Author Topic: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes  (Read 3845 times)

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Offline Stan Tillinghast

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Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« on: October 18, 2021, 06:11 PM »
I am planning on building replacement bathroom cabinets from pre-finished maple plywood.
This will be my first build of conventional cabinets. They will be Euro style, using the LR32 system for hinge holes and shelf pin holes.
I've just watched (again) Greg Paolini's video of cabinet building, and Brett Shiveley's Festool video series on cabinets.

I have all the tools needed to do Domino or pocket-hole joints, and step bits for Confirmat screws; also I have an as-yet unused Milwaukee 23 gauge pin nailer I can use to tack the parts together.

It seems to me that for these cabinets, where all ends will be hidden, that dominoes are overkill and screws, such as Greg Paolini uses, would be more than adequate. I know confirmat screws are recommended for MDF, but are not bugle-head GRK screws fine for assembly of plywood cabinets (#8 x 2 inch?)

I haven't yet tried using the GRK screws without pre-drilling; I can try and see if that seems to produce a neat result.
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Offline ChuckS

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2021, 06:34 PM »
My take:

Just get the job done (probably cheaper too): Screws or pins.

To get more practice and experience with the domino joinery and techniques: Dominoes.

Offline tsmi243

  • Posts: 145
Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2021, 07:16 PM »
If you already own the Domino, it takes about 3 minutes and two dollars to add them in. 

Having them in also means you can go a little large on your pilot holes, to minimize any risk of splitting when you drive the screws in.  Since the dominos are doing all the work in the vertical plane, the screws don't need to be all that tight- they're just making sure the parts stay ON the dominos in the horizontal plane. 

I know some of the nicer screws from GRK or Spax say "no predrilling needed"- but I don't think I'll ever be that brave. 

Offline Lincoln

  • Posts: 172
Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2021, 07:19 PM »
If the sides aren't seen, or covered by end panels, screw and glue.
I'd definitely pre-drill the screws.

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2021, 07:32 PM »
I like pocket hole screws and dominos together. Sometimes glue , sometimes no glue ..... just depends.

 The dominos are more for ease of assembly and alignment (for my purpose) than strength. They will also hold panels vertically without any other clamps or supports while you drive the "no guesswork" PH screws.

 The pocket hole screws are, of course, predrilled taking care of that issue. PH screw are also a better choice for pulling parts together and basically no chance of splitting or blowing through a surface.

If using glue the pocket hole screws act as clamps too.

          A little more prep time but the combo makes the assembly soooo , fast and easy.

Seth

Offline guybo

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2021, 07:39 PM »
Hi, if using glue remember to remove the finish on the pre finished ply. You will do fine. guy

Offline waho6o9

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2021, 07:42 PM »
Dominoes make the job so efficient.  This will be a great job to expand your skill set.
Have fun and please post pictures when it's completed. 



Offline afish

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2021, 08:39 PM »
do a test panel with the confirmats before doing the main cabinet. confirmat screws can bulge or separate the plys even with pre drilling. just seems to depend on the quality of the plywood.  also if its pre finished I wouldnt put much faith in the glue. narrow crown 18ga. staples work well with plywood and helps pull the pieces tight followed up with a few coarse spax or drywall screws.

Offline mrFinpgh

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2021, 08:49 PM »
Dominos do make it a lot easier to get everything lined up for assembly. In my opinion, that's the hardest part of building a cabinet - putting it together.

I tried Greg Paolini's stapler approach, but it led to a couple blow-throughs with the stapler.  Maybe just a technique issue.

I think that 2" screws are more than enough. I think I bought type 17 coarse threaded 2" square drives from quickscrews.com for my kitchen a few years ago.  It seemed like the key was to have a good jig for laying out your holes and a sharp countersink bit.  The dominos add a helping hand and are very useful when you're doing something like a 5' tall cabinet box.



Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2021, 08:58 PM »
Hi, if using glue remember to remove the finish on the pre finished ply. You will do fine. guy

Yup, that too. I just put together some prefinply drawer boxes. I use the LS130 with 60gr Cristal to sand off the edge for glue.

Seth

Offline woodferret

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2021, 09:17 PM »
I haven't yet tried using the GRK screws without pre-drilling; I can try and see if that seems to produce a neat result.

I've tried.  When you're 3/8" away from the edge of the plywood, the countersink drill on the GRK can compress and lever the layer up.  Varies by plywood quality, but eh... I've taken to predrill and even pre-countersink.

Offline Stan Tillinghast

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2021, 10:41 PM »
Thanks very much for the advice.
I do have a domino (500) , and feel comfortable using it. I understand the importance of referencing from the same face.
I appreciate the advice on the need to pre-drill for the screws.
I even bought the Woodpeckers drilling guide which would make that job neater.

Currently I'm mocking up a couple of types of panel door: one with cherry frame and maple inset, one all maple.

I just ordered Blum Tandem undermount slides and Blum full overlay hinges, thinking there is likely to be a supply problem with items like that.

I need to get busy choosing faucets, sinks and medicine cabinets too. Don't want to get half-way through and find something not available.
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Offline Rick Herrick

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2021, 10:45 PM »
Check out the series on YT by Eric (former/current member here ?).  I think his 7 part series is under 'The Poplar Shop'.  Excellent series for exactly what you are doing.   I used it as reference several times when I did my Euro cabs.

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2021, 11:10 PM »


  @Stan Tillinghast  Which pocket hole jig do you have?

Seth

Offline slavi.yordanov

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2021, 01:19 AM »
Dominos for alignment, glue and Spax MDF screws. I have used these screws for all my kitchen cabinets- no pre-drilling, no countersinking. Just mark a straight line half the thickness of the panel and that’s it.

Don’t forget to sand the finish where the glue will be, as others have mentioned.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/SPAX-8-x-1-3-4-in-T-Star-Plus-Drive-Partial-Thread-Zinc-Coated-Medium-Density-Fiberboard-MDF-Screw-200-per-Box-4351010400456/100582153

Offline Stan Tillinghast

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2021, 02:29 AM »
Seth - I have the simpler Kreg jig.

I presume the advantage of the pocket hole method is that the screw isn't going into the edge of the plywood?
Nevertheless, it is more time-consuming than just screwing directly into the plywood, is it not?

I could easily do a combination of dominoes and screws; whether the glue is needed is another question. These cabinets aren't going anywhere, after all.

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Offline Birdhunter

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2021, 06:01 AM »
I’ve had bad misalignment results using only pocket holes. I’ve had better luck using a combination of Dominos with thoughtfully placed pocket holes. I’ve had the best results using only Dominos. However, I have a vast array of clamps.

I have not failed to predrill a screw hole since my long ago beginning days. It is heart breaking to see a nice piece of wood ruined by a blown out screw.
Birdhunter

Offline bruegf

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2021, 07:54 AM »
I used dominos and glue and clamped with the cabinet press

Fred

Offline Packard

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2021, 08:44 AM »
You can probably find the reports online, but I will summarize what I learned from the testing done by the RTA (Ready To Assemble) industry association (think "Ikea") and the Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers association. 

They each industry group tasked a different laboratory to test the strength of various fasteners. I am working from memory having read these articles about 10 years ago.  Details may be lost.

Included were:

1/4 turn fasteners
Drywall screws
dowels
dadoes
Confirmat screws.

Both ran similar tests and they were mostly testing for racking strength.  Note that the requirements strength differ for the two groups.  The RTA was mostly interested in racking strength.

The kitchen cabinet people were less concerned about that as the wall the cabinets are mounted against becomes a structural member.  But, it is a factor for free standing islands.

The test was run by having a vertical panel with horizontal "shelves" attached on one end only using the various fasteners.  No glue was used as they were rating the fasteners independent of glue.

