Author Topic: Chipping with different blades  (Read 1564 times)

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Offline sai1

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Chipping with different blades
« on: October 17, 2021, 02:13 PM »
Hello everyone,

today I was comparing the saw blades that I own for my TS55. I was wondering if my ATB 24 tooth blade needs sharpening, since the chipping looks very bad compared to the other 2 blades. Or is this expected for the 24 tooth blade?

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Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2021, 12:19 AM »
Welcome to the forum  [smile]


Maybe needs sharpening maybe not. I'd be using the 48T on melamine anyway. Interesting to see in close up that the splinter guard helps.

Seth

Offline xedos

  • Posts: 519
Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2021, 09:20 AM »
Didn’t realize festool had a 24t blade for the ts55.  I have 28t versions.

Anywho, I don’t think your blade needs sharpening.  The 28t just isn’t going to provide as good a cut in most instances. Your feed rate can be increased with it though.  I also think you’re being a bit too critical.  The cuts on the “money” side look pretty darn good on the 24t blade.

It’s melamine after all.  After you kiss the edges with a sanding block or edgeband them,  those tiny chips would disappear. 

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2021, 10:08 AM »
 
 @sai1 Now that I think about it , I didn't know of a 24T blade either.

   Do you have the part numbers for the blades ?

Seth

Offline sai1

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2021, 11:01 AM »

 @sai1 Now that I think about it , I didn't know of a 24T blade either.

   Do you have the part numbers for the blades ?

Seth

Sorry it is actually the 28T blade, not 24T.

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2021, 11:51 AM »

 @sai1 Now that I think about it , I didn't know of a 24T blade either.

   Do you have the part numbers for the blades ?

Seth

Sorry it is actually the 28T blade, not 24T.

You can expect more chipping with the 28T Universal blade. It is a design that is a compromise between ripping and crosscutting / sheet goods. It will give very good but not necessarily excellent results all around. It is comparable to what is frequently called a combination blade.

Seth

Offline jcrowe1950

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2021, 05:47 PM »
Hello everyone,

today I was comparing the saw blades that I own for my TS55. I was wondering if my ATB 24 tooth blade needs sharpening, since the chipping looks very bad compared to the other 2 blades. Or is this expected for the 24 tooth blade?

(Attachment Link)

   I had another thought. It looks like your material is melamine, or something similar. Festool makes a 48 tooth blade that is designed for cutting laminates and materials like Corian. Perhaps that would result in less chipout on melamine as well. FWIW, the splinterguard on the rail and the splinterguard on the outside of the cut (green) are supposed to create a zero clearance throat to prevent chipout and/or tearout. Since there is no "grain" direction in melamine, I think a fresh green outer splinterguard might help. They are considered consumables and I mark the depth of plunge on mine so I can use them for similar thickness materials. Just a few thoughts.....best of luck in finding a solution.
Festool Specialist at Woodcraft, Chattanooga, TN

Latest Festool purchase...Rotex 150.

Offline Packard

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2021, 12:01 PM »
I got super clean cuts using the OEM blade on melamine clad particleboard.  I made a scoring cut initially by setting the blade depth to the shallowest cut and running the saw backwards on the track.  Then I reset the depth for the full cut.  I got cut edges that were so sharp and crisp I had to be careful about handling or risk cutting my hands on the edges. 

Offline jcrowe1950

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2021, 09:24 PM »
I got super clean cuts using the OEM blade on melamine clad particleboard.  I made a scoring cut initially by setting the blade depth to the shallowest cut and running the saw backwards on the track.  Then I reset the depth for the full cut.  I got cut edges that were so sharp and crisp I had to be careful about handling or risk cutting my hands on the edges.

   Thanks for the tip...that's kind of a brilliant idea. It's sort of like a controlled climb cut on a router......what a hoot.
Festool Specialist at Woodcraft, Chattanooga, TN

Latest Festool purchase...Rotex 150.

Offline xedos

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2021, 09:34 AM »
I got super clean cuts using the OEM blade on melamine clad particleboard.  I made a scoring cut initially by setting the blade depth to the shallowest cut and running the saw backwards on the track.  Then I reset the depth for the full cut.  I got cut edges that were so sharp and crisp I had to be careful about handling or risk cutting my hands on the edges.

   Thanks for the tip...that's kind of a brilliant idea. It's sort of like a controlled climb cut on a router......what a hoot.

The Mafell/Bosch saws have this "scoring" feature built into their depth adjusters.

Offline Packard

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Re: Chipping with different blades
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2021, 10:25 AM »
I would note that the underside of the particle board cuts is always clean.  I suppose if you plan, you can get by with just one perfect side. 

On the other hand, this has become a habit and I routinely do it.

I would also note that the "cabinet grade" 3/4" ply from Lowes has such a thin layer of veneer that it seems to want to fall off the sheet. So I would always score for that.

Also, I saw this done in a video somewhere when I first got the saw.  I did not invent the process. I like to clamp the track because registration has to be perfect for the second cut to be clean.  Even the tiniest shift in placement of the track will negate the scoring cut. 

Also, I make the scoring cut with the saw travelling backwards and the final cut going forward.  I am looking online now and others are making the scoring cut going forward the same as a regular cut.  The method I use has been working for me; I don't plan on changing.

I found this Mafell information and I don't understand the "offset".


How does the scoring function work?

The Mafell scoring function on these saws limits the depth of cut AND offsets the blade .1mm from the cutting line so the user can make a scoring cut, switch off the scoring function, and then perform a normal cut without chipping.  Other track saws either lack a scoring function, or they only limit the cutting depth so that the blade can still damage your workpiece.  The technology behind the Mafell scoring function is a feature normally limited to €20,000+ stationary saws!
« Last Edit: October 27, 2021, 10:28 AM by Packard »