one and get something like this done.

We grow corn and soybeans here, not trees, and the availability of mills and yards suffers as a result.  Some of us have little choice but to get our stock shipped to us or make a day trip to pick it out in person.

Of course, by the time I found something that valuable, I would have some more of this worked out, but it's good to have options.  Especially with the narrower kerf of the new TSC55K or the HK.

Offline Packard

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2021, 11:58 AM »
I am self-taught in woodworking.  Everything I know about it comes from books, magazines, experience (mistakes) and lately from the Internet.

I do recall one book saying that a good way to cut multiple strips of wood was to mount two blades in a table saw with a spacer between them.  So it suggested that with one pass I could turn out 2 strips 1/4" wide. 

Now that I know better, I would worry about kickback. 

That is why I used a hand saw to part the resawn lumber.  Little chance of a kickback that way.

The only injury I have ever had in woodworking was a "kick-up" of a short piece of narrow stock.  I had never even heard of a "kick-up" before that.


Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2021, 12:16 PM »
Like I said ............................  just something to add to peoples cutting arsenal.

It's usefulness is very situational. The board I cut on the day that I cut it, the method was very useful.

Seth

Offline Birdhunter

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2021, 01:05 PM »
That process looks inherently risky. Just my gut saying a kick back could easily happen if the blade gets pinched. I work with a lot of highly figured wood that moves when cut due to internal stresses changing. Guess I’m doubly cautious.
Birdhunter

Offline Packard

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2021, 01:24 PM »
That process looks inherently risky. Just my gut saying a kick back could easily happen if the blade gets pinched. I work with a lot of highly figured wood that moves when cut due to internal stresses changing. Guess I’m doubly cautious.

Short pieces are risky on the table saw.  (Mine does not have a built-in splitter.)

The Festool has a splitter, but these are pretty short pieces anyhow. 

I would be inclined to only cut on two edges and then use a hand saw to part the panels.  It is very easy to do.  The two open kerfs makes alignment automatic.  And you are going to have to run it through the planer anyhow, so I would use the handsaw.

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2021, 01:26 PM »

I do recall one book saying that a good way to cut multiple strips of wood was to mount two blades in a table saw with a spacer between them.  So it suggested that with one pass I could turn out 2 strips 1/4" wide. 

Snip.
The only injury I have ever had in woodworking was a "kick-up" of a short piece of narrow stock.  I had never even heard of a "kick-up" before that.

I have never seen, heard or read about any serious woodworker using two blades in a table saw at the same time to rip lumber, unless the "two blades" we're talking about are mounted with "wobble washers", which are actually a dado set.

Apart from real safety concerns (including holding the blades securely to the shaft), the rip quality would be poor due to vibration. If you can find out the title of the book, please share it.

The "kick-up" you experienced was actually part of a "kickback." The stock was "lifted up" by the back teeth of the spinning blade as it was fed into the blade.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2021, 01:31 PM by ChuckS »

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2021, 01:38 PM »
Unless it's beyond the cutting depth capacity of my table saw (SawStop PCS), I always use my table saw to resaw (much faster compared to my mediocre bandsaw), similar to this, but with one difference:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?t=128&v=spotCL6y_7c&feature=youtu.be

Critical difference: I install a tall fence before resawing if I am resawing with the full blade depth, or close to its full depth.

A rip blade, riving knife, push shoe and featherboards are indispensable when resawing.

The drawback of resawing on a table saw (even with a thin kerf blade) is a bit of wood waste.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2021, 01:56 PM by ChuckS »

Offline bcrawley

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2021, 04:07 PM »
ChuckS I've read about using two blades for tenoning applications before. Two blades spaced as with a dado stack, and the depth of cut is likely only an inch. So people do it; I haven't and I'm not sure I would. I searched and found this pdf pretty quickly.

Twin-blade joinery

Even that is a long way from a deep rip.

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #23 on: October 26, 2021, 04:21 PM »
ChuckS I've read about using two blades for tenoning applications before. Two blades spaced as with a dado stack, and the depth of cut is likely only an inch. So people do it; I haven't and I'm not sure I would. I searched and found this pdf pretty quickly.

Twin-blade joinery

Even that is a long way from a deep rip.

Tenoning and ripping are two different sawing procedures as the former does not result in any piece coming apart and off, just like dadoeing. The middle part was still intact as the article photo shows. No loose piece to get trapped between blades (as it would be in the case of ripping).

That's why it's safe cutting a dado using a saw fence as a stop block. but not when cross-cutting a piece off. I'd like to see an example (text in a book or magazine or video) in which it is shown a stock is ripped in three pieces at a time using two saw blades on a table saw. Then I can easily point out where the danger is, and why people don't do it.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2021, 05:42 PM by ChuckS »

Offline Svar

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2021, 04:30 PM »
I'd like to see an example (text in a book or magazine or video) in which it is shown a stock is ripped in three pieces at a time using two saw blades on a table saw. Then I can easily point out where the danger is, and why people don't do it.
Gang rip saws with multiple blades do just that. Of course they are not fed by hand.

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Using a track saw to resaw boards.
« Reply #25 on: October 26, 2021, 05:36 PM »
I'd like to see an example (text in a book or magazine or video) in which it is shown a stock is ripped in three pieces at a time using two saw blades on a table saw. Then I can easily point out where the danger is, and why people don't do it.
Gang rip saws with multiple blades do just that. Of course they are not fed by hand.

Gang rip saws rely on hand feeding initially, and then the rolling feeder takes over. But they aren't table saws as we know them.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2021, 06:33 PM by ChuckS »