They would load the end of the shelves to see when the joint would fail.

Both groups ran very similar tests with very similar results.

The worst performer was the dado.  That joint failed before any reading could be made on the scale.
Next was the 1/4 turn fasteners.
Then there was the drywall screws.
(The above performed in what was viewed as having unsatisfactory results.)
Confirmats and dowels performed similarly.  Confirmats have the advantage of drawing the surfaces together.

Confirmats have the advantage of not requiring clamps.
Dowels are cheaper to buy and cheaper to install (using automated equipment to gang drill and install.)
Dominoes were not tested but probably did as well as dowels in terms of strength.

They both noted that no fastener should be within 2" of the end of any panel as there would not be enough panel to support the fasteners.

I settled on confirmats and dowels.

For face frame cabinets, where I cover the end panels where visible, I use two confrimats per joint and I through dowel making sure that the dowels are below the surface when tapped in.  It is fast and alignment is guaranteed.  The confirmats replace clamps.  I have been known to back out the confirmats after the glue dries and install dowels in the re-drilled holes.

I don't recall them using pocket hole fasteners, but judging from the fasteners used for those I would imagine they would fare about as well as drywall screws.

I had long used dadoes for cabinets.  I think they are excellent for carrying a load when the shelf is fastened at both ends, but apparently not very good for racking strength.

Note:  I have been throwing out the term "racking strength" and to be clear this illustration shows racking as applied to the framing.  The same would apply to a cabinet.



Note:  If you are going to use through dowels after assembly, then the box must be square prior to drilling the dowel holes.  You will not be able to square things up afterward.



« Last Edit: October 19, 2021, 08:47 AM by Packard »

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2021, 09:41 AM »
That test is interesting but when you do have a secure back panel glued dados are very strong.

Over forty years ago I assembled my kitchen with readymade cabinets from Quakermaid. They were very well engineered so even though they only used 1/2” and 3/8” ply they are very strong and rigid because they used glued dados for every joint, including the face frames. They probably used one of those giant cabinet clamps. The wall cabinets were wonderfully lightweight.

Pocket holes screws are much stronger than screws driven into plywood edges. You could use PH screws alone except they tend to misalign the work pieces as the screws are tightened, especially if wet glue is in the joint. The combination of PH screws and Dominos is best for one person assembly IMO.

Offline Peter Kelly

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2021, 10:44 AM »
I am planning on building replacement bathroom cabinets from pre-finished maple plywood.
This will be my first build of conventional cabinets. They will be Euro style, using the LR32 system for hinge holes and shelf pin holes.
I've just watched (again) Greg Paolini's video of cabinet building, and Brett Shiveley's Festool video series on cabinets.

I have all the tools needed to do Domino or pocket-hole joints, and step bits for Confirmat screws; also I have an as-yet unused Milwaukee 23 gauge pin nailer I can use to tack the parts together.

It seems to me that for these cabinets, where all ends will be hidden, that dominoes are overkill and screws, such as Greg Paolini uses, would be more than adequate. I know confirmat screws are recommended for MDF, but are not bugle-head GRK screws fine for assembly of plywood cabinets (#8 x 2 inch?)

I haven't yet tried using the GRK screws without pre-drilling; I can try and see if that seems to produce a neat result.
Dominoes are handy to keep everything aligned when assembling and only take a minute or two to add. No glue really required if you're also using Confirmat type fasteners.

Unless you're planning on using Medite MR, I'd avoid MDF in a bathroom.   

Offline Packard

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2021, 12:26 PM »
I have a data-driven mindset.  I like to see numbers, pounds, etc. to support statements.  That is why I followed the advice from those studies. 

I have never seen any data on racking strength for pocket holes.   I do know that I can break apart face frames with two pocket holes in them fairly easily.  For racking strength, they depend upon the body of the screw.  That is why the confirmats, with their really thick shaft fared so well in the tests. 

The pocket hole screws I use (I do use them) are about the same thickness as drywall screws.  In my mind there is no reason that they should fare better than the drywall screws.  I will look on line to see if there are any actual tests done on that.

Offline Packard

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2021, 12:34 PM »
I could find data on pocket holes vs. dowels vs. tenons. 

As you might expect dowels were stronger than pocket holes and tenons were at the top of the heap.

https://woodgears.ca/joint_strength/pockethole.html

Dowels were about 50% stronger than pocket holes and mortise and tenons were 100% stronger. 

But sometimes stronger is not better.  Sometimes stronger is just stronger.  For face frames, I think stronger is not required.  Pocket holes are fine.  For other applications maybe not.

Surprising (to me) was the observation that glue did not improve the strength of pocket hole construction.  So if you are using pocket holes, glue may be a messy, but unnecessary step.

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2021, 12:54 PM »
I could find data on pocket holes vs. dowels vs. tenons.  Snip.

I don't use pocket-hole joinery, only Dominoes and M&Ts. This from FW:

Offline Packard

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2021, 03:43 PM »
One of my first face frame projects featured full bridle joints for the face frames and in place of the stub tenons on the rails and stiles of the drawer fronts.  Insanely I cross pegged all the joints with a single square dowel in the center of each junction. 

A clear case of "stronger is stronger, but not necessarily better".  It also took way to long to build.

The poundages listed in that chart seem exceedingly large.  Most of the tests I've seen see failure under 400 pounds. 

Can you link us to the article?  It seems worth reading.

I do have a beadlock jig.  Slow to use but as easy as a dowel jig except you have to drill 10 holes per joint.  I built a screen door from 5/4 pine years ago.  It is not showing any weakness in the joints.  So entirely satisfactory.  But I've seen tutorials using pocket holes to build essentially the same thing.  So, typical of me, I probably over-built it.

A while back I tore apart a site built vanity in my 1953 built home.  It was built entirely with butt joints and hand-driven nails.  I would note that it was fully intact when I tore it out and it was a bear to break down.  I have newfound respect for nails.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2021, 04:41 PM by Packard »

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2021, 03:57 PM »
Snip.
Can you link us to the article.  It seems worth reading.
Snip.
The joinery test is published in Fine Woodworking issue #203. The magazine doesn't provide the full article on its non-member website.

Offline squall_line

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #26 on: October 19, 2021, 04:59 PM »
A while back I tore apart a site built vanity in my 1953 built home.  It was built entirely with butt joints and hand-driven nails.  I would note that it was fully intact when I tore it out and it was a bear to break down.  I have newfound respect for nails.

The cabinets in my 1961 home all appear to be site-built, butt-and-nail.  I don't think they're going anywhere any time soon.

About a year ago, I removed a set of site-built built-in fixed-height bookshelves from a law office; all of the shelves were through-nailed to the uprights; 90 degrees on one side and toe-nailed from the other (because there was no direct access to the other side once it was in place).  It wasn't going to rack without significant persuasion.

There was an adjustable built-in shelf on the other side of the office with pilasters instead of nailed shelves, and we had to nail cross supports on the back to move it without it falling apart more than it already was.

Offline Stan Tillinghast

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #27 on: October 19, 2021, 08:19 PM »
Well, a lot of comments!
I had time this morning after applying a coat of Osmo to my mocked-up door panel pieces. BTW I'm making those doors with Sedge's method using stiles grooved the entire length. However, I find using 8x50 dominoes gives me a very strong door that will stay together while I switch out parts to look at different wood combinations.

I found Greg Paolini's Festool-sponsored video series on cabinet construction, which is newer than the earlier video I watched in which Greg used screws, with parts tacked in place with a brad nailer.
In the new video, naturally Greg used dominoes for everything!
No more dovetail drawer joints; face frame dominoes on, etc.

I suppose I will use dominoes, partly because it makes machining batches of parts and assembling them later easier. Also as a skill-builder.

I calculated the sheet goods needed for the three cabinets (2 30-inch with doors, one 24-inch with drawers) needed for each bathroom (counter for master and guest bath will be similar except 22 inch depth in the guest bath).

I've decided, as I think I indicated above, to start collecting supplies now as the supply chain issues will only get worse for a while. Some places are limiting orders for Blum hardware.

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Offline ChuckS

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #28 on: October 19, 2021, 09:22 PM »
Snip.
Also as a skill-builder.
Snip.

Especially if you made a mistake on this plywood project, it wouldn't hurt as much.

I know indirectly a guy who sold his DF500 within a year of the purchase, claiming that the machine was difficult to use. The truth was that he hardly used it. Anyone who has used a dovetail jig, such as the Leigh, knows what lack of practice means. Once past the learning curve, no other joinery system can beat the Domino machine. It's an expensive machine that should be used in every suitable opportunity that's available. I use it to build boxes, trays, cabinets, tables, shelves, chairs, etc.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2021, 09:24 PM by ChuckS »

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #29 on: October 20, 2021, 12:12 AM »
    I am not sure I see the need for face frames and cabinet boxes to be able to withstand however many bazillion pounds of force that may be required to break them apart on purpose. Yes, stronger is better but there is also ...... plenty strong enough.  And I am pretty sure any of the methods or combination of methods in this topic will make them strong enough.

    Choose the method that will be the easiest to build them using the tools you have.

Seth

Offline Packard

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #30 on: October 20, 2021, 08:30 AM »
Fasteners for cabinet boxes have two functions:

1.  Hold the joints together
2.  Prevent racking

Dominoes and dowels (with glue) do a good job on both.
Confirmats do a good job on both but are exposed.
Conventional screws (drywall or construction) do a good job of holding the joint together, but a poor job on racking
Pocket screw also do a good job on holding the joint together, but a poor job on racking.

Conventional screws are fast and cheap, but being exposed and lacking racking strength fall short for me.

Pocket screws are hidden and there is a place for them in cabinet construction.

Dados and glue.  The dadoes locate horizontal boards accurately but offer poor racking strength.  There are no exposed fasteners.  But they gain their strength from the total construction contributions.  As a standalone joint, it comes up short.

My preference is (lately) dowels.  They are fast and cheap and offer excellent racking strength.  For Euro cabinets they can be completely hidden.  For face frame, they can be quickly (with no required jigs) through doweled. 

Dominoes are less accessible (pricy equipment required) and the dominoes are far more expensive than dowels.

Beadlock requires expensive tenons (built or purchased) and are tedious to drill out (10 drillings per tenon) and probably have no place in cabinet construction.


Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Crazyraceguy

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #31 on: October 20, 2021, 11:06 AM »
    I am not sure I see the need for face frames and cabinet boxes to be able to withstand however many bazillion pounds of force that may be required to break them apart on purpose. Yes, stronger is better but there is also ...... plenty strong enough.  And I am pretty sure any of the methods or combination of methods in this topic will make them strong enough.

    Choose the method that will be the easiest to build them using the tools you have.

Seth

Yeah, that's kind of what I got out of Packard's post above too.
The term "good enough" is often mocked or looked down upon as being marginal or barely adequate, but I think it applies here very well.
Base cabinets need to be strong enough to hold up the countertop and whatever you reasonably would put on it and uppers need to be strong enough t actually stay on the wall and the shelves not sag. Beyond that is overkill in terms of time and materials used.

My house was built in 1929 and still has most of the original kitchen cabinets. They are "built-ins" that were done on-site with solid wood, with the exception of the doors. I think they were replacements at some time though? One of them is rail/style frame with glass and the rest are 3/8" rabbet overlay plywood. The cabinets themselves are painted white as is that glass door's frame. The flat plywood doors are well aged clear lacquer. I assume that they were originally frame/panel and painted too?
Point being that they have been there over 90 years.....good enough.
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Offline Packard

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #32 on: October 20, 2021, 11:23 AM »
I compulsively over-build everything.  But recently I made a bathroom medicine cabinet using the crudest of joinery.

I used butt joints on 3/4" thick poplar.  Glue and 15 gage nails from a nailgun.  Filler for the nail holes and paint. 

The door as regular rails and stiles with stub tenons. 

It is on the wall.  It seems very sturdy.  It went together quickly.  No regrets.  But I probably won't do that again. 

I am not fond of 18 gage nails for joining boards.  The nails seem to follow the grain and veer off to the side sometimes coming through the side of a panel.  The 15 gage nails don't do that.  Since I was filling the holes anyway and  painting, there was no reason to use the 18 gage nails.

Offline ChuckS

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #33 on: October 20, 2021, 11:34 AM »
Snip.
I am not fond of 18 gage nails for joining boards.  The nails seem to follow the grain and veer off to the side sometimes coming through the side of a panel.  The 15 gage nails don't do that.  Since I was filling the holes anyway and  painting, there was no reason to use the 18 gage nails.

Deflection and blowout - David Schmidt offers this useful guide on brad nails vs finish nails, as published in the Wood magazine.

Offline Crazyraceguy

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #34 on: October 20, 2021, 07:49 PM »
The same goes for narrow-crown staples, they need to be shot perpendicular to the edge.
CSX
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PS420 + Base kit
OF1010
OF1400
MFK700 (2)
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RO90
RO125
ETS EC 125
RAS115
ETS 125 (2)
TS75
Shaper Origin/Workstation

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #35 on: October 21, 2021, 12:05 AM »
I just want to add that I think testing for this type of thing can be used for comparison purposes and to weed out things that are simply "not good enough". But most common types (maybe excepting cheapo factory cabs.) of cabinet box and face frame joinery will all be strong enough.

Seth

Offline tsmi243

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Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #36 on: October 21, 2021, 10:55 AM »
weed out things that are simply "not good enough".

Amen.  Even the "junk" cabinets take some work to remove. 

I think maybe a good studfinder is the real key to quality cabinetmaking.

Offline 4nthony

  • Posts: 70
Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #37 on: October 21, 2021, 12:17 PM »
I found Greg Paolini's Festool-sponsored video series on cabinet construction, which is newer than the earlier video I watched in which Greg used screws, with parts tacked in place with a brad nailer.
In the new video, naturally Greg used dominoes for everything!

Is that the "Mastering Built-In Furniture" series posted in the Popular Woodworking channel or is there another?

« Last Edit: October 22, 2021, 04:03 PM by 4nthony »

Offline fshanno

  • Posts: 1062
Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #38 on: October 28, 2021, 05:27 PM »

Amen.  Even the "junk" cabinets take some work to remove. 

I think maybe a good studfinder is the real key to quality cabinetmaking.

Amen to that!  And for me finding the stud is not the issue.  Finding the CENTER of the stud is the issue.
The one thing we learn from history is that we never learn from history.

Offline fshanno

  • Posts: 1062
Re: Plywood cabinet assembly: screws vs. dominoes
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2021, 05:36 PM »
Time is not really an issue is it?  Once you've made this case you're done right?  You've already spent more time thinking about it than the time difference between the slowest and the fastest methods.

Since you have a Domino it seems like a no brainer.  A lot more fun.  Less mess.  Way cooler.  And you have to clamp pocket holes twice, once to make the pocket hole and again when you drive the screw.  You just have to leave the clamp on longer with a domino.

Any of the methods is strong enough for built in cases.  A nailed butt joint with no glue is strong enough.  4 or 5 dominos with glue in the mortises will do just fine. 

Now if you didn't have a Domino then pocket holes by all means.  First of all, every household should have a pocket hole jig.  It's like duck tape.
The one thing we learn from history is that we never learn from history.